Bioactive Glasses in Medical Applications

A special issue of Journal of Functional Biomaterials (ISSN 2079-4983).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 May 2024) | Viewed by 9000

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Institute of Materials Physics and Engineering, Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin, Italy
Interests: ceramics; glasses; porous materials; additive manufacturing; bioactive glasses; bioceramics; composites; tissue engineering; multifunctional biomaterials; biomedical scaffolds; advanced ceramics; sustainable materials; waste management
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Guest Editor
Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (ISM-CNR), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome, Italy
Interests: biomaterials; biomedical coatings; nanotechnology; thin films; calcium phosphates; bioactive glasses; ceramic materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The conceptualization of bioactive glasses caused a revolution in healthcare and paved the way for modern biomaterial-driven regenerative medicine. The first bioactive glass composition, invented by Larry Hench in 1969, was able to bond to living bone and stimulate osteogenesis. Since then, many other bioactive glass compositions have been developed, and some of them finally reached clinical use in an expanding range of forms and applications. The use of bioactive glasses and glass–ceramics is mainly addressed to repair bone and dental defects; however, their full potential seems yet to be fulfilled, and many of today’s achievements—including cancer treatment, controlled drug release, and skin regeneration—were at one point unthinkable. As a result, the research involving bioactive glasses and glass–ceramics is highly stimulating and continuously progressing across various disciplines, including chemistry, materials science, bioengineering, biology, and medicine. The aim of this Special Issue is to provide an overview of the most recent advances in the field of bioactive glasses and glass–ceramics in the medical area.

Therefore, we are collecting selected contributions on all the aspects relevant to the design, development, and applications of these biomaterials. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • synthesis of bioactive glasses;
  • crystallization of bioactive glasses—production and manufacturing of bioactive glass-derived products (coatings, scaffolds etc.) by innovative approaches;
  • new therapeutic potential provided by ion doping, drug incorporation, and surface functionalization;
  • multifunctional bioactive glass-based systems;
  • characterization and testing methodologies;
  • modelling and simulation;
  • in vitro/in vivo studies and clinical applications.

Dr. Francesco Baino
Dr. Julietta V. Rau
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Functional Biomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2700 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • bioactive glass
  • glass–ceramic
  • scaffold
  • coating
  • composite
  • bone tissue engineering
  • soft tissue engineering
  • wound healing
  • drug delivery
  • cancer treatment

