Hearing Disorders: Diagnosis, Management, and Future Opportunities: Part II

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Otolaryngology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2023) | Viewed by 17397

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1st Academic ENT Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, AHEPA Hospital, 546 36 Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: hearing rehabilitation; middle and inner ear; ear surgery; cochlear implantation; auditory brainstem responses; facial nerve electrophysiology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is my pleasure to invite you and members of your research group to submit an article for a Special Issue titled “Hearing Disorders: Diagnosis, Management, and Future Opportunities: Part II”. This is one new volume, we published more than 10 papers in the first volume. For more details, please visit: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/jcm/special_issues/hearing_disorders

Hearing loss represents one of the most wide-ranging disabilities, affecting more than 5% of the world's population. Different types of hearing loss, including conductive and sensorineural hearing loss, may lead to serious hearing impairments in children and adults. Diagnosis and management continue to be a challenge for hearing disorders such as chronic otitis media, otosclerosis, cholesteatoma, congenital or acquired sensorineural hearing loss, sudden sensorineural hearing loss, autoimmune or metabolic hearing loss, and otogenic facial palsy. Electrophysiology and neuroscience approaches are needed in order to better elucidate the diagnostic dilemmas in the field of otology and neurotology. New treatment options will be discussed to improve potential methods of hearing restoration. We especially encourage submissions concerning hearing aids, cochlear/vestibular/auditory brainstem implantation, middle ear surgery, and stapedotomy.

Dr. George Psillas
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • middle ear surgery
  • otosclerosis
  • sensorineural hearing loss
  • sudden hearing
  • cochlear implant

Related Special Issues

Published Papers (10 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

3 pages, 175 KiB  
Editorial
The Effect of Anxiolytics on Tinnitus
by George Psillas and Chrysoula Vlachou
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(22), 7076; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12227076 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 851
Abstract
Tinnitus is a perceptual disorder in which sound is perceived by the patient in the absence of an external or internal acoustic stimulation [...] Full article
3 pages, 182 KiB  
Editorial
Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in the Treatment of Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss
by George Psillas
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(4), 1515; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12041515 - 14 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1532
Abstract
Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) is a frustrating and frightening experience for a patient [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

11 pages, 1750 KiB  
Article
Change in the Characteristics of Patients Qualified for Hearing Aids over the Last 25 Years in Poland
by Karolina Dżaman, Marlena Ziemska-Gorczyca and Ireneusz Kantor
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(17), 5625; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12175625 - 29 Aug 2023
Viewed by 844
Abstract
Hearing loss is one of the most common causes of disability worldwide. The aim of the study was to compare the demographic structure and the results of hearing tests in people qualified for hearing aids over the last 25 years. The material covered [...] Read more.
Hearing loss is one of the most common causes of disability worldwide. The aim of the study was to compare the demographic structure and the results of hearing tests in people qualified for hearing aids over the last 25 years. The material covered 1246 patients qualified for hearing aids in the years 1996–2001 and 2016–2021. Patients were divided into two groups according to the time of qualifying for hearing aids. Group 1 (G1) consisted of 759 people qualified in the years 1996–2001, and Group 2 (G2) comprised 487 people qualified in the years 2016–2021. Statistical analysis was performed on the results of pure tone threshold audiometry and the demographic structure in both groups. Patients in G1 had statistically significantly elevated hearing thresholds (HT) in the air conduction range at frequencies from 2000 to 8000 Hz in relation to G2 patients. The opposite situation was observed for the bone conduction threshold. G2 patients had significantly elevated bone conduction HT at frequencies from 250 to 1000 Hz compared to G1 patients. The age structure in both groups was similar; however, the gender distribution was statistically significantly different. In G1 women accounted for 40%, and in G2, they became the dominant gender (53%). Over the last twenty years, there has been a change in the structure of patients qualified for hearing aids. Although the age has remained similar, today, patients decide to use hearing aids at an earlier stage of hearing loss than 25 years ago. Modern women began to use hearing aids much more often. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

