ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Nanomaterials in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Salvatore Gallo
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Milan, 20133 Milan, Italy
Interests: applied physics; medical physics; polymer; dosimetry; material sciences
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesca Brero
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Physics, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: applied physics; nanomaterials; magnetism; magnetic nanoparticles

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Advances in nanotechnology throughout the latest years have paved the way for the development of new methods to diagnose and treat cancers.

Nanomaterials offer a wide gamut of interesting properties, such as the possibility of getting close to the biological entity of interest or that of being easily brought inside the patient's body.

For nanomaterials to be applies, a combination of different scientific branches is often required, among them biology, chemistry, physics, medicine and engineering. The goal is to develop new tools that might increase the quality of diagnostic images, increase the effectiveness of anticancer treatments.

This special issue is a thorough collection of articles dealing with the synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials, of which the author shows the mechanisms of action and possible applications for therapy and/or diagnosis, both in vitro and in vivo.

For this purpose, content includes basic, translational, and clinical research addressing diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, prediction, and prevention of diseases.

Furthermore, the overview presented in this Special Issue would not be complete without mentioning novel approaches for the characterization and modelling of nanomaterials for medical applications.

Thus, manuscripts on the application of nanotechnology in medical physics and concerning combined therapies are also welcome.

Publication of original research articles, rapid communications or reviews in this Special Issue will make an important contribution to developing nanotechnology-based cancer therapies and diagnosis.

Dr. Salvatore Gallo
Dr. Francesca Brero
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanomaterials
  • Nanoparticles
  • Theranostics
  • Diagnosis
  • Cancer Therapy
  • Synthesis and characterization
  • Health sciences
  • Drug Delivery
  • Functionalization
  • Biocompatibility

