Neuroendocrine Tumors: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy—Volume II

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 September 2024 | Viewed by 1568

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Unit, Humanitas Clinical and Research Center IRCCS, Rozzano, Milan, Italy
Interests: celiac disease; autoimmune atrophic gastritis; diet; nutrition; micronutrient deficiency
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are thrilled to announce the upcoming release of our second volume of this Special Issue series, titled "Neuroendocrine Tumors: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy—Volume II”. We also invite you to visit our website to access the first volume of our Special Issue, available at the following link: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/jcm/special_issues/neuro_endocrine_tumor.

Neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) are rare and heterogeneous tumors whose incidence has increased in recent years due to better disease knowledge and improvements in diagnostic tools, particularly endoscopy and nuclear medicine. They frequently arise from the gastro-enteropancreatic (GEP) tract, representing approximately 2% of all malignant tumors of the GEP system.

Given their rarity and clinical and biological heterogeneity, there is an urgent need for standardized guidelines for the proper management of these neoplasms, which should always be referred to tertiary referral centers. Novel research strategies are needed to better define diagnostic and therapeutic algorithms, particularly for some specific subgroups of poorly known tumors, including duodenal NENs and functioning tumors. The cooperation between referral centers and the creation of international disease registries should be encouraged to better understand the biology and natural history of these neoplasms and consequently improve their management.

The focus of this Special Issue is to consider the following research aspects of NENs: (1) epidemiology and risk factors to define specific subgroups of patients characterized by dismal prognosis; (2) genomic characterization; and (3) innovations in multidisciplinary management in both diagnosis and treatment, including surgery (resection and liver transplant), loco-regional treatments, and medical therapy in adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and metastatic settings.

We extend our sincere gratitude for your continued support of our Special Issue series and eagerly anticipate your contributions to future volumes, contributing to the ongoing progress in neuroendocrine neoplasms research.

Dr. Roberta Elisa Rossi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • neuroendocrine tumors
  • carcinoid syndrome
  • gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs)
  • somatostatin receptor imaging
  • peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT)
  • neuroendocrine differentiation
  • multiple endocrine neoplasia (MEN)

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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10 pages, 14599 KiB  
Article
Clinical Outcome of Patients with Gastric, Duodenal, or Rectal Neuroendocrine Tumors after Incomplete Endoscopic Resection
by Elisabetta Dell’Unto, Matteo Marasco, Mirta Mosca, Camilla Gallo, Gianluca Esposito, Maria Rinzivillo, Emanuela Pilozzi, Federica Orrù, Davide Campana, Sara Massironi, Bruno Annibale and Francesco Panzuto
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(9), 2535; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13092535 - 25 Apr 2024
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Abstract
Objectives: Our aim was to investigate the clinical outcome of patients with well-differentiated gastric, duodenal, and rectal neuroendocrine tumors after treatment with incomplete endoscopic resection due to the finding of microscopic positive resection margins (R1). Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of consecutive [...] Read more.
Objectives: Our aim was to investigate the clinical outcome of patients with well-differentiated gastric, duodenal, and rectal neuroendocrine tumors after treatment with incomplete endoscopic resection due to the finding of microscopic positive resection margins (R1). Methods: This is a retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with type 1 gastric, non-ampullary non-functioning duodenal, or rectal neuroendocrine neoplasms with positive R1 margins after endoscopic resection. The rate of tumor recurrence and progression-free survival were considered to be the study’s main endpoints. Statistical analysis was performed using MedCalc® v.17 software and a p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. A Cox proportional-hazard regression was performed to identify risk factors for disease recurrence/progression. Results: After evaluating 110 patients, a total of 58 patients were included in the final analysis (15 gastric NENs, 12 duodenal NENs, and 31 rectal NENs). After evidence of endoscopic R1 resection had been gathered, 26 patients (44.8%) underwent an endoscopic/surgical extension of the previous resection. Tumor progression (all local recurrences) occurred in five out of fifty-eight patients (8.6%) with a median PFS of 36 months. There were no tumor-related deaths. G2 grading and the gastric primary tumor site were the only features significantly associated with the risk of recurrence of the disease (HR: 11.97 [95% CI: 1.22–116.99], HR: 12.54 [95% CI: 1.28–122.24], respectively). Conclusions: Tumor progression rarely occurs in patients with microscopic positive margin excision (R1) after endoscopic resection and does not seem to affect patients’ clinical outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroendocrine Tumors: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy—Volume II)
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10 pages, 1278 KiB  
Systematic Review
Endoscopic Resection for Duodenal Neuroendocrine Neoplasms between 10 and 20 mm—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Roberta Elisa Rossi, Benedetta Masoni, Sara Massironi, Giacomo Marcozzi, Gianluca Franchellucci, Angelo Zullo, Antonio Facciorusso, Silvia Carrara, Nadim Mahmud, Giulia Migliorisi, Silvia Ferretti, Roberta Maselli, Cesare Hassan and Alessandro Repici
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1466; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051466 - 2 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background. The optimal management of duodenal neuroendocrine neoplasms (dNENs) sized 10–20 mm remains controversial and although endoscopic resection is increasingly performed instead of surgery, the therapeutic approach in this setting is not fully standardized. We performed a systematic review of the literature and [...] Read more.
Background. The optimal management of duodenal neuroendocrine neoplasms (dNENs) sized 10–20 mm remains controversial and although endoscopic resection is increasingly performed instead of surgery, the therapeutic approach in this setting is not fully standardized. We performed a systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis to clarify the outcomes of endoscopic resection for 10–20 mm dNENs in terms of efficacy (i.e., recurrence rate) and safety. Methods. A computerized literature search was performed using relevant keywords to identify pertinent articles published until January 2023. Results. Seven retrospective studies were included in this systematic review. The overall recurrence rate was 14.6% (95%CI 5.4–27.4) in 65 patients analyzed, without significant heterogeneity. When considering studies specifically focused on endoscopic mucosal resection, the recurrence rate was 20.5% (95%CI 10.7–32.4), without significant heterogeneity. The ability to obtain the free margin after endoscopic resection ranged between 36% and 100%. No complications were observed in the four studies reporting this information. Conclusions. Endoscopic resection could be the first treatment option in patients with dNENs sized 10–20 mm and without evidence of metastatic disease. Further studies are needed to draw more solid conclusions, particularly in terms of superiority among the available endoscopic techniques. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neuroendocrine Tumors: Etiology, Diagnosis, and Therapy—Volume II)
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