Uterine, Endometrial, Ovarian, and Cervical Cancer: Epidemiology and Treatment Strategies

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 3547

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Seoul Metropolitan Government - Seoul National University Borame Medical Centerdisabled, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Interests: gynecologic oncology

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Guest Editor
Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea
Interests: gynecologic oncology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Gynecological cancers including cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, and ovarian cancer have unique disease properties. Treatment for early-stage cervical or endometrial cancer almost always involves using minimally invasive surgery (MIS); laparoscopic surgery and robotic surgery have exhibited pronounced development, and the improvement of the safety of these surgeries is crucial for patients. Another focus on endometrial cancer is a different strategy associated with molecular classification. In ovarian cancer, recent molecular and genetic analysis is remarkable, and adjuvant chemotherapy for ovarian cancer is completely different from that of ten years ago. Artificial intelligence (AI) modalities might extend and expand human intelligence, and the diagnostic significance of AI technology is steadily progressing. Another remarkable issue related to gynecological cancer is the finding of gene fusions that are thought to be driver mutations. The oncology panel is developed and should be a promising candidate modality to find suitable drugs for unusual gynecologic tumors.

In this Special Issue, the authors will present the most recent studies concerning the development of gynecological cancers. These include treatment strategies for various gynecological cancers and the molecular characterization and prognostic parameters of gynecological cancers. We welcome the submission of novel research to help researchers and women who have an interest in gynecologic cancers to learn more about these diseases (symptoms, prevention, and early diagnosis), and improve their treatment.

Prof. Dr. Taek Sang Lee
Prof. Dr. Sung Jong Lee
Guest Editors

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 239 KiB  
Article
The Association between Metabolic Syndrome and Epithelial Cell Abnormalities Detected on Pap Smear: A Nationwide Population-Based Study
by Dayong Lee and Taek Sang Lee
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(8), 2954; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12082954 - 19 Apr 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1192
Abstract
Several epidemiologic studies have suggested the correlation between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cervical cancer. The identification of epithelial cell abnormalities through cervical cytology implies lesions that may lead to cervical cancer in the long term, making screening a crucial measure for its prevention. [...] Read more.
Several epidemiologic studies have suggested the correlation between metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cervical cancer. The identification of epithelial cell abnormalities through cervical cytology implies lesions that may lead to cervical cancer in the long term, making screening a crucial measure for its prevention. We conducted a case-control study using data from the National Health Screening Programs under the Health Insurance System of South Korea between 2009 and 2017. Among women who underwent a Pap smear during this period, 8,606,394 tests reported negative results for epithelial cell abnormalities (controls, 93.7%), while 580,012 tests reported epithelial cell abnormalities (cases, 6.3%). Of these, the incidence of MetS was significantly higher in the case group, with 21.7% of cases and 18.4% of controls meeting the MetS criteria with p-Value of less than 0.0001; however, the effect size was small with odds ratio of 1.23. Logistic regression analysis revealed increased odds of epithelial cell abnormalities in women with MetS after adjusting for associated risk factors (AOR 1.202, 95% CI 1.195–1.210, p < 0.0001). These findings indicate that women with MetS have an elevated risk of developing epithelial cell abnormalities, reinforcing the importance of regular Pap smear screening to prevent cervical cancer progression in this population. Full article
15 pages, 4090 KiB  
Article
The Global, Regional, and National Uterine Cancer Burden Attributable to High BMI from 1990 to 2019: A Systematic Analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019
by Jingchun Liu, Haoyu Wang, Zhi Wang, Wuyue Han and Li Hong
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(5), 1874; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12051874 - 27 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1997
Abstract
Uterine cancer (UC) is the most common gynecologic malignancy, and high body mass index (BMI) is a poor prognostic factor for UC. However, the associated burden has not been fully assessed, which is crucial for women’s health management and the prevention and control [...] Read more.
Uterine cancer (UC) is the most common gynecologic malignancy, and high body mass index (BMI) is a poor prognostic factor for UC. However, the associated burden has not been fully assessed, which is crucial for women’s health management and the prevention and control of UC. Therefore, we utilized the Global Burden of Disease Study (GBD) 2019 to describe the global, regional, and national UC burden due to high BMI from 1990 to 2019. The data show that globally, women’s high BMI exposure is increasing annually, with most regions having higher rates of high BMI exposure than the global average. In 2019, 36,486 [95% uncertainty interval (UI): 25,131 to 49,165] UC deaths were attributed to high BMI globally, accounting for 39.81% (95% UI: 27.64 to 52.67) of all UC deaths. The age-standardized mortality rate (ASMR) and age-standardized disability-adjusted life years (DALY) rate (ASDR) for high BMI-associated UC remained stable globally from 1990 to 2019, with significant differences across regions. Higher ASDR and ASMR were found in higher socio-demographic index (SDI) regions, and lower SDI regions had the fastest estimated annual percentage changes (EAPCs) for both rates. Among all age groups, the fatal outcome of UC with high BMI occurs most frequently in women over 80 years old. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Comparison of 2009 and 2023 FIGO staging system and Evalua-tion of Survivals in Endometrial Cancers

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