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Special Issue "Wheat and Barley: Acclimatization to Abiotic and Biotic Stress"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Tomasz Hura
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Polish Academy of Sciences, The Franciszek Górski Institute of Plant Physiology, Poland
Interests: cereals (wheat, barley, triticale), abiotic stress (drought stress, salinity, heat stress), biotic stress (fungi), plant stress physiology, plant molecular biology, invasive plants

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,
Agriculture is an aspect of human activity that is highly dependent on the weather and climatic conditions. Climatic changes and associated extreme weather phenomena are posing new and unpredictable threats to cereal crops. Therefore, farmers are becoming increasingly interested in growing cultivars that are able to acclimate to environmental stresses at key stages of their growth and development.

Wheat and barley are critical food crops around the world, and their cultivars will face unexpected climatic changes. Flooding, drought, high temperatures, salinity, or excessive UV radiation during the growing season can significantly reduce their yields. Furthermore, climate change can influence pathogen development and survival rates, disease transmission, host susceptibility, and disease-spreading organisms.

This Special Issue of IJMS aims to publish a collection of recent studies dealing with the molecular aspects of wheat and barley acclimatization to abiotic and biotic stresses including observations of biochemical, physiological, and morphological responses. Authors are invited to submit related original research articles, reviews and communications.

Dr. Tomasz Hura
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • barley
  • wheat
  • abiotic stress (drought, heat, salinity, cold, UV radiation, flooding)
  • biotic stress (bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, insects, weeds)
  • multi-stress
  • genes and proteins
  • transcriptome
  • proteome
  • metabolome

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Disclosure of the Molecular Mechanism of Wheat Leaf Spot Disease Caused by Bipolaris sorokiniana through Comparative Transcriptome and Metabolomics Analysis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 6090; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20236090 - 03 Dec 2019
Abstract
Wheat yield is greatly reduced because of the occurrence of leaf spot diseases. Bipolaris sorokiniana is the main pathogenic fungus in leaf spot disease. In this study, B. sorokiniana from wheat leaf (W-B. sorokiniana) showed much stronger pathogenicity toward wheat than [...] Read more.
Wheat yield is greatly reduced because of the occurrence of leaf spot diseases. Bipolaris sorokiniana is the main pathogenic fungus in leaf spot disease. In this study, B. sorokiniana from wheat leaf (W-B. sorokiniana) showed much stronger pathogenicity toward wheat than endophytic B. sorokiniana from Pogostemon cablin (P-B. sorokiniana). The transcriptomes and metabolomics of the two B. sorokiniana strains and transcriptomes of B. sorokiniana-infected wheat leaves were comparatively analyzed. In addition, the expression levels of unigenes related to pathogenicity, toxicity, and cell wall degradation were predicted and validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis. Results indicated that pathogenicity-related genes, especially the gene encoding loss-of-pathogenicity B (LopB) protein, cell wall-degrading enzymes (particularly glycosyl hydrolase-related genes), and killer and Ptr necrosis toxin-producing related unigenes in the W-B. sorokiniana played important roles in the pathogenicity of W-B. sorokiniana toward wheat. The down-regulation of cell wall protein, photosystem peptide, and rubisco protein suggested impairment of the phytosynthetic system and cell wall of B. sorokiniana-infected wheat. The up-regulation of hydrolase inhibitor, NAC (including NAM, ATAF1 and CUC2) transcriptional factor, and peroxidase in infected wheat tissues suggests their important roles in the defensive response of wheat to W-B. sorokiniana. This is the first report providing a comparison of the transcriptome and metabolome between the pathogenic and endophytic B. sorokiniana strains, thus providing a molecular clue for the pathogenic mechanism of W-B. sorokiniana toward wheat and wheat’s defensive response mechanism to W-B. sorokiniana. Our study could offer molecular clues for controlling the hazard of leaf spot and root rot diseases in wheat, thus improving wheat yield in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wheat and Barley: Acclimatization to Abiotic and Biotic Stress)
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Open AccessArticle
Genetic Parameters and QTLs for Total Phenolic Content and Yield of Wheat Mapping Population of CSDH Lines under Drought Stress
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(23), 6064; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20236064 - 01 Dec 2019
Abstract
A doubled haploid population of 94 lines from the Chinese Spring × SQ1 wheat cross (CSDH) was used to evaluate additive and epistatic gene action effects on total phenolic content, grain yield of the main stem, grain number per plant, thousand grain weight, [...] Read more.
A doubled haploid population of 94 lines from the Chinese Spring × SQ1 wheat cross (CSDH) was used to evaluate additive and epistatic gene action effects on total phenolic content, grain yield of the main stem, grain number per plant, thousand grain weight, and dry weight per plant at harvest based on phenotypic and genotypic observations of CSDH lines. These traits were evaluated under moderate and severe drought stress and compared with well-watered plants. Plants were grown in pots in an open-sided greenhouse. Genetic parameters, such as additive and epistatic effects, affecting total phenolic content, were estimated for eight year-by-drought combinations. Twenty-one markers showed a significant additive effect on total phenolic content in all eight year-by-drought combinations. These markers were located on chromosomes: 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 2D, 3A, 3B, 3D, 4A, and 4D. A region on 4AL with a stable QTL controlling the phenolic content, confirmed by various statistical methods is particularly noteworthy. In all years and treatments, three markers significantly linked to QTLs have been identified for both phenols and yield. Thirteen markers were coincident with candidate genes. Our results indicated the importance of both additive and epistatic gene effects on total phenolic content in eight year-by-drought combinations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wheat and Barley: Acclimatization to Abiotic and Biotic Stress)
Open AccessArticle
Biosynthesis of Phenylamide Phytoalexins in Pathogen-Infected Barley
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(22), 5541; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20225541 - 06 Nov 2019
Abstract
Phytoalexins are inducible antimicrobial metabolites in plants, and have been indicated to be important for the rejection of microbial infection. HPLC analysis detected the induced accumulation of three compounds 13 in barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots infected by Fusarium culmorum [...] Read more.
Phytoalexins are inducible antimicrobial metabolites in plants, and have been indicated to be important for the rejection of microbial infection. HPLC analysis detected the induced accumulation of three compounds 13 in barley (Hordeum vulgare) roots infected by Fusarium culmorum, the causal agent of Fusarium root rot. Compounds 13 were identified as cinnamic acid amides of 9-hydroxy-8-oxotryptamine, 8-oxotryptamine, and (1H-indol-3-yl)methylamine, respectively, by spectroscopic analysis. Compounds 1 and 2 had been previously reported from wheat, whereas 3 was an undescribed compound. We named 13 as triticamides A–C, respectively, because they were isolated from barley and wheat, which belong to the Triticeae tribe. These compounds showed antimicrobial activities, indicating that triticamides function as phytoalexins in barley. The administration of deuterium-labeled N-cinnamoyl tryptamine (CinTry) to barley roots resulted in the effective incorporation of CinTry into 1 and 2, which suggested that they were synthesized through the oxidation of CinTry. Nine putative tryptamine hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (THT)-encoding genes (HvTHT1HvTHT9) were identified by database search on the basis of homology to known THT gene sequences from rice. Since HvTHT7 and HvTHT8 had the same sequences except one base, we measured their expression levels in total by RT-qPCR. HvTHT7/8 were markedly upregulated in response to infection by F. culmorum. The HvTHT7 and HvTHT8 enzymes preferred cinnamoyl- and feruloyl-CoAs as acyl donors and tryptamine as an acyl acceptor, and (1H-indol-3-yl)methylamine was also accepted as an acyl acceptor. These findings suggested that HvTHT7/8 are responsible for the induced accumulation of triticamides in barley. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wheat and Barley: Acclimatization to Abiotic and Biotic Stress)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Candidate genes for freezing and drought tolerance selected on the basis of proteome analysis in doubled haploid lines of barley
Author: Dr. Magdalena Wójcik-Jagła
Affiliation: University of Agriculture, Kraków, Poland

Title: Osmotic stress and n-butanol induce bread wheat microspore embryogenesis by rearrangement of α-tubulin in microtubules
Author: Prof. Ewa Dubas
Affiliation: Institute of Plant Physiology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Kraków, Poland

Title: Abscisic acid - enemy or saviour in cereals response to biotic and abiotic stresses
Author: Dr. Marta Gietler
Affiliation: Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Poland

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