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Special Issue "Sleep Health"

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Girardin Jean-Louis

Department of Population Health, NYU School of Medicine, NY, NY 01610,USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sleep, circadian rhythm, cardiovascular disease, brain health, sleep apnea, health disparity
Guest Editor
Dr. Azizi Seixas

Department of Population Health and the Center for Healthful Behavior Change, NYU School of Medicine, NY, NY 01610, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: sleep health, cardiovascular disease, behavioral medicine, health disparity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on “Sleep Health” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH). IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes research articles examining the intersection of environment and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

 The Special Issue’s focus on sleep health comes at a time when insufficient sleep, poor sleep, and sleep disorders have become a global epidemic across contexts and among different groups. The perfunctory and essential questions this special issue will seek to address include:

  1. What conditions might be driving the global increase in sleep problems?

  2. What are the health consequences of poor sleep health?

  3. What are the solutions to curb or remedy the burden of sleep problems and sleep-related health problems?

The current Special Issue, entitled “Sleep Health” will provide a venue to discuss these three fundamental questions.

This Special Issue is open to original research, review articles, short reports, brief commentary, case reports, meta-analyses, simulation studies, and epidemiologic models related to sleep health. The keywords listed below suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

We invite you to submit articles in the following areas:

  • Medications and Other Substances (alcohol, smoking, caffeine)

  • Psychological and Medical Conditions

  • Jet Lag and Shift Work

  • Environmental effects on sleep (temperature, noise, light, bedroom, electronic use,         neighborhood characteristics)

  • Disparities in Sleep Health and sleep-related health conditions

  • Consequences of poor sleep health

Prof. Girardin Jean-Louis
Dr. Azizi Seixas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Sleep