19 pages, 2766 KiB  
Article
Extended Preoperative Audiometry for Outcome Prediction and Risk Analysis in Patients Receiving Cochlear Implants
by Jan-Henrik Rieck, Annika Beyer, Alexander Mewes, Amke Caliebe and Matthias Hey
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(9), 3262; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12093262 - 3 May 2023
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 1844
Abstract
Background: The outcome of cochlear implantation has improved over the last decades, but there are still patients with less benefit. Despite numerous studies examining the cochlear implant (CI) outcome, variations in speech comprehension with CI remains incompletely explained. The aim of this study [...] Read more.
Background: The outcome of cochlear implantation has improved over the last decades, but there are still patients with less benefit. Despite numerous studies examining the cochlear implant (CI) outcome, variations in speech comprehension with CI remains incompletely explained. The aim of this study was therefore to examine preoperative pure-tone audiogram and speech comprehension as well as aetiology, to investigate their relationship with postoperative speech comprehension in CI recipients. Methods: A retrospective study with 664 ears of 530 adult patients was conducted. Correlations between the target variable postoperative word comprehension with the preoperative speech and sound comprehension as well as aetiology were investigated. Significant correlations were inserted into multivariate models. Speech comprehension measured as word recognition score at 70 dB with CI was analyzed as (i) a continuous and (ii) a dichotomous variable. Results: All variables that tested preoperative hearing were significantly correlated with the dichotomous target; with the continuous target, all except word comprehension at 65 dB with hearing aid. The strongest correlation with postoperative speech comprehension was seen for monosyllabic words with hearing aid at 80 dB. The preoperative maximum word comprehension was reached or surpassed by 97.3% of CI patients. Meningitis and congenital diseases were strongly negatively associated with postoperative word comprehension. The multivariate model was able to explain 40% of postoperative variability. Conclusion: Speech comprehension with hearing aid at 80 dB can be used as a supplementary preoperative indicator of CI-aided speech comprehension and should be measured regularly in the clinical routine. Combining audiological and aetiological variables provides more insights into the variability of the CI outcome, allowing for better patient counselling. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1295 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Bilateral Cochlear Implantation in Pediatric and Adult Patients with Profound Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Retrospective Analysis in a Developing European Country
by Claudia Raluca Balasa Virzob, Marioara Poenaru, Raluca Morar, Ioana Delia Horhat, Nicolae Constantin Balica, Reshmanth Prathipati, Radu Dumitru Moleriu, Ana-Olivia Toma, Iulius Juganaru, Vlad Bloanca, Gratiana Nicoleta Chicin, Roxana Manuela Fericean, Eugenia Maria Domuta, Mircea Iurciuc and Stela Iurciuc
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(8), 2948; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12082948 - 18 Apr 2023
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2054
Abstract
This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of bilateral cochlear implantation in patients with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss at the Timisoara Municipal Emergency Clinical Hospital ENT Clinic. The study involved 77 participants, divided into four groups based on their hearing loss characteristics [...] Read more.
This retrospective study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of bilateral cochlear implantation in patients with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss at the Timisoara Municipal Emergency Clinical Hospital ENT Clinic. The study involved 77 participants, divided into four groups based on their hearing loss characteristics and implantation history. Assessments were conducted pre- and post-implantation, focusing on speech perception, speech production, and reading achievement. Standard surgical procedures were performed, and participants were provided with a comprehensive rehabilitation program involving auditory training and communication therapy. The variables considered for analysis included demographic factors, implantation period, and quality of life assessment, with no statistically significant differences pre-implantation between the four study groups. Results revealed significant improvements in speech perception, speech production, and reading achievement after cochlear implantation. In adult patients, speech perception scores increased from 21.3% to 73.4% for WIPI and from 22.7% to 68.4% for HINT after 12 months of rehabilitation. Speech production scores improved from 33.5% to 76.8% and reading achievement scores increased from 76.2 to 106.3. Moreover, there was a significant improvement in patients’ quality of life following cochlear implantation, with mean scores increasing from 2.0 to 4.2. Although it is known that bilateral cochlear implantation significantly improves speech perception, speech production, reading achievement, and quality of life in patients with severe-to-profound sensorineural hearing loss, this is the first study of its kind from Romania. Further research is warranted to optimize patient selection and rehabilitation strategies to maximize outcomes and determine better policies towards funding and access of cochlear implants for a wider range of patients in need. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

