Special Issue "Understanding Psychosocial Wellbeing in the Context of Complex and Multidimensional Problems"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2019).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Francisco José Eiroa-Orosa
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychobiology, University of Barcelona, 08035 Barcelona, Spain
Interests: recovery; peer support; psychosocial wellbeing; addictions

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on the topic of how people and social groups face the problems of an increasingly complex and globalized society. This includes mainly, but not only, the interaction of psychosocial well-being and mental health with economic, gender, racial, and ethnical inequalities; migration and demographic change; conflict and war; and the effects of stigma on people discriminated because of their differential characteristics, whether sexual, disability-related, or minority membership-related.

We make this proposal because we believe that, despite the introduction of the Biopsychosocial model in the late seventies as a paradigm of integration of different disciplinary views, research in mental health and psychosocial wellbeing is still highly fragmented. For decades, we have tried to advance by emphasizing a part of the equation, with results that are at least modest. Therefore, in this Special Issue we want to prioritize the works that attempt disciplinary and methodological integration.

This Special Issue is open to any subject area related to the impacts of social issues on mental health and psychosocial wellbeing. We are interested in empirical and theoretical enquiries at all ecological levels, from the psychosocial impact of social dynamics on individuals to the analysis of how sociocultural and geopolitical factors influence health and collective psychosocial well-being.

Dr. Francisco José Eiroa-Orosa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

We encourage prospective authors to submit a 350 word abstract by 28 February 2019 for consideration and feedback by the Guest Editors. Authors whose abstracts are accepted will be invited to submit a full manuscript. Subject to the decision of the Special issue editors, up to 3-5 manuscripts accepted through this process will receive a waiver of the normal Journal publication fee. In addition, authors may submit their paper through the normal journal submission process and the usual journal processing fee of 1600 CHF will apply. Please note that for papers submitted after 31 December 2018 an APC of 1800 CHF applies. All manuscripts will be subject to the journal’s normal peer review process.

Keywords

  • health systems
  • mental health
  • psychosocial wellbeing
  • sociocultural change
  • care systems transformation

Published Papers (12 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Understanding Psychosocial Wellbeing in the Context of Complex and Multidimensional Problems
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(16), 5937; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17165937 - 15 Aug 2020
Abstract
This Special Issue deals with the topic of how people and social groups face problems in an increasingly complex and globalized society. The topics included in the call for papers were the interaction of psychosocial well-being and mental health with economic, gender, racial [...] Read more.
This Special Issue deals with the topic of how people and social groups face problems in an increasingly complex and globalized society. The topics included in the call for papers were the interaction of psychosocial well-being and mental health with economic, gender, racial and ethnic inequalities, migration and demographic change and conflict and war, as well as the effects of stigma on people discriminated against because of their differential characteristics, whether they are of a sexual, disability or other minority. We made this proposal because we believed that, despite the introduction of the biopsychosocial model in the late 1970s as a paradigm of the integration of different disciplinary views, research in mental health and psychosocial well-being is still highly fragmented. For decades, we have tried to advance by emphasizing a part of the equation, with results that are at least modest. Therefore, in this Special Issue, we prioritized works aiming at disciplinary and methodological integration. The Special Issue was open to any subject area related to the impacts of social issues on mental health and psychosocial well-being. We were interested in empirical and theoretical enquiries at all ecological levels, from the psychosocial impact of social dynamics on individuals, to the analysis of how sociocultural and geopolitical factors influence health and collective psychosocial well-being. Full article

Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Mediating Role of Psychological Capital between Motivational Orientations and Their Organizational Consequences
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(13), 4864; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17134864 - 06 Jul 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Just as we can speak of different personality traits, it is also possible to identify distinct motivational traits, which may be related to a series of organizational consequences. In this sense, understanding how these traits are related to workers performance is fundamental. Specifically, [...] Read more.
Just as we can speak of different personality traits, it is also possible to identify distinct motivational traits, which may be related to a series of organizational consequences. In this sense, understanding how these traits are related to workers performance is fundamental. Specifically, the purpose of this study is to test the mediating role of psychological capital in the relationship between such traits and organizational citizenship behaviors and counterproductive work behaviors, which is expected to be more significant in the first case. The study was carried out using a panel design, with a sample group of Spanish employees aged over 40 (n = 741), in two waves (with a 4-month interval). The results support the hypothesis that psychological capital resources may play a mediating role in some of the relationships explored and that approach orientation traits are mainly related to a better performance, fostering organizational citizenship behaviors and diminishing counterproductive work behavior. The findings show that employees who develop their personal resources may have a positive impact on their organizations. The implications of this study for counseling practices are discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Living in the Restoration Public Housing after the Great East Japan Earthquake Correlates with Lower Subjective Well-Being of Older Adults
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(15), 2696; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16152696 - 28 Jul 2019
Cited by 7
Abstract
We aimed to (1) describe the subjective well-being (SWB) of older residents in Fukushima Prefecture seven years and seven months after the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE) and examine the effect of relocation to the restoration public housing (RPH) on SWB, social capital, [...] Read more.
We aimed to (1) describe the subjective well-being (SWB) of older residents in Fukushima Prefecture seven years and seven months after the Great East Japan Earthquake (GEJE) and examine the effect of relocation to the restoration public housing (RPH) on SWB, social capital, and health indicators; and (2) investigate the association between social capital and SWB. Questionnaires were administered to collect data of both RPH and non-RPH residents (≥65 years). Respondents’ SWB was collected via the Japanese version of the World Health Organization Five Well-Being Index. Additionally, residents’ social capital (trust, reciprocity, and participation), physical activity level, social network, functional health, history of chronic disease, and demographic data were collected. We analyzed 101 responses (valid response rate: approximately 34%) from RPH and 158 (53%) from non-RPH residents. SWB was lower in RPH compared to non-RPH residents but not statistically significant. Older RPH residents may demonstrate lower social capital and health indicators after the GEJE. Mistrust was found to be positively associated with low SWB in RPH residents. Future studies should examine the effectiveness of support for enhancing the trust of older RPH residents regarding, for example, the involvement of scientists—including medical professionals—in risk communications in promoting SWB. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Time Matters Differently in Leisure Experience for Men and Women: Leisure Dedication and Time Perspective
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(14), 2513; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16142513 - 14 Jul 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
There are inequalities with respect to the amount of time men and women spend on leisure. Therefore, it can be assumed that these inequalities are also manifested in the experiences derived from leisure activities and in certain attitudes to life associated with the [...] Read more.
There are inequalities with respect to the amount of time men and women spend on leisure. Therefore, it can be assumed that these inequalities are also manifested in the experiences derived from leisure activities and in certain attitudes to life associated with the amount of time devoted to leisure, which emphasize time orientations towards the past, present and future. Based on these ideas, this study analyses the time spent on leisure activities, leisure experience (i.e., perceptions of freedom and satisfaction), and the five factors of the time perspective (hedonistic and fatalistic present; positive and negative past; and future orientation). Participants were 435 men and 434 women, ranging from 18 to 24 years (sample mean M = 21.14, standard deviation SD = 1.99). Two tools were used: a questionnaire about leisure experience, based on the time budget technique, and the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory. The results show significant gender differences: men have more leisure time, but women have a more positive leisure experience and time perspectives than men. It can be concluded that women enjoy themselves more with less available leisure time and are more positive with regard to time orientations. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring the Reliability and Validity of the Huntington’s Disease Quality of Life Battery for Carers (HDQoL-C) within A Polish Population
