Special Issue "Psychology of Development and Education Applied to Movement"

A special issue of Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology (ISSN 2411-5142). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Exercise for Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Marianna Alesi Website E-Mail
Department of Psychology, Educational Science and Human Movement, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 15, 90128 Palermo, Italy
Interests: Typical Development; Sport; Motivation; Motor development; Physical Activitiy; Development Coordination Disorder; Intellectual Disabilities; Esecutive Functioning
Guest Editor
Dr. Sebastiano Costa Website E-Mail
Department of Psychology, Università degli studi della Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, Viale Ellittico, 31 - 81100 Caserta, Italy
Interests: Motivation; Physical Activitiy; Sport Participation; Self-determination; Educational contexts; Exercise; Typical Development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Physical activity (PA), beyond its recognized value in improving lifestyles, is a natural context to enhance physical and mental health throughout life spans. This is largely documented by research demonstrating how structured and regular PA favors cognitive development, especially executive functions, as well as motivational/emotional development, including self-esteem and self-efficacy. In the past, sport psychology literature produced large studies on motivation as the main subject of interest. Recently, a growing body of studies have been produced by other psychological research areas. Specifically, we assume the perspective of the Psychology of Development and Education Applied to Physical Exercise in order to underlie the physical and motor benefits in the human cognitive and motivational growth. PA characteristics contribute to enhancing high-level cognitive processes (inhibition, shifting, working memory, and planning) and social inclusion in typical populations. Moreover, exercise intervention trainings in atypical populations, such as neurodevelopmental disorders, have been revealed to be efficacious to increase specific cognitive and motivational skills. Nevertheless, sport context characteristics test and train perseverance, effort, and self-determination from a younger age.

To sum up, this Special Issue aims to show several psychological advantages of motor proficiency at a developmental age and in different educational contexts (school, competitive sports, etc.) with regard to typical and atypical populations.

Prof. Dr. Marianna Alesi
Dr. Sebastiano Costa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Morphology and Kinesiology is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Motor skills
  • Exercise intervention programs
  • Sport
  • Cognitive development
  • Motivation
  • Neurodevelopment Disorders

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review, Other

Open AccessArticle
Relationships among Trait EI, Need Fulfilment, and Performance Strategies
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4030050 - 31 Jul 2019
Abstract
Performance strategies used in sport have been the focus of many sport enhancement interventions, and are considered important factors for describing behavior in sport. Several studies have shown that both trait emotion intelligence (trait EI) and satisfaction of basic needs in sport are [...] Read more.
Performance strategies used in sport have been the focus of many sport enhancement interventions, and are considered important factors for describing behavior in sport. Several studies have shown that both trait emotion intelligence (trait EI) and satisfaction of basic needs in sport are relevant aspects of performance strategies used by athletes; however, it seems these two aspects were never tested concurrently, in an integrated framework. The aim of this study was to test a mediational model of psychological basic needs in the relationship between trait EI and performance strategies in sports. In a sample of 187 participants, aged between 16 and 25 years old (Mage = 20.55; SD = 3.39), instruments were administered to measure trait EI, satisfaction of basic needs, and performance strategies in sport. Results of this study showed that trait EI was related to performance strategies in sport and to satisfaction of basic needs, as well as that satisfaction of basic needs was related to performance strategies in sport. Furthermore, satisfaction of basic needs has shown a mediational role in the relation between trait EI and performance strategies in sport. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Development and Education Applied to Movement)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research, Other