  • Health

  • Environment

Published Papers (15 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Sleep Quality and Its Associated Factors among Low-Income Adults in a Rural Area of China: A Population-Based Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 2055; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092055
Received: 8 July 2018 / Revised: 14 September 2018 / Accepted: 14 September 2018 / Published: 19 September 2018
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Abstract
Background: There is limited population-based research focusing on sleep quality among low-income Chinese adults in rural areas. This study aimed to assess sleep quality among low-income adults in a rural area in China and identify the association between sleep quality and sociodemographic, lifestyle
[...] Read more.
Background: There is limited population-based research focusing on sleep quality among low-income Chinese adults in rural areas. This study aimed to assess sleep quality among low-income adults in a rural area in China and identify the association between sleep quality and sociodemographic, lifestyle and health-related factors. Methods: The study was conducted from September to November in 2017 using a cross-sectional survey questionnaire. A total of 6905 participants were recruited via multistage, stratified cluster sampling. Data were collected using the Chinese versions of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Food Frequency Questionnaire, while we also determined the sociodemographic profiles of the participants. Results: The mean age of the sample was 58.71 ± 14.50 years, with 59.7% being male, while the mean duration of daily sleep was 5.95 ± 1.31 h, with 56.7% reportedly experiencing poor sleep quality. Multiple regression analysis revealed that older age, unemployment, lower income, disability and chronic disease comorbidities were significant factors associated with an increased risk of poor sleep quality for both genders. Moreover, married and higher education level were associated with decreased risk of poor sleep quality for females, while a meat-heavy diet and illness during the past two weeks increased the risk of poor sleep quality for males. Conclusions: Sociodemographic, lifestyle and health-related factors had an impact on the frequently poor sleep quality of low-income Chinese adults in rural areas. Thus, comprehensive measures must be developed to address the modifiable predictive factors that can possibly enhance sleep quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle Is Sleep Duration Associated with Biological Age (BA)?: Analysis of (2010–2015) South Korean NHANES Dataset South Korea
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(9), 2009; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15092009
Received: 6 August 2018 / Revised: 7 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 September 2018 / Published: 14 September 2018
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Abstract
(1) Background: South Korea ranked worst in sleep duration compared to other countries, but there are no clear healthcare programs to guarantee sufficient sleep. Studies are needed to suggest evidence and arouse public awareness of the negative effects of abnormal sleep duration. In
[...] Read more.
(1) Background: South Korea ranked worst in sleep duration compared to other countries, but there are no clear healthcare programs to guarantee sufficient sleep. Studies are needed to suggest evidence and arouse public awareness of the negative effects of abnormal sleep duration. In this study, we investigated the relationship between biological age (BA) and sleep duration. (2) Methods: We used data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (KNHANES V-VI; 2010–2015, which is an annually cross-sectional study including 29,309 participants). We performed multiple linear regression to investigate the associations between sleep duration and differences in BA and chronological age (CA). (3) Results: A total of 14.22% of respondents had short sleep duration (less than 6 h per day) and 7.10% of respondents had long sleep duration (more than 8 h per day). People with long sleep duration had a positive correlation with difference between BA and CA (>8 h per day, β = 1.308, p-value = 0.0001; ref = 6~8 h per day, normal). Short sleep duration had an inverse trend with the difference, although the result was not statically significant. Associations were greater in vulnerable populations, such as low income, obese, or people with chronic diseases. (4) Conclusions: Excess sleep duration that is greater than the normal range was associated with increased BA. In particular, such relationships that are related to worsening BA were greater in patients with low income, obesity, and chronic diseases. Based on our findings, healthcare professionals should also consider the negative effects of excess sleep, not only insufficient sleep. Alternatives for controlling optimal sleep duration should be reviewed, especially with vulnerable populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle Relationship between Sleep Disorders and Health Related Quality of Life—Results from the Georgia SOMNUS Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1588; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081588
Received: 8 June 2018 / Revised: 10 July 2018 / Accepted: 23 July 2018 / Published: 26 July 2018
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Abstract
