Colorectal Cancer: Clinical Practices and Challenges

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 September 2024 | Viewed by 1184

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Division of Gastroenterology, Bon Secours Mercy Health, Toledo, OH 43608, USA
Interests: colon cancer screening; colonoscopy; esophagogastroduodenoscopy; gastrointestinal hemorrhage; inflammatory bowel disease
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer diagnosed in both men and women in the United States. A total of 106,970 and 46,050 new cases of colon and rectal cancer were diagnosed in 2023 in the United States, respectively. Colonoscopy is considered the gold standard screening modality for detecting cancer and precursor lesions such as adenomas and serrated lesions. Numerous other modalities are also used for diagnosing colon cancer, including stool-based tests, CT colonography, flexible sigmoidoscopy, etc. Each modality has its own advantages and shortfalls. Once diagnosed, the challenge is to assess the extent and spread of the disease and formulate effective and individualized management strategies. In this context, the aim of this Special Issue is to serve as a platform for addressing the relevant topics in this domain, including, but not limited to, the screening, detection, diagnosis and management of colorectal cancer. Manuscripts relating these topics are welcome, and priority will be given to high-quality original studies, well-conducted systematic reviews and meta-analyses, and comprehensive clinical reviews. In summary, the Special Issue aims to increase the knowledge of the readers and clinicians in managing colorectal cancer in their daily practice.

Dr. Muhammad Aziz
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • colon cancer
  • rectal cancer
  • colonoscopy
  • diagnosis
  • management
  • prevention
  • innovation
  • technology
  • artificial intelligence

Published Papers (2 papers)

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9 pages, 943 KiB  
Article
Temporal Trends in Mental Disorder Rates among Patients with Colorectal Cancer: A Comprehensive Analysis
by Christoph Roderburg, Sven H. Loosen, Catherine Leyh, Andreas Krieg, Sarah Krieg, Markus Jördens, Tom Luedde and Karel Kostev
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(13), 3649; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13133649 - 22 Jun 2024
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Abstract
Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) stands as one of the most prevalent and burdensome malignancies worldwide. Similar to other cancers, CRC has been associated with the development of psychiatric diseases, including anxiety and depression. However, temporal trends in psychiatric disorders rates within CRC patients [...] Read more.
Background: Colorectal cancer (CRC) stands as one of the most prevalent and burdensome malignancies worldwide. Similar to other cancers, CRC has been associated with the development of psychiatric diseases, including anxiety and depression. However, temporal trends in psychiatric disorders rates within CRC patients have not been investigated so far. Methods: The present study included 15,619 individuals with colorectal cancer and 78,095 propensity score-matched individuals without cancer, who were identified within the Disease Analyzer (IQVIA) database in Germany between 2005 and 2022. Cox regression analysis was conducted to assess the association between CHC and subsequent psychiatric diseases, including depression, anxiety disorders, and adjustment disorder, by period (2005–2010, 2011–2016, 2017–2022). Results: The 12-month cumulative incidence of any psychiatric disorder diagnosis in the CRC cohort increased from 6.3% in 2005–2010 to 8.2% in 2017–2022. The strongest increase was observed for reaction to severe stress and adjustment disorder (1.0% in 2005–2010 to 2.6% in 2017–2022). Notably, the strong increase in psychiatric disorders was not specific for cancer patients since a slight increase in psychiatric disorders was also observed in the non-cancer cohort. Regression analyses revealed that CRC was strongly and significantly associated with an increased risk of depression, anxiety disorders, reaction to severe stress and adjustment disorders, as well as any psychiatric disorder. Of note, the extent of the association was stronger in 2017–2022 compared to 2005–2010, clearly proving a “real” increase in the rates of psychiatric disorders over time. Conclusions: This study presents novel data from a large cohort of outpatients in Germany, providing strong evidence for an increase in psychiatric disorders in the recent years. These findings contribute to the existing body of literature and should trigger the recognition of psychiatric problems in cancer survivors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colorectal Cancer: Clinical Practices and Challenges)
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Systematic Review
Efficacy and Safety of Thermal Ablation after Endoscopic Mucosal Resection: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-Analysis
by Hossein Haghbin, Nuruddinkhodja Zakirkhodjaev, Rawish Fatima, Faisal Kamal and Muhammad Aziz
J. Clin. Med. 2024, 13(5), 1298; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm13051298 - 25 Feb 2024
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Abstract
(1) Background: Large colonic polyps during colonoscopy can be managed by Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). To decrease the polyp recurrence rate, thermal ablation methods like argon plasma coagulation (APC) and snare tip soft coagulation (STSC) have been introduced. We performed this network [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Large colonic polyps during colonoscopy can be managed by Endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR). To decrease the polyp recurrence rate, thermal ablation methods like argon plasma coagulation (APC) and snare tip soft coagulation (STSC) have been introduced. We performed this network meta-analysis to assess the efficacy and safety of these modalities. (2) Methods: We performed a comprehensive literature review, through 5 January 2024, of databases including Embase, PubMed, SciELO, KCI, Cochrane Central, and Web of Science. Using a random effects model, we conducted a frequentist approach network meta-analysis. The risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. Safety and efficacy endpoints including rates of recurrence, bleeding, perforation, and post polypectomy syndrome were compared. (3) Results: Our search yielded a total of 13 studies with 2686 patients. Compared to placebo, both APC (RR: 0.33 CI: 0.20–0.54, p < 0.01) and STSC (RR: 0.27, CI: 0.21–0.34, p < 0.01) showed decreased recurrence rates. On ranking, STSC showed the lowest recurrence rate, followed by APC and placebo. Regarding individual adverse events, there was no statistically significant difference between either of the thermal ablation methods and placebo. (4) Conclusions: We demonstrated the efficacy and safety of thermal ablation after EMR for decreasing recurrence of adenoma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Colorectal Cancer: Clinical Practices and Challenges)
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