Special Issue "Seismic Resilient Infrastructures"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019) | Viewed by 13479

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sanjay Nimbalkar
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil & Environmental Engineering, FEIT, University of Technology Sydney, 15 Broadway, NSW 2007, Australia
Interests: transportation geotechnics; earthquake geotechnics; constitutive modeling of granular media; finite elements
Dr. Anindya Pain
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIR-Central Building Research Institute, Roorkee 247667, India
Interests: geotechnical earthquake engineering; seismic earth pressure problems; stability of municipal solid waste landfills; rock mechanics; slope stability analysis; landslides; numerical methods; pattern recognition problems
Dr. Qingsheng Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1 Engineering Dr. 2, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117576, Singapore
Interests: geotechnical earthquake engineering; ground improvement techniques; transport geotechnics; characterization of geo-materials; in-situ testing; instrumentation; retaining structures; constitutive and numerical modeling
Dr. Mohd Ahmad Syed
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester M13 9PL, UK
Interests: geotechnics; earthquake geotechnical engineering; geomechanics problems—numerical and analytical modelling (FEM, FDM, DEM, etc.); reinforced soil wall and slopes; ground engineering; waterfront retaining structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to ever-growing population, urbanization drives the demand for safe and sustainable infrastructure. Urban development and associated infrastructure investments are major sources of growth. However, earthquakes are one of nature’s most destructive hazards, able to cause substantial amount of damage to infrastructure in a very short period of time. Earthquakes contribute to serious losses, not only through direct vibratory damages to infrastructures, but also indirectly through triggering of secondary effects, such as settlement, liquefaction, landslides, tsunamis, flooding, tectonic subsidence, uplift and fires. Infrastructure systems vulnerable to earthquake hazards can be replaced, retrofitted, abandoned, or simply left alone. Appropriate seismic risk analyses and mitigation techniques are crucial to manage the impact of earthquakes on both existing and planned infrastructure. Retrofitting of infrastructures to improve seismic resilience while shifting the focus from risk-based to resilience-based approaches will ensure continuous functionality throughout their life. Various mechanistic and diagnostic approaches can be adopted for the seismic design to ensure both safety and sustainability. Infrastructure planning and design must evaluate risks and uncertainties while adopting innovative resilient materials as seismological, technological and human systems interact in increasingly uncertain and complex ways. A proper disaster management program can enhance the capacity to prepare for earthquakes in order to reduce the overall exposure and associated impacts.

The aim of this Special Issue is to present the current state-of-the-art knowledge in the fundamental as well as applied research addressing the effects of earthquakes on infrastructure system. The Special Issue will cover the innovative approaches to seismic design and new technologies for improving resiliency of infrastructures in an era of unprecedented earthquake events. We invite contributions from all infrastructure sectors, i.e., structure, transport, water, and energy. This Special Issue will accept various novel and original research topics related to infrastructure systems, including, but not limited to:

  • Disaster management
  • Soil dynamics and earthquake engineering
  • Risks and uncertainty
  • Infrastructure systems
  • Innovative resilient materials
  • Mechanistic and diagnostics approaches
  • Structural health monitoring
  • Seismic hazard analysis
  • Resilience and risk mitigation
  • Seismic retrofitting
  • Dynamic soil structure interaction
  • Sustainably-resilient structures