The extent to which sleep disorders are associated with impairment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is poorly described in the developing world. We investigated the prevalence and severity of various sleep disorders and their associations with HRQoL in an urban Georgian population.
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The extent to which sleep disorders are associated with impairment of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is poorly described in the developing world. We investigated the prevalence and severity of various sleep disorders and their associations with HRQoL in an urban Georgian population. 395 volunteers (20–60 years) completed Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, STOP-Bang questionnaire, Insomnia Severity Index, Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form, and Short Form Health Survey (SF-12). Socio-demographic data and body mass index (BMI) were obtained. The prevalence of sleep disorders and their association with HRQoL was considerable. All SF-12 components and physical and mental component summaries (PCS, MCS) were significantly lower in poor sleepers, subjects with daytime sleepiness, apnea risk, or insomnia. Insomnia and apnea severity were also associated with lower scores on most SF-12 dimensions. The effect of insomnia severity was more pronounced on MCS, while apnea severity—on PCS. Hierarchical analyses showed that after controlling for potential confounding factors (demographics, depression, BMI), sleep quality significantly increased model’s predictive power with an R2 change (ΔR2) by 3.5% for PCS (adjusted R2 = 0.27) and by 2.9% for MCS (adjusted R2 = 0.48); for the other SF-12 components ΔR2 ranged between 1.4% and 4.6%. ESS, STOP-Bang, ISI scores, all exerted clear effects on PCS and MCS in an individual regression models. Our results confirm and extend the findings of studies from Western societies and strongly support the importance of sleep for HRQoL. Elaboration of intervention programs designed to strengthen sleep-related health care and thereof HRQoL is especially important in the developing world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle Self-Reported Sleep Duration and Its Correlates with Sociodemographics, Health Behaviours, Poor Mental Health, and Chronic Conditions in Rural Persons 40 Years and Older in South Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1357; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071357
Received: 30 May 2018 / Revised: 26 June 2018 / Accepted: 27 June 2018 / Published: 28 June 2018
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Abstract
This study aims to investigate sleep duration and its association with sociodemographic, health behaviour, mental health, and chronic disease factors among rural individuals 40 years and older in South Africa. Cross-sectional data from the “Health and Aging in Africa: A Longitudinal Study of
[...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate sleep duration and its association with sociodemographic, health behaviour, mental health, and chronic disease factors among rural individuals 40 years and older in South Africa. Cross-sectional data from the “Health and Aging in Africa: A Longitudinal Study of an INDEPTH community in South Africa” (HAALSI) baseline survey were analysed. Socio-demographic, clinical, health, and sleep duration data were collected. The total sample included 4725 persons 40 years and older (mean age 61.5 years, SD = 13.0, age range of 40–111 years) in one sub-district in rural South Africa. The mean sleep duration was 8.28 ± 1.93 h. Short (<7 h) and long (≥9 h) sleepers accounted for 13.1% and 40.0% of the sample, respectively. In adjusted multinomial logistic regression, greater wealth status (p < 0.05), inadequate fruit and vegetable consumption (p < 0.001), and depressive symptoms (p < 0.05) were associated with a higher odds and physical inactivity (p < 0.05) with a lower odds of short sleep duration. Being male (p < 0.001) and depressive symptoms (p < 0.001) were associated with a higher odds and being 50 to 69 years old (p < 0.01), having Grade 1 to 11 education (p < 0.05), and greater wealth status (p < 0.001) were associated with a lower odds of long sleep duration. In adjusted multinomial logistic regression, compared to normal sleepers, long sleepers were more likely to have myocardial infarction (p < 0.05). In unadjusted analysis, compared to normal sleepers, short sleepers were more likely to have cataracts (p < 0.05). This study found that a significant proportion of rural dwellers 40 years and older in South Africa had a short sleep duration and a high proportion had a long sleep duration. Some associations, such as depression and myocardial infarction, with short and/or long sleep duration were confirmed, while no associations were found for many chronic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
Open AccessArticle Comparison of Wearable Trackers’ Ability to Estimate Sleep
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1265; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061265
Received: 15 April 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 11 June 2018 / Published: 15 June 2018
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Abstract
Tracking physical activity and sleep patterns using wearable trackers has become a current trend. However, little information exists about the comparability of wearable trackers measuring sleep. This study examined the comparability of wearable trackers for estimating sleep measurement with a sleep diary (SD)
[...] Read more.
Tracking physical activity and sleep patterns using wearable trackers has become a current trend. However, little information exists about the comparability of wearable trackers measuring sleep. This study examined the comparability of wearable trackers for estimating sleep measurement with a sleep diary (SD) for three full nights. A convenience sample of 78 adults were recruited in this research with a mean age of 27.6 ± 11.0 years. Comparisons between wearable trackers and sleep outcomes were analyzed using the mean absolute percentage errors, Pearson correlations, Bland–Altman Plots, and equivalent testing. Trackers that showed the greatest equivalence with the SD for total sleep time were the Jawbone UP3 and Fitbit Charge Heart Rate (effect size = 0.09 and 0.23, respectively). The greatest equivalence with the SD for time in bed was seen with the SenseWear Armband, Garmin Vivosmart, and Jawbone UP3 (effect size = 0.09, 0.16, and 0.07, respectively). Some of the wearable trackers resulted in closer approximations to self-reported sleep outcomes than a previously sleep research-grade device, these trackers offer a lower-cost alternative to tracking sleep in healthy populations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle Relationship between Job Stress and 5-HT2A Receptor Polymorphisms on Self-Reported Sleep Quality in Physicians in Urumqi (Xinjiang, China): A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 1034; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15051034
Received: 22 March 2018 / Revised: 15 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 21 May 2018
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Abstract
The serotonin receptor (5-HTR) plays a key role in sleep quality regulation. Job-related stress is an important factor that influences sleep quality. However, few reports on the interaction between 5-HTR2A polymorphisms and job stress, and how they may impact upon sleep quality are
[...] Read more.
The serotonin receptor (5-HTR) plays a key role in sleep quality regulation. Job-related stress is an important factor that influences sleep quality. However, few reports on the interaction between 5-HTR2A polymorphisms and job stress, and how they may impact upon sleep quality are available. Therefore this study investigated the effects of job stress, 5-HTR2A polymorphisms, and their interaction on sleep quality, in physicians. Using a two-stage stratified sampling method, 918 participants were initially invited to participate in the study. After screening for study inclusion and exclusion criteria, 504 subjects were eventually included in the study. Job stress and sleep quality were assessed using the Job Stress Survey (JSS) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), respectively. The 5-HTR2A receptor gene polymorphisms T102C and -1438G/A of were determined using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Job stress was significantly associated with sleep quality. High levels of job stress were linked to a higher risk of poor sleep quality compared to low or moderate levels [odds ratio (OR) = 2.909, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.697–4.986]. High levels of stress may reduce subjects’ sleep quality, leading to an increase the likelihood of sleep disturbances and subsequent daytime dysfunction. The 5-HTR2A receptor gene polymorphism T102C was not significantly associated with sleep quality in this study, however, the -1438G/A polymorphism was significantly associated with sleep quality. The GG genotype of the -1438G/A polymorphism was linked to poorer sleep quality. When compared with subjects with low job-related stress levels×AG/AA genotype (OR = 2.106, 95% CI: 1.278–3.471), physicians with high job-related stress levels×GG genotype had a higher risk of experiencing poor sleep quality (OR = 13.400, 95% CI: 3.143–57.137). The findings of our study indicate that job stress and 5-HTR2A receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with sleep quality in physicians. Subjects with high job stress level or/and the -1438G/A GG genotype were more likely to report poor sleep quality, and furthermore, their combination effect on sleep quality was higher than their independent effects, so it may be suggested that job-related stress and genes have a cumulative effect on sleep quality; that is, stress can increase the risk of poor sleep quality, but this effect is worse in a group of people with specific gene polymorphisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle The Associations between Sleep Duration and Sleep Quality with Body-Mass Index in a Large Sample of Young Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 758; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040758
Received: 26 February 2018 / Revised: 2 April 2018 / Accepted: 11 April 2018 / Published: 15 April 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: The main aims of this study were to explore the associations between time spent in bed (as a proxy of sleep duration) and sleep quality with overweight/obesity status in a large sample of young adults. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, participants were
[...] Read more.
Background: The main aims of this study were to explore the associations between time spent in bed (as a proxy of sleep duration) and sleep quality with overweight/obesity status in a large sample of young adults. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, participants were 2100 university students (49.6% of women). We used Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire to assess time spent in bed and sleep quality. Body-mass index (BMI) was self-reported and dichotomized as normal (<25 kg/m2) vs. overweight/obesity (≥25 kg/m2) status. Results: In model 1, both short (<6 h/day, OR = 2.72; 95% CI 1.27 to 5.84) and long (>10 h/day, OR = 3.38; 95% CI 2.12 to 5.40) time spent in bed were associated with a greater likelihood of being overweight/obese. In model 2, poor sleep quality (>5 points, OR = 1.45; 95% CI 1.14 to 1.83) was associated with a greater likelihood of being overweight/obese. After entering time spent in bed and sleep quality simultaneously into the model 3, both short (OR = 2.64; 95% CI 1.23 to 5.66) and long (OR = 3.27; 95% CI 2.04 to 5.23) time spent in bed and poor sleep quality (OR = 1.40; 95% CI 1.10 to 1.78) were associated with overweight/obesity status. Conclusions: Our results show that both short and long time spent in bed and poor sleep quality are associated with overweight/obesity status in young adults. Special interventions and policies that use both sleep duration and sleep quality as protective factors against overweight/obesity are warranted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
Open AccessArticle Black–White Differences in Housing Type and Sleep Duration as Well as Sleep Difficulties in the United States
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 564; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040564
Received: 11 December 2017 / Revised: 10 March 2018 / Accepted: 16 March 2018 / Published: 21 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (354 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Housing environments can directly and indirectly affect sleep, and blacks are more likely than whites to live in suboptimal housing conditions, which may independently contribute to sleep disparities. However, few large-scale epidemiological studies consider the potential influence of housing type on sleep health.
[...] Read more.
Housing environments can directly and indirectly affect sleep, and blacks are more likely than whites to live in suboptimal housing conditions, which may independently contribute to sleep disparities. However, few large-scale epidemiological studies consider the potential influence of housing type on sleep health. Using data from the 2004–2015 National Health Interview Survey, we investigated overall and Black-White differences in the association between housing type (house/apartment versus mobile home/trailer) and sleep duration as well as sleep difficulties among 226,208 adults in the U.S. Poisson regression with robust variance was used to estimate sex-specific prevalence ratios (PR) for sleep categories, first comparing houses/apartments to mobile homes/trailers and then blacks to whites within housing types. All models were adjusted for age, educational attainment, income, occupational class, self-reported general health status, and region of residence. Compared to participants living in houses/apartments, the prevalence of short sleep was higher for men (PR = 1.05 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02–1.08)) and women (PR = 1.07 (95% CI: 1.04–1.09)) in mobile homes/trailers. Black men (PR = 1.26 (95% CI: 1.21–1.30)) and women (PR = 1.24 (95% CI: 1.20–1.27)) in a house/apartment were more likely to be short sleepers than their white counterparts. There was generally no significant difference in sleep characteristics (except long sleep) between black and white men in mobile homes/trailers after adjustments, and black men in houses/apartments as well as black women in both housing types were less likely to report sleep difficulties although being more likely to report short sleep. Overall, individuals in mobile homes/trailers, which may represent suboptimal housing, had worse sleep than those in houses/apartments; and racial differences in the quality of houses and apartments are likely to greatly vary in ways that still contribute to sleep disparities. Race–sex group differences in sleep duration among residents in a house/apartment and even a lack of racial difference among individuals living in mobile homes/trailers support the need for more research on residential environments and eventually multi-level interventions designed to reduce sleep disparities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
Open AccessArticle The Relationship between Alcohol Drinking Patterns and Sleep Duration among Black and White Men and Women in the United States
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 557; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030557
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 21 February 2018 / Accepted: 2 March 2018 / Published: 20 March 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (1619 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In the United States, racial minorities generally experience poorer cardiovascular health compared to whites, and differences in alcohol consumption and sleep could contribute to these disparities. With a nationally representative sample of 187,950 adults in the National Health Interview Survey from 2004 to
[...] Read more.