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(13), 2323; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16132323 - 30 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a rare genetic neurodegenerative disorder that causes motor disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms and a progressing deterioration of cognitive functions. Complex issues resulting from the hereditary nature of HD, the complexity of symptoms and the concealed onset of the disease have [...] Read more.
Huntington’s disease (HD) is a rare genetic neurodegenerative disorder that causes motor disorders, neuropsychiatric symptoms and a progressing deterioration of cognitive functions. Complex issues resulting from the hereditary nature of HD, the complexity of symptoms and the concealed onset of the disease have a great impact on the quality of life of family carers. The caregivers are called the “forgotten people” in HD, especially with relation to genetic counseling. This study aims to explore the reliability and validity of the Huntington’s Disease Quality of Life Battery for carers (HDQoL-C) within a Polish population. A total of 90 carers recruited from the Enroll-HD study in Polish research centers of the European Huntington’s Disease Network completed a polish translation of the HDQoL-C. Data were subjected to Principle Components Analysis (PCA) and reliability measures. The Polish version of the shortened versions of the HDQoL-C is similarly valid compared to the original English version and suitable for use within this population. The HDQoL-C has previously demonstrated a wide range of benefits for practitioners in capturing and understanding carer experience and these benefits can now be extended to Polish speaking populations. Full article
Open AccessArticle
The Potential Psychological Mechanism of Subjective Well-Being in Migrant Workers: A Structural Equation Models Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2229; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16122229 - 24 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the potential psychological mechanism of well-being in migrants in Shanghai, China. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2018. First, a literature review was conducted to understand the salutogenesis of migrants in [...] Read more.
Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the potential psychological mechanism of well-being in migrants in Shanghai, China. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2018. First, a literature review was conducted to understand the salutogenesis of migrants in China. Then, 2573 random participants were recruited from six workplaces and public places in six districts of Shanghai. The Chinese versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Personal Wellbeing Index (PWI), and the Sense of Coherence (SOC) Scale were used to evaluate the depression, subjective well-being (SWB), and SOC of migrants. The t-test, ANOVA, and multiple linear regression and structural equation models (SEM) were used to analyze the correlations and paths among generalized resistant resources (GRRs), SOC, PHQ, and SWB. Results: The subjects were aged between 18 and 58 (mean, 28.17; SD, 6.99). SOC showed a positive correlation with SWB (r = 0.46, p < 0.001) and a negative correlation to PHQ (r = −0.53, p < 0.001). After controlling for the demographic characteristics, we found that PHQ, SOC (comprehensibility, manageability, meaningfulness), and GRRs (income ratio, marital status) contributed 33.3% of the variance in SWB, and their linear regression coefficients were: −0.32 (p < 0.001), 0.09 (p < 0.001), 0.09 (p < 0.001), 0.15 (p < 0.001), 0.06 (p < 0.05), and 0.16 (p < 0.05), respectively. These findings not only confirmed the direct association among SOC, PHQ and SWB, but also verified two underlying mechanisms regarding the mediating effect of SOC by using SEM: (1) GRRs (income ratio, marital status) are positively associated with a higher SOC, which further contributes to favorable SWB; and (2) PHQ is negatively associated with poor SWB indirectly via SOC. Conclusion: Migrant workers with low SOC and high PHQ are vulnerable to poor well-being levels. Meanwhile, GRRs (income ratio, marital status) may strengthen the SOC level, and can be regarded as the basis of intervention. Further investigation may be needed to focus on external psychological support factors. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Psychological Distress, Family Support and Employment Status in First-Year University Students in Spain
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1209; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071209 - 04 Apr 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
Mental disorders are consistently and closely related to psychological distress. At the start of the university period, the relationship between a student’s psychological distress, family support, and employment status is not well-known. The aims of this study were: To determine the prevalence of [...] Read more.
