Special Issue "Recent Advances in the Integrated Management of Stored Product Pests—From Research to Application"

A special issue of Insects (ISSN 2075-4450).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Panagiotis A. Eliopoulos
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Agriculture and Agricultural Technology, University of Thessaly, 41110 Larissa, Greece
Interests: biological control of crop pests; IPM methods; insect-plant interactions; stored product pests; precision agriculture methods in crop protection
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stored product protection has changed dramatically over the last two decades. The methyl-bromide phase-out, the pest resistance development against major chemicals, the continuous withdrawal of several common insecticides, the ongoing tightening of safety regulations, and the increasing consumer demand for clean and healthy foods have set the scene for increased global food security. Scientists around the world are trying to fill in the knowledge gap on the application of eco-friendly and cost-effective monitoring tools and control methods that can be used against pests in stored products.

This Special Issue will focus on up-to-date methods and tools for the detection, monitoring, and control of insect and mite pests in storage facilities. Authors are invited to submit research articles and review manuscripts on topics related to new approaches to stored product pest management and its use within an IPM framework including prevention methods (sanitation, pest exclusion, drying, packaging), detection and monitoring tools (trapping, pheromones, acoustic monitoring), chemical control (novel insecticides), biological control (predators, parasitoids, entomopathogens), physical control (heating, aeration, cooling, irradiation, modified atmospheres), and botanicals (essential oils, plant extracts).

Prof. Panagiotis A. Eliopoulos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Insects is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stored product pests
  • integrated pest management
  • novel insecticides
  • pest monitoring
  • biological control
  • physical control
  • botanicals
  • pheromones
  • trapping

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ιnteractions between Beauveria bassiana and Isaria fumosorosea and Their Hosts Sitophilus granarius (L.) and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)
Insects 2019, 10(10), 362; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100362 - 19 Oct 2019
Abstract
The interactions between the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana Balsamo (Vuillemin) (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) and the entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea (Wize) Brown and Smith (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) were examined on young adults of Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and S. oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Conidial suspensions [...] Read more.
The interactions between the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana Balsamo (Vuillemin) (Hypocreales: Cordycipitaceae) and the entomopathogenic fungus Isaria fumosorosea (Wize) Brown and Smith (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) were examined on young adults of Sitophilus granarius (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and S. oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Conidial suspensions of these entomopathogenic fungi were applied both separately and in combination, at three dosages, 104, 106, and 108 conidia/mL. Mortality of experimental adults was recorded daily for 15 days. An overall positive interaction between the pathogenic microorganisms was observed. Mean weevil mortality caused by the separate acting fungi, B. bassiana, ranged from 26.7% to 53.3% and from 36.6% to 63.3% for S. granarius and S. oryzae, respectively. The respective values for I. fumosorosea were 20.0%–53.3% and 46.7%–66.7%. The combined treatments showed a distinct interaction between the pathogens; for S. granarius, the interaction between the pathogens was additive in all combinations, whereas, for S. oryzae, the interaction was additive in seven and competitive in two of the combinations. Applying both entomopathogenic microorganisms may offer a method for weevil control that could be more effective than using each pathogen alone. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Ozone Effectiveness on Wheat Weevil Suppression: Preliminary Research
Insects 2019, 10(10), 357; https://doi.org/10.3390/insects10100357 - 18 Oct 2019
Abstract
Insect infestations within stored product facilities are a major concern to livestock and human food industries. Insect infestations in storage systems can result in economic losses of up to 20%. Furthermore, the presence of insects and their waste and remains in grain and [...] Read more.
Insect infestations within stored product facilities are a major concern to livestock and human food industries. Insect infestations in storage systems can result in economic losses of up to 20%. Furthermore, the presence of insects and their waste and remains in grain and stored foods may pose a health risk to humans and livestock. At present, pests in commercial storage are managed by a combination of different methods ranging from cleaning and cooling to treatment of the stored material with contact insecticides or fumigation. The availability of pesticides for the treatment of grain and other stored products is decreasing owing, in some cases, to environmental and safety concerns among consumers and society, thus emphasizing the need for alternative eco-friendly pest control methods. One of the potential methods is the use of ozone. Although the mechanism of action of ozone on insects is not completely known, the insect’s respiratory system is a likely the target of this gas. The main goal of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of ozone in the suppression of adult wheat weevils Sitophilus granarius. In the experiments conducted, different durations of ozone exposure were tested. In addition to ozone toxicity, the walking response and velocity of wheat weevils were investigated. The results showed the harmful effects of ozone on these insects. In addition to mortality, ozone also had negative effects on insect speed and mobility. The efficiency of the ozone treatment increased with increasing ozone exposure of insects. The ability of ozone to reduce the walking activity and velocity of treated insects is a positive feature in pest control in storage systems, thereby reducing the possibility of insects escaping from treated objects. The results of this investigation suggest that ozone has the potential to become a realistic choice for suppressing harmful insects in storage systems for humans and livestock, either alone or as a complement to other control methods. Full article
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