In the United States, racial minorities generally experience poorer cardiovascular health compared to whites, and differences in alcohol consumption and sleep could contribute to these disparities. With a nationally representative sample of 187,950 adults in the National Health Interview Survey from 2004 to 2015, we examined the relationship between alcohol-drinking patterns and sleep duration/quality by race and sex. Using Poisson regression models with robust variance, we estimated sex-specific prevalence ratios for each sleep duration/quality category among blacks compared to whites within categories of alcohol-drinking pattern, adjusting for socioeconomic status and other potential confounders. Across alcohol drinking patterns, blacks were less likely than whites to report recommended sleep of 7–<9 h/day. Short (PR = 1.30 [95% CI: 1.22–1.39]) and long (PR = 1.30 [95% CI: 1.07–1.58]) sleep were 30% more prevalent among black-male infrequent heavy drinkers compared to white-male infrequent heavy drinkers. Short (PR = 1.27 [95% CI: 1.21–1.34]) sleep was more prevalent among black-female infrequent heavy drinkers compared to white-female infrequent heavy drinkers, but there was no difference for long sleep (PR = 1.09 [95% CI: 0.97–1.23]). Black female infrequent moderate drinkers, however, had a 16% higher (PR = 1.16 [95% CI: 1.01–1.33]) prevalence of long sleep compared to their white counterparts. Environmental, social, and biological factors contributing to these findings, along with their impact on disparate health outcomes, should be studied in greater detail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle The Acute Effects of Intermittent Light Exposure in the Evening on Alertness and Subsequent Sleep Architecture
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 524; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030524
Received: 22 January 2018 / Revised: 28 February 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 15 March 2018
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Abstract
Exposure to bright light is typically intermittent in our daily life. However, the acute effects of intermittent light on alertness and sleep have seldom been explored. To investigate this issue, we employed within-subject design and compared the effects of three light conditions: intermittent
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Exposure to bright light is typically intermittent in our daily life. However, the acute effects of intermittent light on alertness and sleep have seldom been explored. To investigate this issue, we employed within-subject design and compared the effects of three light conditions: intermittent bright light (30-min pulse of blue-enriched bright light (~1000 lux, ~6000 K) alternating with 30-min dim normal light (~5 lux, ~3600 K) three times); continuous bright light; and continuous dim light on subjective and objective alertness and subsequent sleep structure. Each light exposure was conducted during the three hours before bedtime. Fifteen healthy volunteers (20 ± 3.4 years; seven males) were scheduled to stay in the sleep laboratory for four separated nights (one for adaptation and the others for the light exposures) with a period of at least one week between nights. The results showed that when compared with dim light, both intermittent light and continuous bright light significantly increased subjective alertness and decreased sleep efficiency (SE) and total sleep time (TST). Intermittent light significantly increased objective alertness than dim light did during the second half of the light-exposure period. Our results suggested that intermittent light was as effective as continuous bright light in their acute effects in enhancing subjective and objective alertness and in negatively impacting subsequent sleep. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle The Cost of Inadequate Sleep among On-Call Workers in Australia: A Workplace Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 398; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030398
Received: 27 December 2017 / Revised: 7 February 2018 / Accepted: 14 February 2018 / Published: 26 February 2018
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Abstract
On-call or stand-by is becoming an increasingly prevalent form of work scheduling. However, on-call arrangements are typically utilised when workloads are low, for example at night, which can result in inadequate sleep. It is a matter of concern that on-call work is associated
[...] Read more.
On-call or stand-by is becoming an increasingly prevalent form of work scheduling. However, on-call arrangements are typically utilised when workloads are low, for example at night, which can result in inadequate sleep. It is a matter of concern that on-call work is associated with an increased risk of workplace injury. This study sought to determine the economic cost of injury due to inadequate sleep in Australian on-call workers. The prevalence of inadequate sleep among on-call workers was determined using an online survey, and economic costs were estimated using a previously validated costing methodology. Two-thirds of the sample (66%) reported obtaining inadequate sleep on weekdays (work days) and over 80% reported inadequate sleep while on-call. The resulting cost of injury is estimated at $2.25 billion per year ($1.71–2.73 billion). This equates to $1222 per person per incident involving a short-term absence from work; $2.53 million per incident classified as full incapacity, and $1.78 million for each fatality. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study to quantify the economic cost of workplace injury due to inadequate sleep in on-call workers. Well-rested employees are critical to safe and productive workplace operations. Therefore, it is in the interest of both employers and governments to prioritise and invest far more into the management of inadequate sleep in industries which utilise on-call work arrangements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