11 pages, 1271 KiB  
Article
Auditory Steady-State Response and Hearing Impairment in Survivors of Childhood Bacterial Meningitis in Luanda, Angola
by Mariia Karppinen, Emilie Rugemalira, Okko Savonius, Manuel Leite Cruzeiro, Antti Aarnisalo, Topi Jutila and Tuula Pelkonen
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(8), 2842; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12082842 - 13 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1379
Abstract
Survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) often develop hearing impairment (HI). In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), BM continues to be a significant cause of hearing disability. We assessed hearing among BM survivors using auditory steady-state responses (ASSR), providing frequency-specific estimated audiograms, and [...] Read more.
Survivors of childhood bacterial meningitis (BM) often develop hearing impairment (HI). In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), BM continues to be a significant cause of hearing disability. We assessed hearing among BM survivors using auditory steady-state responses (ASSR), providing frequency-specific estimated audiograms, and examined whether ASSR would provide a greater understanding of BM-induced HI. Survivors from two prospective BM trials (ISRCTN62824827; NCT01540838) from Luanda Children’s Hospital were examined in a follow-up visit with a median duration of 26 months after BM. The hearing of 50 BM survivors and 19 control children was evaluated using ASSR and auditory brainstem response (ABR) after interview and neurological and otorhinolaryngological examinations. The median age of survivors was 80 (IQR 86) months. We diagnosed HI (better ear hearing ≥ 26 dB) in 9/50 (18%) children. Five of the fifty survivors (10%) and 14/100 ears (14%) had profound HI (>80 dB). Severe-to-profound HI affected all frequencies steadily, affecting only the ears of BM survivors (18/100 vs. 0/38, p = 0.003). When looking only at the severely or profoundly affected ears, young age, low Glascow coma score, pneumococcal aetiology, and ataxia were associated with a worse hearing outcome. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 1648 KiB  
Article
Predictable Factors of People with Asymmetrical Hearing Loss Wearing a Hearing Aid in the Worse Ear Only
by Heil Noh and Dong-Hee Lee
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(6), 2251; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12062251 - 14 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1518
Abstract
In patients with bilateral asymmetrical hearing loss (AHL), where only one hearing aid is available, it is difficult to decide which ear to amplify. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of hearing aid use for AHL patients fitted with [...] Read more.
In patients with bilateral asymmetrical hearing loss (AHL), where only one hearing aid is available, it is difficult to decide which ear to amplify. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of hearing aid use for AHL patients fitted with a hearing aid in their worse ear only. One-hundred-two adults with asymmetrical-mixed or sensorineural hearing loss were retrospectively included. AHL was classified into three subgroups: unilateral hearing loss (UHL) and AHL type 1 (AHL1) and type 2 (AHL2). The main outcome measures were (1) the time spent wearing a hearing aid, (2) the hearing in a noise test (HINT), (3) the sound localization test and (4) the Korean version of the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA). The 1 kHz-hearing threshold of the better ear was significantly better in the successful users than in the intermittent users for UHL. Younger age was associated with significantly better outcomes than older for AHL1 and AHL2. Among the etiologies of AHL, sudden hearing loss was associated with significantly better outcomes of hearing aid use for AHL, UHL and AHL1 patients. In this study, the success rate and usage rates were 43.1% and 67.6% in AHL patients wearing a hearing aid in the worse ear. This study identified the hearing threshold of 1 kHz from the better ear, age and etiology of sudden hearing loss as audiometric and non-audiometric factors that affected the outcomes of hearing aid use. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

16 pages, 449 KiB  
Article
A Prospective Study of Genetic Variants in Infants with Congenital Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss
by Marlin Johansson, Eva Karltorp, Filip Asp and Erik Berninger
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(2), 495; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12020495 - 7 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2421
Abstract
Children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (uSNHL) have a high risk of speech-language delays and academic difficulties. Still, challenges remain in the diagnosis of uSNHL. With a prospective cross-sectional design, 20 infants were consecutively recruited from a universal newborn hearing screening program and [...] Read more.
Children with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (uSNHL) have a high risk of speech-language delays and academic difficulties. Still, challenges remain in the diagnosis of uSNHL. With a prospective cross-sectional design, 20 infants were consecutively recruited from a universal newborn hearing screening program and invited to genetic testing. Eighteen of the subjects agreed to genetic testing, 15 subjects with OtoSCOPE® v.9 screening 224 genes, and four subjects underwent targeted testing, screening for chromosomal abnormalities or 105–137 gene mutations. The genetic results were described together with the 20 infants’ previously published auditory profiles and imaging results. Genetic causes for the uSNHL were found in 28% of subjects (5/18) including CHARGE syndrome (CHD7), autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (GJB2), Townes–Brocks syndrome (SALL1), Pendred Syndrome (SLC26A4) and Chromosome 8P inverted duplication and deletion syndrome. In subjects with comorbidities (malformation of fingers, anus, brain, and heart), 100% were diagnosed with a genetic cause for uSNHL (3/3 subjects), while 13% (2/15 subjects) were diagnosed without comorbidities observed at birth (p = 0.002). Genetic testing for congenital uSNHL is currently efficient for alleged syndromes, whereas genetic variants for non-syndromic congenital uSNHL need further research. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

9 pages, 265 KiB  
Article
Psychological Profile and Social Behaviors of Patients with Hyperacusis
by Luca Sacchetto, Enrico Apa, Andrea Ciorba, Silvia Palma, Valeria Caragli, Chiara Gherpelli, Daniele Monzani, Elisabetta Genovese and Riccardo Nocini
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(24), 7317; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11247317 - 9 Dec 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1640
Abstract
Increased noise sensitivity refers to the abnormal subjective response to external sounds, with a prevalence of between 8% and 15.2% in the adult population as suggested by epidemiological studies. The basic neural mechanism of hyperacusis still remains obscure, so therapies for this often-devastating [...] Read more.
Increased noise sensitivity refers to the abnormal subjective response to external sounds, with a prevalence of between 8% and 15.2% in the adult population as suggested by epidemiological studies. The basic neural mechanism of hyperacusis still remains obscure, so therapies for this often-devastating symptom remain elusive. The aim of this study was to assess psychological profiles in patients with presbycusis without tinnitus in a perspective case-control design. All subjects were initially submitted to audiological evaluation (tympanometry, recordings of the acoustic reflex thresholds, pure tone audiometry) and subsequently were administered the following questionnaires: the hyperacusis questionnaire (HQ), the brief symptom inventory (BSI), and the modified somatic perception questionnaire (MSPQ). Patients with hyperacusis reported a total score and subscales (attentional, social, and emotional) of the HQ significantly higher than controls. They also reported higher scores of the MSPQ and significantly higher mean values with concern to the somatization, obsessive-compulsive, interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and anxiety subscales of the BSI. These results show that psychological distress, as expressed by higher level of somatic attention, somatization, anxiety, and depression, is a significant factor to consider for a complete diagnosis and effective treatment of hyperacusis. For a correct diagnosis of patients seeking help for hyperacusis, their psychological distress should also be assessed, regardless of their hearing abilities. Further studies are required to investigate the pathological mechanisms that are involved in the onset of hyperacusis in patients with normal hearing and those with sensorineural hearing loss. Full article
6 pages, 212 KiB  
Article
The Influence of Steroid Therapy on the Treatment Results in Patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss
by Paweł Rozbicki, Jacek Usowski, Jacek Siewiera and Dariusz Jurkiewicz
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(20), 6085; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11206085 - 15 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2109
Abstract
Oral, intravenous, or intratympanic steroid therapy (ST) are commonly applied methods of pharmacotherapy in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL). There are vast discrepancies on the recommended initial dose and the duration of ST in medical reports. The aim of the research is a [...] Read more.
Oral, intravenous, or intratympanic steroid therapy (ST) are commonly applied methods of pharmacotherapy in Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss (SSNHL). There are vast discrepancies on the recommended initial dose and the duration of ST in medical reports. The aim of the research is a retrospective comparison of patients’ examination results with different therapeutical strategies. The medical records of 218 patients treated for SSNHL at the Military Institute of Medicine were subjected to retrospective analysis by comparison of the results of pure tone audiometry prior to and after treatment with steroid therapy (first-dose delay, mass of first dose, duration of treatment). Postponement of implementation of ST to 5 days resulted in a significant improvement of hearing across all frequencies. The implementation of ST sequentially in periods (5th–10th day; >10th day) resulted in a statistically insignificant improvement of hearing in the following frequencies: 250 Hz, 1000 Hz, 1500 Hz, 2000 Hz, 3000 Hz, 4000 Hz. There was a statistical improvement of hearing within all frequencies analyzed for the initial dose of prednisone above 50 mg. For an initial dose below 50 mg, in 4000 Hz, the improvement of hearing was statistically insignificant. The research demonstrated a significant influence of steroid therapy on treatment results in patients with Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss. Full article
Back to TopTop