Dr. Sanjay Nimbalkar
Dr. Anindya Pain
Dr. Qingsheng Chen
Dr. Mohd Ahmad Syed
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • risk mitigation
  • vulnerability
  • disaster management
  • earthquakes
  • infrastructure
  • risk assessment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
A New Method to Evaluate the Post-Earthquake Performance and Safety of Reinforced Concrete Structural Frame Systems
Infrastructures 2020, 5(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures5020016 - 01 Feb 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2625
Abstract
This study examines the relation between maximum seismic displacements and residual displacements for reinforced concrete building structures. In order to achieve a reliable relationship between these critical structural parameters for the seismic performance of concrete buildings, an extensive parametric study is conducted by [...] Read more.
This study examines the relation between maximum seismic displacements and residual displacements for reinforced concrete building structures. In order to achieve a reliable relationship between these critical structural parameters for the seismic performance of concrete buildings, an extensive parametric study is conducted by examining the nonlinear behavior of numerous planar framed structures. In this work, dynamic inelastic analyses are executed to investigate the seismic behavior of two sets of frames. The first group consists of four planar frames which have been designed for seismic and vertical loads according to modern structural codes while the second group also consists of four frames, which have been designed for vertical loads only, in order to examine older structures that have been designed using codes with inadequate seismic provisions. These two sets of buildings are subjected to various earthquakes with different amplitudes in order to develop a large structural response databank. On the basis of this wide-ranging parametric investigation, after an appropriate statistical analysis, simple empirical expressions are proposed for a straightforward and efficient evaluation of maximum seismic displacements of reinforced concrete buildings structures from their permanent deformation. Permanent displacements can be measured in-situ after strong ground motions as a post-earthquake assessment. It can be concluded that the measure of permanent deformation can be efficiently used to estimate the post-seismic performance level of reinforced concrete buildings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Resilient Infrastructures)
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Article
Effect of Water Drawdown and Dynamic Loads on Piled Raft: Two-Dimensional Finite Element Approach
Infrastructures 2019, 4(4), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4040075 - 07 Dec 2019
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 3206
Abstract
The piled raft foundations are widely used in infrastructure built on soft soil to reduce the settlement and enhance the bearing capacity. However, these foundations pose a potential risk of failure, if dynamic traffic loading and ground conditions are not adequately accounted in [...] Read more.
The piled raft foundations are widely used in infrastructure built on soft soil to reduce the settlement and enhance the bearing capacity. However, these foundations pose a potential risk of failure, if dynamic traffic loading and ground conditions are not adequately accounted in the construction phase. The ground conditions are complex because of frequent groundwater fluctuations. The drawdown of the water table profoundly influences the settlement and load sharing capacity of piled raft foundation. Further, the dynamic loading can also pose a potential risk to these foundations. In this paper, the two-dimensional finite element method (FEM) is employed to analyze the impact of water drawdown and dynamic loading on the stability of piled raft. The seismic response of piled raft is also discussed. The stresses and deformations occurring in and around the raft structure are evaluated. The results demonstrate that water drawdown has a significant effect on the stability and seismic response of piled raft. Various foundation improvement methods are assessed, such as the use of geotextile and increasing thickness of the pile cap, which aids of limiting the settlement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Resilient Infrastructures)
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Article
Comparative Study of Seismic Design and Performance of OMRF Building Using Indian, British, and European Codes
Infrastructures 2019, 4(4), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4040071 - 19 Nov 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3797
Abstract
In India, damage cause by some major earthquakes, such as India/Nepal 2015, Sikkim 2011, Kashmir 2005, Bhuj 2001, Latur 1993, and Uttarkashi 1991, have raised alarms to professionals. The probability of seismic risk is higher in more densely populated Indian cities, such as [...] Read more.
In India, damage cause by some major earthquakes, such as India/Nepal 2015, Sikkim 2011, Kashmir 2005, Bhuj 2001, Latur 1993, and Uttarkashi 1991, have raised alarms to professionals. The probability of seismic risk is higher in more densely populated Indian cities, such as Bhuj, Kashmir, Sikkim, Uttarkashi, as they come under the highest seismicity zone in India. Therefore, our primary interest is to investigate the seismic performance evaluation of the buildings in these seismic prone areas. Significant research has been conducted on the seismic performance of existing buildings. However, investigations on the seismic performance of a building with different country codes for the same earthquake event has not been explored, which is crucial in providing a deeper knowledge of the seismic performance of buildings. This paper presents a comparative study of an Ordinary Moment Resistant Frame (OMRF) building designed using three major codes, Indian (IS: 456-2000, IS: 1893-2002), British (BS: 8110-1997) and European (EC-2, EC-8). Six typical building models considered with earthquake (WiEQ), and without earthquake (WoEQ), and their assessments were interpreted using non-linear static analysis for determining their seismic performance. Seismic performance is compared in terms of base shear coefficient (BSC) and drift ratio that shows WiEQ models, at the drift ratio of 1.5%, the BSC was as follows; 0.78, 0.88, and 0.96 for the models designed for British, Euro, and Indian codes, respectively. The results show that the building models, that have been designed for the Indian codal provisions for both cases, performed well as compared to the other country codes. Base shear and drift ratio are the vital parameters that vary considerably among the building models. This aspect of the Indian code makes it a safer design methodology with higher reserve strength and a reasonably good displacement capacity before reaching the Collapse Prevention (CP) performance level. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Resilient Infrastructures)
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Article
Stability Assessment of Earth Retaining Structures under Static and Seismic Conditions
Infrastructures 2019, 4(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures4020015 - 09 Apr 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3429
Abstract
An accurate estimation of static and seismic earth pressures is extremely important in geotechnical design. The conventional Coulomb’s approach and Mononobe-Okabe’s approach have been widely used in engineering practice. However, the latter approach provides the linear distribution of seismic earth pressure behind a [...] Read more.
An accurate estimation of static and seismic earth pressures is extremely important in geotechnical design. The conventional Coulomb’s approach and Mononobe-Okabe’s approach have been widely used in engineering practice. However, the latter approach provides the linear distribution of seismic earth pressure behind a retaining wall in an approximate way. Therefore, the pseudo-dynamic method can be used to compute the distribution of seismic active earth pressure in a more realistic manner. The effect of wall and soil inertia must be considered for the design of a retaining wall under seismic conditions. The method proposed considers the propagation of shear and primary waves through the backfill soil and the retaining wall due to seismic excitation. The crude estimate of finding the approximate seismic acceleration makes the pseudo-static approach often unreliable to adopt in the stability assessment of retaining walls. The predictions of the active earth pressure using Coulomb theory are not consistent with the laboratory results to the development of arching in the backfill soil. A new method is proposed to compute the active earth pressure acting on the backface of a rigid retaining wall undergoing horizontal translation. The predictions of the proposed method are verified against results of laboratory tests as well as the results from other methods proposed in the past. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Resilient Infrastructures)
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