Open AccessReview
Sport Intervention Programs (SIPs) to Improve Health and Social Inclusion in People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Systematic Review
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(3), 57; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4030057 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
Inactivity is a major issue that causes physical and psychological health problems, especially in people with intellectual disability (ID). This review discusses the beneficial effects of sport intervention programs (SIPs) in people with ID, and aims to provide an overview of the scientific [...] Read more.
Inactivity is a major issue that causes physical and psychological health problems, especially in people with intellectual disability (ID). This review discusses the beneficial effects of sport intervention programs (SIPs) in people with ID, and aims to provide an overview of the scientific literature in order to identify the main factors influencing the participation of people with ID in SIPs. Twelve papers were analyzed and compared. The results show a large variety in examined SIPs, concerning participants’ age and disability, intervention characteristics and context, as well as measures and findings. The main factors essential for people with ID partaking in SIPs appeared to be suitable places for the SIP development, adequate implementation of physical activity (PA) programs in school and extra-school contexts, education, and the training of teachers and instructors. The literature review highlights the relevance of using SIPs in order to improve physical and psychological health, as well as increase social inclusion in populations with ID. SIPs should be included in multifactor intervention programs. Nevertheless, the need is recognized for stakeholders to adopt specific practice and policy in promoting social inclusion in order to organize intervention strategies which are able to provide quality experiences in sport and physical activity for people with ID. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Development and Education Applied to Movement)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessBrief Report
Assessing Individual Performance in Team Sports: A New Method Developed in Youth Volleyball
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(3), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4030053 - 04 Aug 2019
Abstract
Studying the role of individual differences in team sports performance is a challenge. The main problem is having an available measure of individual performance of each member of the team. In particular, in youth sports, where the level of specialization is reactively low, [...] Read more.
Studying the role of individual differences in team sports performance is a challenge. The main problem is having an available measure of individual performance of each member of the team. In particular, in youth sports, where the level of specialization is reactively low, it appears appropriate that this measure takes the entire performance of the athlete into consideration (i.e., that it assesses all of the athlete’s gestures), while maintaining an ecological validity criterion. Therefore, we devised and calculated an individual assessment measure in volleyball following the subsequent steps: Firstly, we video-recorded at least three volleyball games for each of the 114 youth volleyball players who participated in the study. Then, two independent expert observers evaluated each individual performance by attributing a score to every single gesture performed by the athletes during the games. The derived individual score was adjusted and controlled for the team performance measure, namely the result of each Set the athlete participated in (and for the amount of participation of the athlete to each game). The final measure of individual performance in volleyball proved to be reliable, showing a high level of interrater agreement (r = .841, p < .001) and a significant correlation with the amount of experience in volleyball (r = .173, p < .05). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Development and Education Applied to Movement)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessCase Report
Influence of a Specific Aquatic Program on Social and Gross Motor Skills in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Three Case Reports
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(2), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4020027 - 24 May 2019
Abstract
Swimming pool activities revealed to be efficacious to train psychomotor skills and increase adaptive behaviors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a specific multi-systemic aquatic therapy (CI-MAT) on gross motor [...] Read more.
Swimming pool activities revealed to be efficacious to train psychomotor skills and increase adaptive behaviors in children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a specific multi-systemic aquatic therapy (CI-MAT) on gross motor and social skills in three adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). Methods: three adolescents with ASD of which two boys (M1 with a chronological age of 10.3 years and a mental age of 4.7 years; M2 with a chronological age of 14.6 and a mental age inferior to 4 years) and one girl (chronological age of 14.0 and a mental age inferior to 4 years). The study was divided into three phases: baseline, 12-week CI-MAT program and Post-Test. Participants were administered a battery of tests incorporating anthropometric measurements, gross motor development test and a social skills questionnaire before and after a 12-week MAT-CI program. Results: Subjects improved locomotors and object control skills following the CI-MAT program in a different way. Concerning social behaviors, the higher proportion of gains was observed in the sensitivity of other’s presence and eye contact, for the contact domain, and in the comply turn for the relationship domain. Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the CI-MAT program was effective for the development of gross-motor skills and social behaviors in subjects with ASD. Moreover there is an urge to carry out a whole psychological assessment targeting both motor and adaptive development suitable to provide educational and vocational plans of exercises for people with ASD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Psychology of Development and Education Applied to Movement)
Back to TopTop