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Open AccessArticle Sleep Duration and Quality in Pregnant Women: A Cross-Sectional Survey in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 817; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070817
Received: 17 May 2017 / Revised: 14 July 2017 / Accepted: 18 July 2017 / Published: 20 July 2017
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (331 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Objectives: Good maternal health and fetal development require sufficient and good quality of sleep during pregnancy. This study investigated sleep duration and quality in pregnant women, assessing factors with possibly influence on sleep. Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on pregnant women between
[...] Read more.
Objectives: Good maternal health and fetal development require sufficient and good quality of sleep during pregnancy. This study investigated sleep duration and quality in pregnant women, assessing factors with possibly influence on sleep. Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted on pregnant women between June and August in 2015 in 16 hospitals in five provinces in China. A total of 2345 pregnant women aged 18 years and older were surveyed. Insufficient sleeping duration was defined as sleeping of less than 7 h per day. Excessive sleep duration was defined as sleeping of more than 9 h per day. Results: A total of 561 (23.9%) participants reported insufficient sleeping duration, whereas 485 (20.9%) claimed excessive sleep duration. A total of 358 (15.2%) of pregnant women reported problems regarding sleep quality. Compared to pregnant women with sufficient sleeping duration, those with insufficient sleeping duration were prone to have poor sleep quality, whereas those with excessive sleeping duration featured low possibility of poor sleep quality. High-risk groups of insufficient sleep duration include women of Han nationality, with siblings, in their first trimester of pregnancy, receiving care in low-capacity/quality hospital settings, and with daily or 1–3 days of secondhand smoke exposure. High-risk groups of excessive sleep duration include women living in rural areas, unemployed, in their third trimester of pregnancy, and receiving care in medium-capacity/quality hospital settings. High-risk groups of poor sleep quality include women of non-Han nationality, low income level, in their third trimester of pregnancy, and with insufficient sleep duration. Conclusions: Insufficient/excessive sleep duration and poor sleep quality commonly occur during pregnancy in China. Findings provide a better understanding of the influencing factors of insufficient/excessive sleep duration and poor quality of sleep. These findings have some implications for future interventions on sleep among pregnant women. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
Open AccessArticle Association between Visual Impairment and Low Vision and Sleep Duration and Quality among Older Adults in South Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 811; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070811
Received: 6 June 2017 / Revised: 7 July 2017 / Accepted: 18 July 2017 / Published: 19 July 2017
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Abstract
This study aims to estimate the association between visual impairment and low vision and sleep duration and poor sleep quality in a national sample of older adults in South Africa. A national population-based cross-sectional Study of Global Ageing and Adults Health (SAGE) wave
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This study aims to estimate the association between visual impairment and low vision and sleep duration and poor sleep quality in a national sample of older adults in South Africa. A national population-based cross-sectional Study of Global Ageing and Adults Health (SAGE) wave 1 was conducted in 2008 with a sample of 3840 individuals aged 50 years or older in South Africa. The interviewer-administered questionnaire assessed socio-demographic characteristics, health variables, sleep duration, quality, visual impairment, and vision. Results indicate that 10.0% of the sample reported short sleep duration (≤5 h), 46.6% long sleep (≥9 h), 9.3% poor sleep quality, 8.4% self-reported and visual impairment (near and/or far vision); and 43.2% measured low vision (near and/or far vision) (0.01–0.25 decimal) and 7.5% low vision (0.01–0.125 decimal). In fully adjusted logistic regression models, self-reported visual impairment was associated with short sleep duration and poor sleep quality, separately and together. Low vision was only associated with long sleep duration and poor sleep quality in unadjusted models. Self-reported visual impairment was related to both short sleep duration and poor sleep quality. Population data on sleep patterns may want to include visual impairment measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
Open AccessArticle Place of Birth and Sleep Duration: Analysis of the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 738; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070738
Received: 26 May 2017 / Revised: 29 June 2017 / Accepted: 4 July 2017 / Published: 7 July 2017
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Abstract
While sleep disturbance has been related to a number of negative health outcomes, few studies have examined the relationship between place of birth and sleep duration among individuals living in the US. Data for 416,152 adult participants in the 2000–2013 National Health Interview
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While sleep disturbance has been related to a number of negative health outcomes, few studies have examined the relationship between place of birth and sleep duration among individuals living in the US. Data for 416,152 adult participants in the 2000–2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), who provided self-reported hours of sleep and place of birth were examined. Associations were explored between healthy sleep (7–8 h), referenced to unhealthy sleep (<7 or >8 h), and place of birth using multivariate logistic regression analysis. The mean age of the sample was 47.4 ± 0.03 years; 56% were female. Of the respondents, 61.5% reported experiencing healthy sleep, 81.5% reported being born in the US and 18.5% were foreign-born adults. Descriptive statistics revealed that Indian Subcontinent-born respondents (71.7%) were more likely to report healthy sleep compared to US-born respondents (OR = 1.53, 95% CI = 1.37–1.71, p < 0.001), whereas African-born respondents (43.5%) were least likely to report healthy sleep (OR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.70–0.87, p < 0.001). These findings suggest that place of birth should be considered in the assessment of risk factors for unhealthy sleep. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)
Open AccessArticle Differences in Sleep Duration among Four Different Population Groups of Older Adults in South Africa
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(5), 502; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14050502
Received: 21 March 2017 / Revised: 4 May 2017 / Accepted: 4 May 2017 / Published: 9 May 2017
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Abstract
The study aims to investigate sleep duration in four different population groups in a national probability sample of older South Africans who participated in the Study of Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) Wave 1. A national population-based cross-sectional study with a sample
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The study aims to investigate sleep duration in four different population groups in a national probability sample of older South Africans who participated in the Study of Global Ageing and Adult Health (SAGE) Wave 1. A national population-based cross-sectional study with a sample of 3284 aged 50 years or older in South Africa was conducted in 2008. The questionnaire included socio-demographic characteristics, health variables, and self-reported sleep duration. Results indicate that White Africans compared to other population groups had the lowest mean sleep duration (7.88 h among men and 7.46 h among women). The prevalence of short sleep was the highest among both men and women among the White African (18.8% in men and 16.9% in women) and Indian or Asian African population groups (14.5% in men and 17.1% in women), and lowest among both men and women in the Black African (7.0% in men and 6.5% in women) and multi-ancestry population groups (15.6% in men and 12.7% in women). The prevalence of long sleep was among both men and women the highest in the Black African population group (56.2% in men and 58.5% in women), and the lowest in the White African population group (36.4% in men and 24.3% in women). In a Poisson regression model, adjusted for sociodemographics and chronic disease status, coming from the male and female White African population group was associated with short sleep. In addition, coming from the Indian or Asian African population group was associated with short sleep. No population group differences were found regarding long sleep prevalence. White Africans reported more short sleep duration than the other population groups, while there were no racial or ethnic differences in long sleep. White Africans are more likely to have sleep durations that are associated with negative health outcomes. An explanation of the high short sleep prevalence among White Africans may be related to their racial or ethnic minority status in South Africa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sleep Health)

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Article: Black-White Differences in Housing Type and Sleep Duration as well as Sleep Difficulties in the United States
Authors: Chandra L. Jackson, PhD, MS*1, Dayna A. Johnson, PhD, MPH, MS*2, Roland J. Thorpe, Jr., PhD3
Affiliation:
1 Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA
2 Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA
3 Hopkins Center for Health Disparities Solutions, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
*co-first authors
Abstract: Racial minority populations are disproportionately affected by adverse neighborhood environments and housing conditions that may lead to insufficient sleep duration and sleep difficulties. However, research is particularly limited in exploring housing type as a contributor to racial/ethnic differences in sleep. Using self-reported data from the National Health Interview Survey, we investigated racial differences in the association between housing type (house/apartment, mobile home/trailer, non-transient hotel) and sleep duration that was corrected for measurement error as well as sleep difficulties. Results may provide important insights regarding variation in housing and sleep; as well as help to identify those most at-risk in order to target interventions focused on reducing sleep disparities.

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