Special Issue "Application of GIS for Biodiversity Research"

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Neftali Sillero
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Spatial Biology Lab. CICGE - Research Center for Geo-Space Science, University of Porto, Porto, 4099-002, Portugal
Interests: spatial distribution patterns; spatial ecology; biogeography; conservation biology; GIS; remote sensing; ecological niche models; spatial statistics
Dr. Salvador Arenas-Castro
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Spatial Biology Lab. CICGE - Research Center for Geo-Space Science, University of Porto, Porto, 4099-002, Portugal
Interests: biogeography; conservation biology; dendroecology; ecology; GIS; image processing; remote sensing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Geographical information systems (GIS) are indispensable tools of spatial analysis. In particular, the study of biodiversity has a strong spatial component. We propose here a Special Volume of ISPRSInternational Journal of Geo-Information on Application of GIS for Biodiversity Research. GIS, together with spatial statistics, are essential for analysing spatial patterns of biodiversity, from genes to individuals, species and communities. GIS are the best tool to collect, store, manage and map distribution data, basal to any type of spatial analyses. Thus, distribution atlases are now completely performed with GIS, namely by web GIS applications. With atlas data, we can determine species chorotypes and biogeographical areas. Ecological niche modelling (ENMs) is probably the most used analytical spatial tool to analyse the factors driving the species ranges. With ENMs, we can model species richness, range shifts and species dispersions, species invasions, hybrid zones, and help to analyse the phylogeography and systematics of species. GIS have made it possible to analyse landscape connectivity, the spatial structure of communities, and species home ranges. However, GIS are also essential in conserving biodiversity: GIS algorithms are able to find the most efficient network of protected areas. GIS can analyse and model factors threatening biodiversity, such as habitat loss by urbanisation and road-kills. We invite all researchers to submit their works applying GIS in Biodiversity research.

Dr. Neftali Sillero
Dr. Salvador Arenas-Castro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • GIS
  • spatial statistics
  • ecological niche models
  • remote sensing
  • biogeography
  • phylogeography
  • spatial ecology
  • conservation
  • protected areas
  • species distributions

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Urban Ecological Corridor Network Construction: An Integration of the Least Cost Path Model and the InVEST Model
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(1), 33; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9010033 - 06 Jan 2020
Abstract
Under the background of urban expansion, ecological protection cannot be delayed. The construction of ecological networks is of considerable significance to ecosystem services. However, in the process of constructing a corridor network, there is no uniform standard for the selection of ecological sources [...] Read more.
Under the background of urban expansion, ecological protection cannot be delayed. The construction of ecological networks is of considerable significance to ecosystem services. However, in the process of constructing a corridor network, there is no uniform standard for the selection of ecological sources and the determination of cost factors. The InVEST model is an effective complement to ecosystem service assessment for sensitively measuring external threats and their threat intensity. Therefore, taking Wuhan as an example, we combined InVEST and the least cost path model (LCP) to construct a multi-target corridor network with comprehensive cost factors for birds and small terrestrial mammals. The results showed that: 1) The InVEST model provided a reliable basis for ecological source screening by demonstrating the distribution of habitat quality. 2)  The corridor with a length of 12–25 km presented a “U” shape, and the impact of urbanization on small terrestrial mammals was more significant than that of birds. 3) The integrated network pattern proposed by the "point-line-plane" principle would provide a reference for urban ecological construction and sustainable development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of GIS for Biodiversity Research)
Open AccessArticle
An Improved Mobile Mapping System to Detect Road-Killed Amphibians and Small Birds
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2019, 8(12), 565; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi8120565 - 10 Dec 2019
Abstract
Roads represent a major source of mortality for many species. To mitigate road mortality, it is essential to know where collisions with vehicles are happening and which species and populations are most affected. For this, moving platforms such as mobile mapping systems (MMS) [...] Read more.
Roads represent a major source of mortality for many species. To mitigate road mortality, it is essential to know where collisions with vehicles are happening and which species and populations are most affected. For this, moving platforms such as mobile mapping systems (MMS) can be used to automatically detect road-killed animals on the road surface. We recently developed an MMS to detect road-killed amphibians, composed of a scanning system on a trailer. We present here a smaller and improved version of this system (MMS2) for detecting road-killed amphibians and small birds. It is composed of a stereo multi-spectral and high definition camera (ZED), a high-power processing laptop, a global positioning system (GPS) device, a support device, and a lighter charger. The MMS2 can be easily attached to any vehicle and the surveys can be performed by any person with or without sampling skills. To evaluate the system’s effectiveness, we performed several controlled and real surveys in the Évora district (Portugal). In real surveys, the system detected approximately 78% of the amphibians and birds present on surveyed roads (overlooking 22%) and generated approximately 17% of false positives. Our system can improve the implementation of conservation measures, saving time for researchers and transportation planning professionals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Application of GIS for Biodiversity Research)
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