ijms-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Neuroscience"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Neurobiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Coco Silvia
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Medicine and Surgery, University of Milano-Bicocca, Via Cadore, 48 20900 Monza, Italy & NeuroMI-Milan Center for Neuroscience Italy
Interests: Mesenchymal stem cells; extracellular vesicles; microvesicles; exosomes, Alzheimer’s disease; microglial cells; inflammation
Dr. Malosio Maria Luisa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Neuroscience, CNR (Italian National Research Council), Via Vanvitelli 32, 2019 Milano (IT) & Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 113 - 20089 Rozzano, Milan, Italy
Interests: Neuroimmunological disorders; mesenchymal stem cells; extracellular vesicles; Alzheimer's disease; diabetes; stroke; inflammation; aptamers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Multipotent Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) have recently become very popular in cell therapy applications due to their multifaceted properties. Initially exploited for non-neurological pathologies, they are now also being applied in neurosciences. It has emerged, in fact, that most neurological conditions would benefit from a treatment able to provide tissue repair (neuro-protection and neuro-restoration) and immunomodulatory effects (immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory actions) delivered exactly at the site where it is needed. Therefore, new strategies are being studied to target inflammation and possibly to promote the intrinsic regeneration potential. Along these directions, MSC are emerging as an extremely attractive tool due to their ability to release a proactive secretome composed of soluble factors and/or extracellular vesicles. MSC offer practical advantages for clinical applications because they can be isolated from adults with minimally invasive procedures. Applications of MSC or their by-products are now studied for the treatment of many neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions for which there is no ideal cure to date.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to provide an overview of the current status of MSC application in neurological conditions and to delineate the current foundations for possible future applications in this field.

Dr. Coco Silvia
Dr. Malosio Maria Luisa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mesenchymal stem cells
  • extracellular vesicles
  • microvesicles
  • exosomes, neurodegenerative diseases
  • neurological conditions
  • inflammation
  • cell therapy

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Intrathecal Injection in a Rat Model: A Potential Route to Deliver Human Wharton’s Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Brain
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(4), 1272; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21041272 - 13 Feb 2020
Abstract
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as promising therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders because they can reduce underlying pathology and also repair damaged tissues. Regarding the delivery of MSCs into the brain, intravenous and intra-arterial routes may be less feasible than intraparenchymal and [...] Read more.
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as promising therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative disorders because they can reduce underlying pathology and also repair damaged tissues. Regarding the delivery of MSCs into the brain, intravenous and intra-arterial routes may be less feasible than intraparenchymal and intracerebroventricular routes due to the blood–brain barrier. Compared to the intraparenchymal or intracerebroventricular routes, however, the intrathecal route may have advantages: this route can deliver MSCs throughout the entire neuraxis and it is less invasive since brain surgery is not required. The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution of human Wharton’s jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs) injected via the intrathecal route in a rat model. WJ-MSCs (1 × 106) were intrathecally injected via the L2-3 intervertebral space in 6-week-old Sprague Dawley rats. These rats were then sacrificed at varying time points: 0, 6, and 12 h following injection. At 12 h, a significant number of MSCs were detected in the brain but not in other organs. Furthermore, with a 10-fold higher dose of WJ-MSCs, there was a substantial increase in the number of cells migrating to the brain. These results suggest that the intrathecal route can be a promising route for the performance of stem cell therapy for CNS diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Neuroscience)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop