ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Macrophages in Inflammation 2019

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Biochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2019) | Viewed by 11745

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
University of Montana Missoula, Department of Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
Interests: nanoparticles; particulate matter; asbestos; silica; alveolar macrophages; innate immunity; NLRP3 inflammasome; macrophage receptors; lysosomes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Center for Environmental Health Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, MT 59812, USA
Interests: respiratory immunity; fibrosis; inflammation; autoimmune diseases; particle exposures
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Toxicology and Biochemistry Section NIOH, P O Box 4788 Johannesburg 2000, Reader Professor: School of Pathology, University of the Witwatersrand; South Africa
Interests: nanomaterials; silica; asbestos; nanotoxicology; in vitro methodologies; risk assessment; occupational toxicology; macrophages; lysosomes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Macrophages are involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses to regulate both acute and chronic inflammation. Macrophages have been recognized as key regulators of many diseases. They are plastic and respond to their microenvironments with amazing adaptability and function. Therefore, based on their key roles in regulating inflammation, it is important to bring together the most current information to identify gaps of knowledge that need to be filled in understanding how their many functions are regulated in order to assist and guide future research to treat human diseases. This Special Issue will include studies that describe their responses to endogenous and exogenous triggers that result in lysosomal membrane permeabilization and subsequent activation of the inflammatory response and other consequences. Studies are also encouraged on molecular events regulating lysosomal membrane permeability and therapeutic approaches to control these events.  In addition, new information on the regulation of macrophage plasticity including the possible role of autophagy and therapeutic regulation of autophagy impacts on macrophage phenotypes. Finally, new information on the contribution of sex (receptors and hormones) on regulating the macrophage inflammatory response.

Prof. Dr. Andrij Holian
Dr. Christopher Migliaccio
Prof. Dr. Mary Gulumian
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • acute inflammation chronic inflammation
  • macrophage phenotypes
  • macrophage function in diseases
  • therapeutic approaches
  • lysosome permeabilization and inflammasomes in macrophage function

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

14 pages, 10173 KiB  
Article
NIRF-Molecular Imaging with Synovial Macrophages-Targeting Vsig4 Nanobody for Disease Monitoring in a Mouse Model of Arthritis
by Fang Zheng, Siyu Luo, Zhenlin Ouyang, Jinhong Zhou, Huanye Mo, Steve Schoonooghe, Serge Muyldermans, Patrick De Baetselier, Geert Raes and Yurong Wen
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(13), 3347; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20133347 - 8 Jul 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4619
Abstract
Nanobody against V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (Vsig4) on tissue macrophages, such as synovial macrophages, could visualize joint inflammation in multiple experimental arthritis models via single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Here, we further addressed the specificity and assessed the potential for arthritis monitoring [...] Read more.
Nanobody against V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (Vsig4) on tissue macrophages, such as synovial macrophages, could visualize joint inflammation in multiple experimental arthritis models via single-photon emission computed tomography imaging. Here, we further addressed the specificity and assessed the potential for arthritis monitoring using near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) Cy7-labeled Vsig4 nanobody (Cy7-Nb119). In vivo NIRF-imaging of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was performed using Cy7-Nb119. Signals obtained with Cy7-Nb119 or isotope control Cy7-NbBCII10 were compared in joints of naive mice versus CIA mice. In addition, pathological microscopy and fluorescence microscopy were used to validate the arthritis development in CIA. Cy7-Nb119 accumulated in inflamed joints of CIA mice, but not the naive mice. Development of symptoms in CIA was reflected in increased joint accumulation of Cy7-Nb119, which correlated with the conventional measurements of disease. Vsig4 is co-expressed with F4/80, indicating targeting of the increasing number of synovial macrophages associated with the severity of inflammation by the Vsig4 nanobody. NIRF imaging with Cy7-Nb119 allows specific assessment of inflammation in experimental arthritis and provides complementary information to clinical scoring for quantitative, non-invasive and economical monitoring of the pathological process. Nanobody labelled with fluorescence can also be used for ex vivo validation experiments using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Macrophages in Inflammation 2019)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

16 pages, 1856 KiB  
Review
Role of Nephronectin in Pathophysiology of Silicosis
by Suni Lee, Machiko Honda, Shoko Yamamoto, Naoko Kumagai-Takei, Kei Yoshitome, Yasumitsu Nishimura, Nagisa Sada, Shigeyuki Kon and Takemi Otsuki
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(10), 2581; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20102581 - 26 May 2019
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 6635
Abstract
Silicosis is a typical form of pneumoconiosis and is characterized as a type of lung fibrosis. Silica particles are captured and recognized upon by alveolar macrophages via the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) scavenger receptor, and thereafter the inflammasome is activated. Thereafter, [...] Read more.
Silicosis is a typical form of pneumoconiosis and is characterized as a type of lung fibrosis. Silica particles are captured and recognized upon by alveolar macrophages via the macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO) scavenger receptor, and thereafter the inflammasome is activated. Thereafter, various chemokines/cytokines play their roles to eventually form fibrosis. Additionally, silica particles chronically activate T helper cells which sets the background for the formation of silicosis-associated autoimmune disturbances. The occurrence and progression of lung fibrosis, the extracellular matrix-related molecules such as integrins and their ligands including fibronectin, vitronectin, laminin, and collagens, all play important roles. Here, the roles of these molecules in silicosis-related lung fibrosis are reviewed from the literature. Additionally, the measurement of serum nephronectin (Npnt), a new member of the integrin family of ligands, is discussed, together with investigations attempting to delineate the role of Npnt in silica-induced lung fibrosis. Serum Npnt was found to be higher in silicosis patients compared to healthy volunteers and seems to play a role in the progression of fibrosis with other cytokines. Therefore, serum Npnt levels may be employed as a suitable marker to monitor the progression of fibrosis in silicosis patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Macrophages in Inflammation 2019)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop