Special Issue "Well-being, Mental Health and Prevention of Psychosocial Risks in Contemporary Working Life"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Sergio Iavicoli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Hygiene, INAIL—Italian Workers’ Compensation Authority, Monte Porzio Catone, Rome 00078, Italy
Prof. Dr. Stavroula Leka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Management and Marketing, Cork University Business School, University College Cork, Cork T12 K8AF, Ireland
2. Centre for Organizational Health and Development, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, NG8 1BB, Nottingham, UK
Prof. Dr. Jian Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Occupational, Social and Environmental Medicine, Centre for Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Düsseldorf, Universitätsstrasse 1, Düsseldorf 40225, Germany
2. Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health; School of Nursing, University of California Los Angeles, 650 Charles E. Young Drive South, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce the Special Issue on ‘’Well-being, Mental Health, and the Prevention of Psychosocial Risks in Contemporary Working Life’’, which we are editing in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Mentally healthy workplaces are crucial for sustaining workers’ well-being and preventing mental illness. EU- OSHA’s cost estimate of mental diseases was €240 billion a year in 2014, and 57% of these diseases were linked to a loss of productivity including sick leave (EU-OSHA, 2014). According to the World Health Organization’s definition of positive mental health, mentally healthy individuals “can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and … will perform better in their work.” To remain competitive, organizations need to invest in creating mentally healthy workplaces where a positive organizational environment and social context are being promoted and work design and work organization are well-managed to avoid their detrimental effect on workers’ health and safety and employee well-being.

Researchers and practitioners can support organizations providing up-to-date methods, tools, and practical solutions at organizational and policy levels in the field of occupational health and safety to effectively manage psychosocial risks at work and prevent their potential negative impact on workers’ health, well-being, and organizational sustainability.  

The purpose of this Special Issue is to publish original, high-quality research papers as well as review articles addressing recent advances in occupational health psychology with a special focus on psychosocial risk prevention in the workplace and the promotion of workers’ mental health and well-being. We particularly welcome multidisciplinary contributions, papers on policy impact, studies with strong implications for practice, and papers reporting occupational health interventions and their outcomes and/or process evaluations.

All submitted manuscripts will be processed through a peer review process.

We look forward to hearing from you soon.

Prof. Dr. Sergio Iavicoli
Prof. Dr. Stavroula Leka
Dr. Jian Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mental health
  • Psychosocial risks
  • Well-being at work
  • Mentally healthy workplaces
  • Work-related stress
  • Job content and work organization
  • Working conditions
  • Social and interpersonal context at work
  • Individual and organizational factors and their interactions
  • Positive individual resources and coping strategies
  • Bullying and harassment at work
  • Intervention evaluation process
  • Mental health policies
  • Workers’ well-being promotion
  • Cost of stress at work.

