Current Strategies and Future Directions in Menopause Management

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 December 2023) | Viewed by 2225

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, Granada University, Granada, Spain
Interests: menopause; female sexual health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Women's health related to menopause has been given a lot of visibility in recent years. Some countries are even legislating specifically on some of its most neglected aspects. Although menopause is a natural phenomenon, one third of women will experience a pathological experience, especially when it occurs before the age of 45 or when they suffer from premature ovarian insufficiency. The poorer quality of life is accompanied by other medical consequences of estrogen decline: osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline. Moreover, most postmenopausal women will suffer from the late consequences of hypoestrogenism on their genitourinary tissues (genitourinary syndrome of menopause).

On the other hand, treatments for the relief of the symptoms and consequences of menopause are gaining in efficacy and safety, although new data are always needed.

This special issue aims to update knowledge about women heath aspect related to menopause. We would like to invite you to publish original clinical research articles or systematic reviews focused on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of processes that worsen women's quality of life, menopausal therapies, or sexuality that will provide gynecologists and family physicians readers with a tool to update their knowledge on this topic.

Prof. Dr. Nicolás Mendoza Ladrón de Guevara
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • menopause
  • female sexual health
  • genitourinary syndrome of menopause
  • menopause hormone therapy
  • postmenopausal osteoporosis
  • violence against women

Published Papers (2 papers)

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12 pages, 1329 KiB  
Systematic Review
The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Depression and Sleep Problems for Climacteric Women: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Ji-Hyun Kim and Hea-Jin Yu
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(2), 412; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13020412 - 11 Jan 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: Women in their middle years undergoing perimenopause encounter a range of physical and psychological alterations attributed to hormonal changes. The prominent symptoms among menopausal women are depressive symptoms and sleep-related problems. The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Women in their middle years undergoing perimenopause encounter a range of physical and psychological alterations attributed to hormonal changes. The prominent symptoms among menopausal women are depressive symptoms and sleep-related problems. The aim of this study was to conduct a meta-analysis examining the effects of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) on women going through menopause, specifically focusing on depressive symptoms and sleep problems. We analyzed studies conducted both within the country and across international settings over the last decade. (2) Methods: A search of the literature was conducted—a targeted search, exclusively considering randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that were published within the timeframe spanning from 15 June 2013 to 15 June 2023. (3) Findings: Upon reviewing nine studies that satisfied our inclusion criteria and involved a total of 923 participants, it was noted that four of these studies incorporated diverse cognitive-behavioral strategies. Among the nine studies, a total of four were included in the meta-analysis: two measured depressive symptoms, and two measured sleep quality. The combined effect size for depressive symptoms was found to be 3.55 (95% confidence interval: −5.48, −1.61; p < 0.05), and for sleep quality, it was 0.78 (95% confidence interval: −1.32, −0.25; p = 0.004). (4) Conclusions: Our review emphasizes the necessity for conducting larger-scale studies focused on the application of CBT for women experiencing menopausal symptoms. Additionally, it is recommended to approach the interpretation of these results with caution due to discrepancies in methodology and the overall quality of the studies. Further clinical trials are necessary to establish the ideal number of CBT sessions needed for the effective treatment of depression in menopausal women. Future studies should cover a wider range of geographical locations, including more countries, and focus on various outcomes such as depressive symptoms and sleep quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Strategies and Future Directions in Menopause Management)
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15 pages, 668 KiB  
Systematic Review
Physical Exercise and Dietary Supplementation in Middle-Aged and Older Women: A Systematic Review
by Juan Carlos Sánchez-García, Daniel López Hernández, Beatriz Piqueras-Sola, Jonathan Cortés-Martín, Andrés Reinoso-Cobo, María José Menor-Rodríguez and Raquel Rodríguez-Blanque
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(23), 7271; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12237271 - 23 Nov 2023
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Abstract
With the aging of the population in developed countries, the number of middle-aged and older women is progressively increasing. During this stage, women suffer from a number of signs and symptoms that could be reduced or treated with physical exercise and dietary supplements. [...] Read more.
With the aging of the population in developed countries, the number of middle-aged and older women is progressively increasing. During this stage, women suffer from a number of signs and symptoms that could be reduced or treated with physical exercise and dietary supplements. The main objective of this study was to analyse the benefits of exercise and dietary supplements during menopause. Materials and methods: A systematic review of the scientific literature was performed according to the PRISMA 2020 protocol, searching the PubMed, Cochrane, Scopus, and WOS databases. Studies that met the inclusion criteria were assessed for methodological quality using the PEDro or AMSTAR-2 scales. Results: The searches yielded a total of 104 results, of which 10 were selected, with methodological quality ranging from fair to excellent. Each article examined the combination of a dietary supplement plan versus a placebo; plus an exercise routine versus another routine or a sedentary lifestyle. The results showed the benefits of combining a nutritional supplementation plan with an exercise routine during menopause. Conclusions: The practice of weekly strength and endurance exercises, together with the consumption of certain dietary supplements, may be a good resource for coping with menopause in a healthy way. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Strategies and Future Directions in Menopause Management)
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