Mental disorders are consistently and closely related to psychological distress. At the start of the university period, the relationship between a student’s psychological distress, family support, and employment status is not well-known. The aims of this study were: To determine the prevalence of psychological distress in first-year university students and to analyze its relationship with family support and the student’s employment status. Data from 4166 first-year university students from nine universities across Spain were considered. The prevalence of psychological distress was obtained using the GHQ-12, a valid and reliable screening tool to detect poor mental health. To analyze the relationship between psychological distress, family support, and employment status, logistic regression models were fitted. Regarding the prevalence found, 46.9% of men and 54.2% of women had psychological distress. In both genders, psychological distress levels increased as family support decreased. Among women, psychological distress was associated with their employment status. The prevalence of psychological distress among first-year university students in Spain is high. In addition, family support, and employment status for women, could be factors to take into account when developing psychological distress prevention strategies at the beginning of the university period. Full article
Open AccessArticle
The Association of the Exposure to Work-Related Traumatic Events and Work Limitations among Firefighters: A Cross-Sectional Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 756; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050756 - 02 Mar 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Many firefighters suffering from traumatic events while on duty participate in the work force. However, the impact of work-related traumatic events on work performance is unclear. To address this issue, we administered a work-related traumatic event experience survey, the health-related work limitations questionnaire, [...] Read more.
Many firefighters suffering from traumatic events while on duty participate in the work force. However, the impact of work-related traumatic events on work performance is unclear. To address this issue, we administered a work-related traumatic event experience survey, the health-related work limitations questionnaire, the Korea Depression Scale, and the World Health Organization quality of life assessment to firefighters from four cities in Korea. The health-related work limitations questionnaire measured limitations in their ability to perform three specific work demands—physical, psychosocial, and environmental. Of 685 firefighters enrolled in the study, 618 (90.2%) were included in the final analyses. Their mean age ± standard deviation (SD) was 41.1 ± 8.0 years and mean employment period ± SD was 163.0 ± 101.2 months. A large percentage of participants reported they had experienced work-related traumatic events. Among the firefighters, the total work limitation prevalence was 21.5%, 16.8% of them were limited in their abilities to perform physical work demands, 15.5% were limited in performing psychosocial work demands, and 13.8% were limited in their abilities to function without difficulty within the ambient work environment. Based on multivariable logistic regression, with having work-related traumatic event experience of a threat or injury to self, the odds ratio (OR) of having work limitations in physical (OR = 3.32, 95% CI = 1.17–9.41), psychosocial (OR = 3.05, 95% CI = 1.08–8.61), environmental (OR = 4.89, 95% CI = 1.66–14.40) work demands, and total work limitation (OR = 3.73, 95% CI = 1.44–9.68) increased significantly. With experiences of treating fatalities or injured patients, the OR of total work limitation increased significantly (OR = 2.07, 95% CI = 1.09–3.91). We demonstrated a relationship between the firefighters’ exposure to work-related traumatic events and their work limitations. A professional care management system for firefighters to prevent and manage work-related traumatic events should be developed in order to protect and improve their performance ability. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Internet-Delivered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Young Taiwanese Female Nursing Students with Irritable Bowel Syndrome—A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(5), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16050708 - 27 Feb 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is prevalent within the general population. Studies have shown that stress and anxiety co-exist with IBS. Young Taiwanese women commonly exhibit physical and psychological health problems caused by academic stress. The purpose of our current study was to evaluate [...] Read more.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is prevalent within the general population. Studies have shown that stress and anxiety co-exist with IBS. Young Taiwanese women commonly exhibit physical and psychological health problems caused by academic stress. The purpose of our current study was to evaluate the efficacy of short-term Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) on female nursing students in practicum. We performed a cluster randomized controlled trial comprised of 160 participants who met the inclusion criteria, which were divided into three groups: (1) ICBT, (2) expressive writing (EW), and (3) wait-list control. Treatment interventions lasted for 6 weeks. Levels of anxiety, depression, and IBS symptoms were assessed at four time points, baseline assessment at T0, 2 weeks after T0 (T1), at the end of practicum (T2), and at 3-month follow-up (T3). The results showed that ICBT and EW groups exhibited a significant, yet small, reduction in anxiety and depression at T2 and T3 compared to the wait-list control group. The EW group exhibited significantly greater reduction in anxiety and depression compared to the ICBT group at T2. However, the ICBT group demonstrated greater improvements in alleviating anxiety and depression at T3 compared to the EW group. These data indicate that ICBT and EW groups exhibited small effects on anxiety and depression reduction at T2 and T3 compared to the wait-list control group, with no effects on IBS symptoms in young Taiwanese female nursing students. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
An Instrument to Measure Mental Health Professionals’ Beliefs and Attitudes towards Service Users’ Rights
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(2), 244; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16020244 - 16 Jan 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
We aimed at developing and validating a scale on the beliefs and attitudes of mental health professionals towards services users’ rights in order to provide a valid evaluation instrument for training activities with heterogeneous mental health professional groups. Items were extracted from a [...] Read more.
We aimed at developing and validating a scale on the beliefs and attitudes of mental health professionals towards services users’ rights in order to provide a valid evaluation instrument for training activities with heterogeneous mental health professional groups. Items were extracted from a review of previous instruments, as well as from several focus groups which have been conducted with different mental health stakeholders, including mental health service users. The preliminary scale consisted of 44 items and was administered to 480 mental health professionals. After eliminating non-discriminant and low weighting items, a final scale of 25 items was obtained. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses produced a four-factor solution consisting of the following four dimensions; system criticism/justifying beliefs, freedom/coercion, empowerment/paternalism, and tolerance/discrimination. The scale shows high concordance with our theoretical model as well as adequate parameters of explained variance, model fit, and internal reliability. Additional work is required to assess the cultural equivalence and psychometrics of this tool in other settings and populations, including health students. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Exploring Behavior of People with Suicidal Ideation in a Chinese Online Suicidal Community
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 54; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010054 - 26 Dec 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
People with suicidal ideation (PSI) are increasingly using social media to express suicidal feelings. Researchers have found that their internet-based communication may lead to the spread of suicidal ideation, which presents a set of challenges for suicide prevention. To develop effective prevention and [...] Read more.
People with suicidal ideation (PSI) are increasingly using social media to express suicidal feelings. Researchers have found that their internet-based communication may lead to the spread of suicidal ideation, which presents a set of challenges for suicide prevention. To develop effective prevention and intervention strategies that can be efficiently applied in online communities, we need to understand the behavior of PSI in internet-based communities. However, to date there have been no studies that specifically focus on the behavior of PSI in Chinese online communities. A total of 4489 postings in which users explicitly expressed their suicidal ideation were labeled from 560,000 postings in an internet-based suicidal community on Weibo (one of the biggest social media platforms in China) to explore their behavior. The results reveal that PSI are significantly more active than other users in the community. With the use of social network analysis, we also found that the more frequently users communicate with PSI, the more likely that users would become suicidal. In addition, Chinese women may be more likely to be at risk of suicide than men in the community. This study enriches our knowledge of PSI’s behavior in online communities, which may contribute to detecting and assisting PSI on social media. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Eudaimonic Well-Being and Coping with Stress in University Students: The Mediating/Moderating Role of Self-Efficacy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010048 - 25 Dec 2018
Cited by 10
Abstract
The importance of personal psychological resources in preventing academic stress has enjoyed little attention to date, despite the high rates of stress that exist among university students. This article analyzes the effect of eudaimonic well-being on the use of adaptive strategies for coping [...] Read more.
The importance of personal psychological resources in preventing academic stress has enjoyed little attention to date, despite the high rates of stress that exist among university students. This article analyzes the effect of eudaimonic well-being on the use of adaptive strategies for coping with academic stress. Moreover, it analyzes the role of self-efficacy as a mediator and moderator of this relationship. In the mediation model, gender is included as a co-variable; in the moderation model, gender is included as a moderator. A total of 1402 university students participated in the study. The data were gathered through validated self-report instruments. The mediation analyses were performed using the PROCESS module of the statistical package, SPSS. The moderating effects of self-efficacy and gender were analyzed through hierarchical regression analysis. The results indicate that self-efficacy partially mediates but does not moderate the relationship between eudaimonic well-being and adaptive coping strategies. This finding reveals the benefits of using these two personal resources to enhance effective coping with academic stress while attending university. Full article
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