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
The Role of Leisure-Time Physical Activity in the Change of Work-Related Stress (ERI) over Time
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4839; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234839 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
Background: Every second employee in Europe complains about work-related stress. Occupational stress due to an imbalance between efforts spent and rewards gained (effort-reward imbalance = ERI) is well investigated and it is associated with mental and physical health. A common guess is that [...] Read more.
Background: Every second employee in Europe complains about work-related stress. Occupational stress due to an imbalance between efforts spent and rewards gained (effort-reward imbalance = ERI) is well investigated and it is associated with mental and physical health. A common guess is that leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) has beneficial effects on work-related stress. Yet, evidence in support of this assumption is weak, especially regarding ERI-stress. Longitudinal studies investigating the role of LTPA on ERI are missing. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the effect of LTPA on work-related stress by ERI over time. Methods: 3961 socially insured employees that were born in 1959 or 1965 and working in the first (t1: 2011) and second wave (t2: 2014) of the lidA-study were included. Work-related stress was measured by ERI, LTPA by the self-rated weekly frequency of physical activities. Besides the direct effect, a moderating effect of LTPA on ERI over time was tested in the multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The ERI at t1 was strongly associated with ERI at t2. While LTPA had no direct effect on ERI(t2), it was a significant moderator of ERI from t1 to t2: The higher the frequency of LTPA, the lower ERI was over time. This interaction of LTPA with ERI remained after adjustment for socio-demographic factors. Conclusions: The long-term moderating effect of LTPA on ERI is in agreement with former investigations on the role of LTPA on work-related stress, generally, and on its cross-sectional effect on ERI-stress, specifically. Some of Hill’s criteria of a causal association in epidemiology (biological gradient, temporality, consistency) support our findings. As LTPA has also been shown to exert a protective effect on health outcomes that are associated with ERI, the moderation of ERI by LTPA could partly explain this protective effect. Future observational and interventional studies are required to support our results over more than two age groups and study times. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Psychosocial Risks and Violence Against Teachers. Is It Possible to Promote Well-Being at Work?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4439; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224439 - 12 Nov 2019
Abstract
Teaching has been reported to be one of the most stressful occupations, with heavy psychological demands, including the need to develop positive relationships with students and their parents; relationships that, in turn, play a significant role in teachers’ well-being. It follows that the [...] Read more.
Teaching has been reported to be one of the most stressful occupations, with heavy psychological demands, including the need to develop positive relationships with students and their parents; relationships that, in turn, play a significant role in teachers’ well-being. It follows that the impact of any violence perpetrated by a student or parent against a teacher is particularly significant and represents a major occupational health concern. The present study examines for the first time the influence of the Job Demands-Control-Support Model on violence directed against teachers. Six hundred and eighty-six teachers working in elementary and high schools in north-east Italy completed an online, self-report questionnaire. Our findings reveal the role played by working conditions in determining teachers’ experience of violence: greater job demands are associated with most offense types, whereas the availability of diffused social support at school is associated with lower rates of harassment. Workload should be equally distributed and kept under control, and violence should gain its place in the shared daily monitoring of practices and experiences at school in order to provide a socially supportive work environment for all teachers. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Risk Factors for Workplace Bullying: A Systematic Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(11), 1945; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16111945 - 31 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Objective: The goal of this study was to systematically review risk factors for workplace bullying. Methods: The search was carried out in two databases. Studies with estimates of risk factors for workplace bullying were included in the review. We assessed the [...] Read more.
Objective: The goal of this study was to systematically review risk factors for workplace bullying. Methods: The search was carried out in two databases. Studies with estimates of risk factors for workplace bullying were included in the review. We assessed the quality of the selected studies using an adapted version of the Downs and Black checklist. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) and Meta-analyses of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines were used for reporting papers. Results: Fifty-one papers were included, and 70.6% were from European countries. Women were reported to be at higher risk of being bullied in most studies (odds ratio (OR) from 1.17 to 2.77). Authoritarian and laissez-faire leadership styles were positively associated with bullying. Several psychosocial factors, such as stress (OR from 1.37 to 4.96), and occupational risks related to work organization, such as flexible work methods, role conflict, role ambiguity, monotonous or rotating tasks, high demands, pressure of work, and unclarity of duties were strongly associated with bullying. Discussion: The findings highlight the central role of organizational factors in bullying. Policies to prevent bullying must address the culture of organizations, facing the challenge of developing a new management and leadership framework. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Workplace-Based Organizational Interventions Promoting Mental Health and Happiness among Healthcare Workers: A Realist Review
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4396; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224396 - 11 Nov 2019
Abstract
Mental illness, deemed globally to account for 32% of years lived with a disability, generates significant impacts on workplaces. In particular, healthcare workers experience high rates of mental ill health such as burnout, stress, and depression due to workplace conditions including excessive workloads, [...] Read more.
Mental illness, deemed globally to account for 32% of years lived with a disability, generates significant impacts on workplaces. In particular, healthcare workers experience high rates of mental ill health such as burnout, stress, and depression due to workplace conditions including excessive workloads, workplace violence and bullying, which also produces negative effects on patients as well as on the happiness and wellbeing of those who remain at work. This review was undertaken to synthesize the evidence on workplace-based interventions at the organizational level promoting mental health and wellbeing among healthcare workers, to identify what has been receiving attention in this area and why, especially considering how such positive effects are produced. A search of three premier health-related databases identified 1290 articles that discussed healthcare workers, workplace interventions, and mental health. Following further examination, 46 articles were ultimately selected as meeting the criteria specifying interventions at the organizational level and combined with similar studies included in a relevant Cochrane review. The 60 chosen articles were then analyzed following a realist framework analyzing context, mechanism, and outcome. Most of the studies included in the realist review were conducted in high-income countries, and the types of organizational-level interventions studied included skills and knowledge development, leadership development, communication and team building, stress management as well as workload and time management. Common themes from the realist review highlight the importance of employee engagement in the intervention development and implementation process. The literature review also supports the recognized need for more research on mental health and happiness in low- and middle-income countries, and for studies evaluating the longer-term effects of workplace mental health promotion. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop