Special Issue "Non-Technical Perspectives for Improving Safety in the Workplace"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Assoc. Prof. Dr. Marco Giovanni Mariani
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Alma Mater Studiorum—University of Bologna, 40100 Bologna BO, Italy
Interests: safety motivation and behavior; personnel selection; professional development
Prof. Dr. Dina Guglielmi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Education Studies, Alma Mater Studiorum—University of Bologna, 40126 Bologna BO, Italy
Interests: professional development; well-being and health at work

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of IJERPH, we are organizing a Special Issue about the psychosocial factors and processes associated with safety in the workplace. IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes manuscripts in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health.

Existing data on accidents and safety show that we have much to gain from a deeper understanding of the factors that affect workplace safety. In recent years, researchers have been allocating increasing attention to workplace safety, as well as psychosocial factors and the processes involved. Beus et al. (2016) defined an integrated safety model, which summarized the existing knowledge on safety theories. This model highlighted how personal resources (e.g., cognitive, emotional), safety knowledge, safety motivations, and social factors in the workplace have an essential role in safe/unsafe work behaviors and the occurrence of accidents.

Based on several theoretical models that support the importance of non-technical perspectives, the aim of this Special Issue is to study the underlying psychosocial processes of safety behaviors, by exploring ways in which safety performance, and the related level of safety, can be enhanced by working on psychosocial factors such as perceptions, attitudes, motivations, skills, and emotions.

We invite the submission of high-quality conceptual and empirical papers. We would appreciate the use of a range of theoretical and methodological approaches, including qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods. Lastly, we encourage interdisciplinary collaborations and perspectives. We also welcome high-quality case studies of psycho-social safety issues explored in real contexts. Suggested themes might relate to, but are certainly not limited to, safety climate and culture, motivation, safety participation, safety leadership, risk perceptions, safety training and assessment, and non-technical skills and sustainability.

Assoc. Prof. Marco Giovanni Mariani
Prof. Dina Guglielmi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Human error
  • Leadership
  • Mindful organizing
  • Motivation
  • Non-Technical skills
  • Resilience
  • Risk Perception
  • Safety Citizenship
  • Safety Climate
  • Safety Performance
  • Safety (and risks) of new technologies
  • Safety training

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Safety Doesn’t Happen by Accident: A Longitudinal Investigation on the Antecedents of Safety Behavior
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(12), 4332; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17124332 - 17 Jun 2020
Abstract
Research recognizes the shared perceptions of the priority attributed to safety in comparison to other organizational goals (i.e., safety climate) as a potential antecedent of safety behavior among construction workers. This type of climate can dismantle barriers to the promotion of effective strategies [...] Read more.
Research recognizes the shared perceptions of the priority attributed to safety in comparison to other organizational goals (i.e., safety climate) as a potential antecedent of safety behavior among construction workers. This type of climate can dismantle barriers to the promotion of effective strategies to mitigate workplace hazards. On the other hand, the current understanding of the underlying process that links the perception of a safety climate to the implementation of safety behavior is far from being exhaustive. Accordingly, this study aimed to explore the role of risk perception and safety knowledge in explaining the positive impact of safety climate before attending a training course (Time 0) and safety behavior after the training completion (Time 1). Data were collected at two time-points on a sample of N = 278 construction workers taking part in different safety training courses promoted by a vocational training organization in Northern Italy. The hypothesized relationships were tested using a serial mediation model bootstrapping approach. The obtained results indicated that the perception of a safety climate at Time 0 (T0) among construction workers is associated with higher risk perception and safety knowledge that, in turn, resulted in a higher implementation of safety behavior at Time 1 (T1). These findings contribute to the understanding of those factors that constitute a fertile ground for preventing injuries and accidents in the construction sector. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Technical Perspectives for Improving Safety in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Understanding the Sociocognitive Process of Construction Workers’ Unsafe Behaviors: An Agent-Based Modeling Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1588; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051588 - 01 Mar 2020
Abstract
Previous literature has recognized that workers’ unsafe behavior is the combined result of both isolated individual cognitive processes and their interaction with others. Based on the consideration of both individual cognitive factors and social organizational factors, this paper aims to develop an Agent-Based [...] Read more.
Previous literature has recognized that workers’ unsafe behavior is the combined result of both isolated individual cognitive processes and their interaction with others. Based on the consideration of both individual cognitive factors and social organizational factors, this paper aims to develop an Agent-Based Modeling (ABM) approach to explore construction workers’ sociocognitive processes under the interaction with managers, coworkers, and foremen. The developed model is applied to explore the causes of cognitive failure of construction workers and the influence of social groups and social organizational factors on the workers’ unsafe behavior. The results indicate that (1) workers’ unsafe behaviors are gradually reduced with the interaction with managers, foremen, and workers; (2) the foreman is most influential in reducing workers’ unsafe behaviors, and their demonstration role can hardly be ignored; (3) the failure of sociocognitive process of construction workers is affected by many factors, and cognitive process errors could be corrected under social norms; and (4) among various social organizational factors, social identity has the most obvious effect on reducing workers’ unsafe behaviors, and preventive measures are more effective than reactive measures in reducing workers’ unsafe behaviors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Technical Perspectives for Improving Safety in the Workplace)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Social Safety Capital on Safety Citizenship Behavior: The Mediation of Autonomous Safety Motivation
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(3), 866; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17030866 - 30 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
In recent years, the safety issue of construction workers has become a research hotspot, and many researchers have achieved results in the impact of safety behavior regarding China’s construction industry. However, the existing research about the driving factors of safety citizenship behavior is [...] Read more.
In recent years, the safety issue of construction workers has become a research hotspot, and many researchers have achieved results in the impact of safety behavior regarding China’s construction industry. However, the existing research about the driving factors of safety citizenship behavior is insufficient. To fill this gap, this paper explores the driving factor of safety citizenship behavior from the perspective of social capital theory. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey, involving 311 Chinese construction workers, was conducted to verify the influence of Social Safety Capital on Safety Citizenship Behavior. The results showed that safety citizenship behavior made by workers was significantly related to social safety capital. Autonomous safety motivation mediated the relationships between social safety capital and safety citizenship behavior. Further, this research supports the differences between social safety capital and autonomous safety motivation. Specifically, the paper found that social safety capital had the largest regression coefficient for participation of suggestion-making, and autonomous safety motivation had the largest regression coefficient for the relationship between superior and subordinate by multiple regression analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-Technical Perspectives for Improving Safety in the Workplace)
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