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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12 pages, 8359 KiB  
Article
Surface Activation of Calcium Zirconate-Calcium Stabilized Zirconia Eutectic Ceramics with Bioactive Wollastonite-Tricalcium Phosphate Coatings
by Daniel Sola, Eloy Chueca, Shunheng Wang and José Ignacio Peña
J. Funct. Biomater. 2023, 14(10), 510; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb14100510 - 11 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1268
Abstract
In this work, we have developed and characterized a ceramic composite based on a core of directionally solidified calcium zirconate-calcium stabilized zirconia (CZO-CSZ) eutectic composite coated with a bioactive glass-ceramic. The aim is to research new orthopedic implants as an alternative to conventional [...] Read more.
In this work, we have developed and characterized a ceramic composite based on a core of directionally solidified calcium zirconate-calcium stabilized zirconia (CZO-CSZ) eutectic composite coated with a bioactive glass-ceramic. The aim is to research new orthopedic implants as an alternative to conventional 3Y-TZP bioinert ceramics. The CZO-CSZ eutectic rods were grown from the melt of rods of CaO-ZrO2 in the eutectic composition using the laser floating zone technique (LFZ). The mechanical results indicated that directional eutectics prepared with this technique exhibited good mechanical strength and significant hardness and toughness. The LFZ technique was also used to melt the bioactive coating previously placed by dip coating on the CZO-CSZ rod surface. Depending on the thickness of the coating and the applied laser power, an alloying or coating process was achieved. In the first case, the coating was diluted with the surface of the eutectic cylinder, leading to the segregation of the calcium zirconate and zirconia phases and the formation of a bioactive phase embedding zirconia particles. In the second case, a layer of ceramic glass was formed, well attached to the eutectic cylinder. These layers were both studied from the microstructural and bioactivity points of view. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses in Medical Applications)
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18 pages, 3533 KiB  
Article
High Boron Content Enhances Bioactive Glass Biodegradation
by Amina Gharbi, Hassane Oudadesse, Hafedh el Feki, Wissem Cheikhrouhou-Koubaa, Xanthippi Chatzistavrou, Julietta V. Rau, Jyrki Heinämäki, Iulian Antoniac, Nureddin Ashammakhi and Nabil Derbel
J. Funct. Biomater. 2023, 14(7), 364; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb14070364 - 11 Jul 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1512
Abstract
Derived Hench bioactive glass (BaG) containing boron (B) is explored in this work as it plays an important role in bone development and regeneration. B was also found to enhance BaG dissociation. However, it is only possible to incorporate a limited amount of [...] Read more.
Derived Hench bioactive glass (BaG) containing boron (B) is explored in this work as it plays an important role in bone development and regeneration. B was also found to enhance BaG dissociation. However, it is only possible to incorporate a limited amount of B. To increase the amount of B in BaG, bioactive borosilicate glasses (BaG-Bx) were fabricated based on the use of the solution-gelation process (sol-gel). In this work, a high B content (20 wt.%) in BaG, respecting the conditions of bioactivity and biodegradability required by Hench, was achieved for the first time. The capability of BaG-Bx to form an apatite phase was assessed in vitro by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). Then, the chemical structure and the morphological changes in the fabricated BaG-Bx (x = 0, 5, 10 and 20) were studied. The formation of hydroxyapatite (HAp) layer was observed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy. The presence of HAp layer was confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Enhanced bioactivity and chemical stability of BaG-Bx were evaluated with an ion exchange study based on Inductively Coupled Plasma–Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results indicate that by increasing the concentration of B in BaG-Bx, the crystallization rate and the quality of the newly formed HAp layer on BaG-Bx surfaces can be improved. The presence of B also leads to enhanced degradation of BaGs in SBF. Accordingly, BAG-Bx can be used for bone regeneration, especially in children, because of its faster degradation as compared to B-free glass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses in Medical Applications)
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14 pages, 4910 KiB  
Article
Ce-MBGs Loaded with Gentamicin: Characterization and In Vitro Evaluation
by Francesca Fraulini, Stefano Raimondi, Francesco Candeliere, Raffaella Ranieri, Alfonso Zambon and Gigliola Lusvardi
J. Funct. Biomater. 2023, 14(3), 129; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb14030129 - 26 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1506
Abstract
Mesoporous Bioactive Glasses (MBGs) are biomaterials widely used in tissue engineering, particularly for hard tissue regeneration. One of the most frequent postoperative complications following a biomaterial surgical implant is a bacterial infection, which usually requires treatment by the systemic administration of drugs (e.g., [...] Read more.
Mesoporous Bioactive Glasses (MBGs) are biomaterials widely used in tissue engineering, particularly for hard tissue regeneration. One of the most frequent postoperative complications following a biomaterial surgical implant is a bacterial infection, which usually requires treatment by the systemic administration of drugs (e.g., antibiotics). In order to develop biomaterials with antibiotic properties, we investigated cerium-doped MBGs (Ce-MBGs) as in situ-controlled drug delivery systems (DDSs) of gentamicin (Gen), a wide spectrum antibiotic commonly employed against bacteria responsible of postoperative infections. Here we report the optimization of Gen loading on MBGs and the evaluation of the antibacterial properties and of retention of bioactivity and antioxidant properties of the resulting materials. The Gen loading (up to 7%) was found to be independent from cerium content, and the optimized Gen-loaded Ce-MBGs retain significant bioactivity and antioxidant properties. The antibacterial efficacy was verified up to 10 days of controlled release. These properties make Gen-loaded Ce-MBGs interesting candidates for simultaneous hard tissue regeneration and in situ antibiotic release. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses in Medical Applications)
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11 pages, 5095 KiB  
Article
Bioactive Glass-Ceramic Scaffolds Coated with Hyaluronic Acid–Fatty Acid Conjugates: A Feasibility Study
by Stefania De Luca, Valentina Verdoliva, Saeid Kargozar and Francesco Baino
J. Funct. Biomater. 2023, 14(1), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb14010026 - 2 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2230
Abstract
Promoting bone healing is a key challenge in our society that can be tackled by developing new implantable biomaterials provided with regenerative properties. In this work, the coating of three-dimensional porous glass-derived scaffolds with hyaluronic acid (HA)-fatty acids was investigated for the first [...] Read more.
Promoting bone healing is a key challenge in our society that can be tackled by developing new implantable biomaterials provided with regenerative properties. In this work, the coating of three-dimensional porous glass-derived scaffolds with hyaluronic acid (HA)-fatty acids was investigated for the first time. The starting scaffolds, based on bioactive silicate glass, were produced by foam replication followed by sintering; then, HA-palmitate and HA-oleate conjugate coatings were deposited on the scaffold struts through a dipping procedure. FT-IR analysis confirmed the successful deposition of the coatings on the surface and struts of the scaffolds, the foam-like architecture of which was maintained as assessed by SEM investigations. The in vitro bioactivity of the HA–fatty-acid-coated scaffolds was studied by immersion tests in simulated body fluid and the subsequent evaluation of hydroxyapatite formation. The deposition of the polymeric coating did not inhibit the apatite-forming ability of scaffolds, as revealed by the formation of nanostructured hydroxyapatite agglomerates 48 h from immersion. These promising results motivate further investigation of these novel bioactive systems, which are expected to combine the bone-bonding properties of the glass with the wound-healing promotion carried out by the polymeric conjugates. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses in Medical Applications)
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Review

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26 pages, 3537 KiB  
Review
Advancements in Biomedical Applications of Calcium Phosphate Glass and Glass-Based Devices—A Review
by Jawad T. Pandayil, Nadia G. Boetti and Davide Janner
J. Funct. Biomater. 2024, 15(3), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfb15030079 - 21 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1452
Abstract
Calcium phosphate (CaP) glass has recently gained popularity as a promising material for a wide range of biomedical applications. Recent developments have seen CaP glasses moving from a passive implant material to an active degradable material, particularly as a major constituent of bioresorbable [...] Read more.
Calcium phosphate (CaP) glass has recently gained popularity as a promising material for a wide range of biomedical applications. Recent developments have seen CaP glasses moving from a passive implant material to an active degradable material, particularly as a major constituent of bioresorbable photonic devices. This holds great promise in advanced biomedical applications, since the main constituents of CaP glasses are present in the human body. In this review, the progressive advancements in the biomedical applications of calcium phosphate glass-based devices over the past 50 years are discussed. An overview of their role as reinforcing agents and the studies on doping their matrices for ion releasing and drug and gene delivery are reviewed. Recent applications of CaP glass and fibers in soft-tissue engineering and their potential for optical quality bioresorbable devices are then discussed along with the current challenges and potential future directions, emphasizing the promising role of CaP glass in the next generation of biomaterials. Considering their progress and potential in performing several biomedical functionalities over time, CaP glass-based devices hold promise for becoming enabling tools as an implantable, bioresorbable, multifunctional class of devices in future biomedicine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Glasses in Medical Applications)
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