Acute Kidney Injury (AKI): Novel Strategies of Diagnosis and Treatments

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Nephrology & Urology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 May 2024 | Viewed by 686

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Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, Santa Marta and Santa Venera Hospital, 95024 Acireale, Catania, Italy
Interests: acute kidney injury; chronic kidney disease; cardio-renal syndromes
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a major complication in hospitalized and intensive care unit patients and is independently associated with short- and long-term mortality. Furthermore, AKI is associated with high morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of adverse outcomes after hospital discharge. After AKI, the incidences of chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease are increased. AKI is not a single disease but a series of heterogeneous syndromes, and if these lesions are left untreated, the patient's condition can worsen, resulting in complete loss of kidney function or death.

As there are many causes of acute kidney injury, more in-depth studies are still needed. For this Special Issue, we are calling on researchers and clinicians to submit valuable research on AKI to generate more knowledge and awareness of this issue, as has been done in nephrology, internal medicine, critical care, and other disciplines and skill areas.

Dr. Anna Clementi
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • acute kidney injury
  • acute renal failure
  • chronic kidney diseases
  • nephritis
  • critical care
  • renal replacement therapy
  • inflammation
  • risk factors
  • therapy
  • diagnosis
  • outcomes
  • predictors

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

13 pages, 994 KiB  
Article
Obesity and Acute Kidney Injury in Patients with ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction
by Vojko Kanic, David Suran and Gregor Kompara
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(23), 7311; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12237311 - 25 Nov 2023
Viewed by 550
Abstract
Background: Data on the association between obesity and acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are sparse and inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the association between obesity and AKI and the outcome in these patients. Methods: A retrospective observational [...] Read more.
Background: Data on the association between obesity and acute kidney injury (AKI) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) are sparse and inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the association between obesity and AKI and the outcome in these patients. Methods: A retrospective observational study of 3979 STEMI patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) was performed at a single center. Patients with and without AKI were compared. Patients were also divided into three categories according to BMI, and these were compared. All-cause mortality was determined at 30 days and over a median period of 7.0 years. Results: The incidence of AKI was similar in all BMI categories. There was no association between BMI categories and AKI (p = 0.089). The Spearman correlation coefficient between BMI categories and AKI showed no correlation (r = −0.005; p = 0.75). More AKI patients died within 30 days and in the long term [137 (18.5%) and 283 (38.1%) patients in the AKI group died compared to 118 (3.6%) and 767 (23.1%) in the non-AKI group; p < 0.0001]. AKI was harmful in all BMI categories (p < 0.0001) and was associated with more than a 2.5-fold and a 1.5-fold multivariable-adjusted 30-day and long-term mortality risk, respectively (aOR 2.59; 95% CI 1.84–3.64; p < 0.0001, aHR 1.54; 95% CI 1.32–1.80; p < 0.0001). BMI categories were not associated with 30-day mortality (p = 0.26) but were associated with long-term mortality (p < 0.0001). Overweight and obese patients had an approximately 25% lower long-term multivariable-adjusted risk of death than normal-weight patients. In patients with AKI, BMI was only associated with long-term risk (p = 0.022). Obesity had an additional beneficial effect in these patients, and only patients with obesity, but not overweight patients, had a lower multivariable adjusted long-term mortality risk than normal-weight patients (aHR 062; 95% CI 0.446–0.88 p = 0.007). Conclusions: In patients who experienced AKI, obesity had an additional positive modifying effect. Our data suggest that the incidence of AKI in STEMI patients is not BMI-dependent. Full article
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