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Study on Maximum Specific Loss Power in Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Decorated with Biocompatible Gamma-Cyclodextrins for Cancer Therapy with Superparamagnetic Hyperthermia
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(18), 10071; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221810071 - 17 Sep 2021
Viewed by 411
Abstract
Different chemical agents are used for the biocompatibility and/or functionality of the nanoparticles used in magnetic hyperthermia to reduce or even eliminate cellular toxicity and to limit the interaction between them (van der Waals and magnetic dipolar interactions), with highly beneficial effects on [...] Read more.
Different chemical agents are used for the biocompatibility and/or functionality of the nanoparticles used in magnetic hyperthermia to reduce or even eliminate cellular toxicity and to limit the interaction between them (van der Waals and magnetic dipolar interactions), with highly beneficial effects on the efficiency of magnetic hyperthermia in cancer therapy. In this paper we propose an innovative strategy for the biocompatibility of these nanoparticles using gamma-cyclodextrins (γ-CDs) to decorate the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles. The influence of the biocompatible organic layer of cyclodextrins, from the surface of Fe3O4 ferrimagnetic nanoparticles, on the maximum specific loss power in superparamagnetic hyperthermia, is presented and analyzed in detail in this paper. Furthermore, our study shows the optimum conditions in which the magnetic nanoparticles covered with gamma-cyclodextrin (Fe3O4–γ-CDs) can be utilized in superparamagnetic hyperthermia for an alternative cancer therapy with higher efficiency in destroying tumoral cells and eliminating cellular toxicity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Functionalization of Photosensitized Silica Nanoparticles for Advanced Photodynamic Therapy of Cancer
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(12), 6618; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22126618 - 21 Jun 2021
Viewed by 877
Abstract
BODIPY dyes have recently attracted attention as potential photosensitizers. In this work, commercial and novel photosensitizers (PSs) based on BODIPY chromophores (haloBODIPYs and orthogonal dimers strategically designed with intense bands in the blue, green or red region of the visible spectra and high [...] Read more.
BODIPY dyes have recently attracted attention as potential photosensitizers. In this work, commercial and novel photosensitizers (PSs) based on BODIPY chromophores (haloBODIPYs and orthogonal dimers strategically designed with intense bands in the blue, green or red region of the visible spectra and high singlet oxygen production) were covalently linked to mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) further functionalized with PEG and folic acid (FA). MSNs approximately 50 nm in size with different functional groups were synthesized to allow multiple alternatives of PS-PEG-FA decoration of their external surface. Different combinations varying the type of PS (commercial Rose Bengal, Thionine and Chlorine e6 or custom-made BODIPY-based), the linkage design, and the length of PEG are detailed. All the nanosystems were physicochemically characterized (morphology, diameter, size distribution and PS loaded amount) and photophysically studied (absorption capacity, fluorescence efficiency, and singlet oxygen production) in suspension. For the most promising PS-PEG-FA silica nanoplatforms, the biocompatibility in dark conditions and the phototoxicity under suitable irradiation wavelengths (blue, green, or red) at regulated light doses (10–15 J/cm2) were compared with PSs free in solution in HeLa cells in vitro. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Article
Tailored-Made Polydopamine Nanoparticles to Induce Ferroptosis in Breast Cancer Cells in Combination with Chemotherapy
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(6), 3161; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22063161 - 19 Mar 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 725
Abstract
Ferroptosis is gaining followers as mechanism of selective killing cancer cells in a non-apoptotic manner, and novel nanosystems capable of inducing this iron-dependent death are being increasingly developed. Among them, polydopamine nanoparticles (PDA NPs) are arousing interest, since they have great capability of [...] Read more.
Ferroptosis is gaining followers as mechanism of selective killing cancer cells in a non-apoptotic manner, and novel nanosystems capable of inducing this iron-dependent death are being increasingly developed. Among them, polydopamine nanoparticles (PDA NPs) are arousing interest, since they have great capability of chelating iron. In this work, PDA NPs were loaded with Fe3+ at different pH values to assess the importance that the pH may have in determining their therapeutic activity and selectivity. In addition, doxorubicin was also loaded to the nanoparticles to achieve a synergist effect. The in vitro assays that were performed with the BT474 and HS5 cell lines showed that, when Fe3+ was adsorbed in PDA NPs at pH values close to which Fe(OH)3 begins to be formed, these nanoparticles had greater antitumor activity and selectivity despite having chelated a smaller amount of Fe3+. Otherwise, it was demonstrated that Fe3+ could be released in the late endo/lysosomes thanks to their acidic pH and their Ca2+ content, and that when Fe3+ was co-transported with doxorubicin, the therapeutic activity of PDA NPs was enhanced. Thus, reported PDA NPs loaded with both Fe3+ and doxorubicin may constitute a good approach to target breast tumors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Nanoparticles Targeting Innate Immune Cells in Tumor Microenvironment
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(18), 10009; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms221810009 - 16 Sep 2021
Viewed by 431
Abstract
A variety of innate immune cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, natural killer cells, and neutrophils in the tumor microenvironments, contribute to tumor progression. However, while several recent reports have studied the use of immune checkpoint-based cancer immunotherapy, little work [...] Read more.
A variety of innate immune cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, natural killer cells, and neutrophils in the tumor microenvironments, contribute to tumor progression. However, while several recent reports have studied the use of immune checkpoint-based cancer immunotherapy, little work has focused on modulating the innate immune cells. This review focuses on the recent studies and challenges of using nanoparticles to target innate immune cells. In particular, we also examine the immunosuppressive properties of certain innate immune cells that limit clinical benefits. Understanding the cross-talk between tumors and innate immune cells could contribute to the development of strategies for manipulating the nanoparticles targeting tumor microenvironments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Electrochemical Sensors for Detection of Markers on Tumor Cells
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(15), 8184; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22158184 - 30 Jul 2021
Viewed by 481
Abstract
In recent years, the increasing incidence and mortality of cancer have inspired the development of accurate and rapid early diagnosis methods in order to successfully cure cancer; however, conventional methods used for detecting tumor cells, including histopathological and immunological methods, often involve complex [...] Read more.
In recent years, the increasing incidence and mortality of cancer have inspired the development of accurate and rapid early diagnosis methods in order to successfully cure cancer; however, conventional methods used for detecting tumor cells, including histopathological and immunological methods, often involve complex operation processes, high analytical costs, and high false positive rates, in addition to requiring experienced personnel. With the rapid emergence of sensing techniques, electrochemical cytosensors have attracted wide attention in the field of tumor cell detection because of their advantages, such as their high sensitivity, simple equipment, and low cost. These cytosensors are not only able to differentiate tumor cells from normal cells, but can also allow targeted protein detection of tumor cells. In this review, the research achievements of various electrochemical cytosensors for tumor cell detection reported in the past five years are reviewed, including the structures, detection ranges, and detection limits of the cytosensors. Certain trends and prospects related to the electrochemical cytosensors are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials in Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop