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Special Issue "Nanotherapeutics in Cancer"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Oncology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Biana Godin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, 6670Bertner Ave., R8-213, Houston, TX, USA
Interests: employing principles of nanomedicine in Ob/Gyn; targeting liver metastasis with advanced nanocarriers; novel strategies to target tumor microenvironment; advanced patient-derived ex vivo disease models for personalized therapies; exosomes

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tumor initiation, growth, and progression rely on the bidirectional interaction of the tumor cells with cellular and noncellular elements in the tumor microenvironment (TME). During the past two decades, extensive studies of the TME biology and its important role in disease progression and prognosis have provided a stage for the design of novel cancer nanomedicines. Significant aberrations in the TME as compared to the normal tissue, such as changes in the structure of the newly formed blood vessels, increased population of the immune cells, the acidic pH, alterations in the redox potential, and up- and down-regulation of membranal and secreted proteins, have ignited the research of passively targeted and stimulus-responsive nanomedicines for more efficient cancer diagnosis and therapy. Clinically used nanotherapeutics, such as liposomal doxorubicin (e.g., Doxil®) and nanoparticle-albumin bound paclitaxel (Abraxane®), utilize changes in the TME, such as the neovasculature-based enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect and increased albumin transport, to promote the delivery of chemotherapeutics to the tumor cells. More specific delivery of therapeutics to tumors using concepts of nanomedicine generally yields much better safety profiles and more efficient anti-cancer therapies. In the current Special Issue, entitled “Nanotherapeutics in Cancer”, we aim to cover a collection of current research papers and up-to-date review articles focusing on various aspects of the design of nanomedicines specifically targeted to enhance the safety and efficacy of tumor therapies.

Dr. Biana Godin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomedicine
  • cancer nanomedicine
  • tumor microenvironment
  • tumor stroma
  • targeted nanotherapies
  • cancer nanomedicine
  • enhanced permeation and retention effect
  • targeting immune cells
  • endothelial cells
  • stimuli-responsive nanovectors
  • nanoparticles

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Treatment with Gold Nanoparticles Using Cudrania tricuspidata Root Extract Induced Downregulation of MMP-2/-9 and PLD1 and Inhibited the Invasiveness of Human U87 Glioblastoma Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(4), 1282; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21041282 - 14 Feb 2020
Abstract
In this study, we aimed to elucidate the anti-invasive effects of Cudrania tricuspidata root-gold nanoparticles (CTR-GNPs) using glioblastoma cells. We demonstrated the rapid synthesis of CTR-GNPs using UV-vis spectra. The surface morphology, crystallinity, reduction, capsulation, and stabilization of CTR-GNPs were analyzed using high [...] Read more.
In this study, we aimed to elucidate the anti-invasive effects of Cudrania tricuspidata root-gold nanoparticles (CTR-GNPs) using glioblastoma cells. We demonstrated the rapid synthesis of CTR-GNPs using UV-vis spectra. The surface morphology, crystallinity, reduction, capsulation, and stabilization of CTR-GNPs were analyzed using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Furthermore, CTR-GNPs displayed excellent photocatalytic activity as shown by the photo-degradation of methylene blue and rhodamine B. Cell migration and invasion assays with human glioblastoma cells were performed to investigate the anti-invasive effect of CTR-GNPs on U87 cells that were treated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The results show that CTR-GNPs can significantly inhibit both basal and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced migration and invasion ability. Importantly, treatment with CTR-GNPs significantly decreased the levels of metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/-9 and phospholipase D1 (PLD1) and protein but not PLD2, which is involved in the modulation of migration and the invasion of glioblastoma cells. These results present a novel mechanism showing that CTR-GNPs can attenuate the migration and invasion of glioblastoma cells induced by PMA through transcriptional and translational regulation of MMP-2/-9 and PLD1. Taken together, our results suggest that CTR-GNPs might be an excellent therapeutic alternative for wide range of glioblastomas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanotherapeutics in Cancer)
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