Breast Cancer: Clinical Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 September 2024 | Viewed by 1155

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Radiation Oncology, Campus Bio-Medico University, 00128 Rome, Italy
Interests: breast cancer; lung cancer; radiotherapy; advanced technology; radiation induced toxicity; concomitant treatments

Special Issue Information

Dear Collegues,

Breast cancer treatment has significantly changed and expanded in the last few decades, mainly due to the increased understanding of the molecular factors contributing to breast cancer pathogenesis and heterogeneity. Although overall survival has improved due to advanced diagnostic modalities as well as the introduction of tailored treatements directed at specific patient populations, there is still room for improvement.

This Special Issue addresses the topic of precision medicine and novel research in the field of diagnosis, predictive biomarkers, loco-regional treatment (radiation and surgery), and systemic treatments.

Dr. Edy Ippolito
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • imaging biomarkers
  • molecular biomarkers
  • precision medicine
  • loco-regional treatment
  • breast surgery
  • breast radiotherapy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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23 pages, 5602 KiB  
Article
Traditional Clinicopathological Biomarkers Still Determine Disease-Free and Overall Survival in Invasive Breast Cancer Patients: A Pilot Study
by Katarzyna Wrzeszcz, Katarzyna Kwiatkowska, Piotr Rhone, Dorota Formanowicz, Stefan Kruszewski and Barbara Ruszkowska-Ciastek
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(7), 2021; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13072021 - 30 Mar 2024
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Abstract
Background: Molecular classification, tumor diameter, Ki67 expression, and brachytherapy administration still act as the most potent potential predictors of breast cancer recurrence and overall survival. Methods: Over the period of 23 months, we included in the study 92 invasive breast cancer (IBrC) patients [...] Read more.
Background: Molecular classification, tumor diameter, Ki67 expression, and brachytherapy administration still act as the most potent potential predictors of breast cancer recurrence and overall survival. Methods: Over the period of 23 months, we included in the study 92 invasive breast cancer (IBrC) patients initially diagnosed at the Clinical Ward of Breast Cancer and Reconstructive Surgery, Oncology Center in Bydgoszcz, Poland. The probability of disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in relation to potential prognostic factors for the patients were determined using a Kaplan–Meier analysis, and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses evaluated the predictive factors of IBrC patients. The investigation of the potential prognostic model’s accuracy was analyzed using the ROC curve. Results: Patients with tumor size < 2 cm, Ki67 expression < 20%, luminal-A molecular subtype, and extra-dose brachytherapy boost administration displayed the most favorable prognosis according to breast cancer disease-free survival and overall survival. The estimated 5 year probability of DFS and OS rates in women with tumor diameter < 2 cm were 89% and 90%, respectively. In tumor diameter > 2 cm, the estimated 5 year probability of DFS was 73% and OS was 76%. Interestingly, the tumor diameter of 1.6 cm with a specificity of 60.5% and a sensitivity of 75% occurred as the best threshold point to differentiate patients with cancer recurrence from those without cancer progression. Conclusions: Our study provides essential information on the clinicopathological profile and future outcomes of early stage IBrC patients. Furthermore, the tumor diameter cut-off value of 1.6 cm discriminating between disease recurrence and those without disease progression patients represents an innovative direction for further research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancer: Clinical Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy)
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12 pages, 2068 KiB  
Systematic Review
A Systematic Review to Evaluate the Barriers to Breast Cancer Screening in Women with Disability
by Huda I. Almohammed
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(11), 3283; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13113283 - 2 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background: Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. There are observed disparities in patients with disability as compared to those without disability, which leads to poor BC screening attendance, thereby worsening disease management. Aim: The aim of this [...] Read more.
Background: Breast cancer (BC) is one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. There are observed disparities in patients with disability as compared to those without disability, which leads to poor BC screening attendance, thereby worsening disease management. Aim: The aim of this systematic review is to investigate if there are disparities in screening rates in women with disability as compared to those without disability, as well as the different factors that pose barriers to patients with disability for enrolment in BC screening programs. Method: Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we systematically reviewed published articles between 2008 and 2023, which assessed different factors that contributed to poor attendance in BC screening programs held across different countries. Detailed study characteristics were obtained, and methodological quality assessment was performed on the individual studies included in this review. Result: A total of fifty-three articles were identified as eligible studies based on the pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. These included 7,252,913 patients diagnosed with BC (913,902 patients with disability/6,339,011 patients without disability). The results revealed there are demographic, clinical, financial, and service-related barriers that contributed to lower screening rates in disabled patients as compared to non-disabled. Patient age is the most common factor, with the highest effect observed for 80 years (vs. 30–44 years) [odds ratio (OR) = 13.93 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 8.27–23.47), p < 0.0001], followed by race/ethnicity for Hispanic (vs. non-Hispanic white) [OR = 9.5 (95%CI = 1.0–91.9), p < 0.05]. Additionally, patients with multiple disabilities had the highest rate of dropouts [OR = 27.4 (95%CI = 21.5–33.3)]. Other factors like education, income, marital status, and insurance coverage were essential barriers in screening programs. Conclusions: This study presents a holistic view of all barriers to poor BC screening attendance in disabled patients, thereby exacerbating health inequalities. A standardized approach to overcome the identified barriers and the need for a tailored guideline, especially for disability groups, is inevitable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Breast Cancer: Clinical Diagnosis and Personalized Therapy)
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