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Special Issue "Glycosylation-Based Biomarkers in Diseases and Drug Delivery"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Julia Costa
Website
Guest Editor
Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras, Portugal
Interests: Protein glycosylation; biomarkers; glyco(proteo)mics; extracellular vesicles; glycosyltransferases; amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; cerebrospinal fluid; neurodegeneration; cancer
Prof. Dr. Salomé S. Pinho
Website
Co-Guest Editor
Institute for Research and Innovation in Health (i3S), University of Porto, Portugal
Interests: Protein glycosylation; glycans; glycoproteomics; glycobiomarkers; glycoimmunology; oncobiology; Inflammation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Glycoconjugates, such as, glycoproteins, proteoglycans and glycolipids, are major components of cells and organisms. A high diversity of glycan structures are present in different cellular types, being involved in major cellular and molecular processes both in homeostasis and in diseases. Therefore, specific glycosignatures displayed by cells, tissues or biofluids constitute valuable biomarkers of disease with important clinical applications. In the field of cancer changes in glycosylation have long been recognized and, consequently, several glycan-based biomarkers have been identified. For other diseases, such as inflammation and neurological diseases, the potential of glycosylation as biomarker is also relevant.

Glycans mediate cell recognition events (e.g., by immune cells) through their interaction with lectins and receptors, which provide potential tools for drug delivery onto specific target cells, acting also as promising vaccines. In this context, glycosyltransferases and glycosidases, enzymes that participate in the biosynthesis of glycans in vivo, constitute useful tools for glycosylation remodeling.

This Special issue will include papers addressing glycoconjugates/glycosylation as relevant disease biomarkers that can aid in diagnosis and prognosis. The role of glycans in the understanding of disease ethiopathogenesis and as promising targets for new therapies in context of precision medicine are considered. Furthermore, studies on glycosylation for the improvement of targeted drug delivery are welcome.

Dr. Júlia Costa

Prof. Salomé S. Pinho

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Glycan-based biomarkers for disease (particularly, cancer, neurodegeneration, chronic inflammatory diseases, neurological disorders, inflammation, autoimmunity, congenital disorders of glycosylation).
  • Glycans in the immune system.
  • Glyco(proteo)mics strategies for novel biomarker identification.
  • Glycosylation and metabolomics in disease.
  • Glycoconjugates/glycosylation from extracellular vesicles as biomarkers and implications in delivery.
  • Glycoengineering of nanoparticle surfaces aiming at improved delivery.
  • Lectins and glycan receptors in recognition mechanisms and diagnosis.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
N-Glycoproteins Have a Major Role in MGL Binding to Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines: Associations with Overall Proteome Diversity
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(15), 5522; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21155522 - 01 Aug 2020
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second-leading cause of cancer death worldwide due in part to a high proportion of patients diagnosed at advanced stages of the disease. For this reason, many efforts have been made towards new approaches for early detection and prognosis. [...] Read more.
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second-leading cause of cancer death worldwide due in part to a high proportion of patients diagnosed at advanced stages of the disease. For this reason, many efforts have been made towards new approaches for early detection and prognosis. Cancer-associated aberrant glycosylation, especially the Tn and STn antigens, can be detected using the macrophage galactose-type C-type lectin (MGL/CLEC10A/CD301), which has been shown to be a promising tool for CRC prognosis. We had recently identified the major MGL-binding glycoproteins in two high-MGL-binding CRC cells lines, HCT116 and HT29. However, we failed to detect the presence of O-linked Tn and STn glycans on most CRC glycoproteins recognized by MGL. We therefore investigated here the impact of N-linked and O-linked glycans carried by these proteins for the binding to MGL. In addition, we performed quantitative proteomics to study the major differences in proteins involved in glycosylation in these cells. Our results showed that N-glycans have a significant, previously underestimated, importance in MGL binding to CRC cell lines. Finally, we highlighted both common and cell-specific processes associated with a high-MGL-binding phenotype, such as differential levels of enzymes involved in protein glycosylation, and a transcriptional factor (CDX-2) involved in their regulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glycosylation-Based Biomarkers in Diseases and Drug Delivery)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
C-Type Lectins in Veterinary Species: Recent Advancements and Applications
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(14), 5122; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21145122 - 20 Jul 2020
Abstract
C-type lectins (CTLs), a superfamily of glycan-binding receptors, play a pivotal role in the host defense against pathogens and the maintenance of immune homeostasis of higher animals and humans. CTLs in innate immunity serve as pattern recognition receptors and often bind to glycan [...] Read more.
C-type lectins (CTLs), a superfamily of glycan-binding receptors, play a pivotal role in the host defense against pathogens and the maintenance of immune homeostasis of higher animals and humans. CTLs in innate immunity serve as pattern recognition receptors and often bind to glycan structures in damage- and pathogen-associated molecular patterns. While CTLs are found throughout the whole animal kingdom, their ligand specificities and downstream signaling have mainly been studied in humans and in model organisms such as mice. In this review, recent advancements in CTL research in veterinary species as well as potential applications of CTL targeting in veterinary medicine are outlined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Glycosylation-Based Biomarkers in Diseases and Drug Delivery)
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