Special Issue "The Challenges and Opportunities for Promoting Active Healthy Ageing"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Mark Tully
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
SITLESS Consortium, School of Health Sciences, Institute of Mental Health Sciences, Ulster University, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland
Interests: physical activity; sedentary behaviour; measurement of health behaviours; public health; interventions
Dr. Lee Smith
Website
Guest Editor
The Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, CB1 1PT Cambridge, UK
Interests: physical activity and health
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Nicole Blackburn
Website
Guest Editor
SITLESS Consortium, School of Health Sciences, Ulster University, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland
Interests: physical activity; sedentary behaviour; exercise rehabilitation; interventions; public health
Dr. Deepti Adlakha
Website
Guest Editor
School of Natural and Built Environment, Queen’s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland
Interests: urban design; city planning; built environment; walkability; public health; physical activity; healthy cities
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Paolo Caserotti
Website
Guest Editor
SITLESS Consortium, Center for Active and Healthy Ageing, Department of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
Interests: physical activity; sedentary behaviour; exercise; accelerometry; muscle mechanical function and functional performance; nutrition; public health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

On behalf of IJERPH, we are organizing a Special Issue about the challenges and opportunities for promoting healthy active ageing. IJERPH is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes manuscripts in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health.

Population ageing is a global phenomenon. By 2050, it is expected that 17% of the world’s population will be over 65 years old with greater numbers of older adults worldwide than children under 16. With countries in Asia and sub-Saharan Africa set to see some of the biggest rises. To address the associated declines in physical and mental health, many health organisations have called for evidence on how best to promote physical activity and reduce sedentary behaviour in older adults. We are therefore interested in papers that advance our knowledge of the determinants of physical activity and sedentary behaviour in older adults as well as approaches to address them. These determinants would include individual, social, and environmental influences on behaviour. We anticipate that these questions may be addressed using a variety of methods including qualitative, spatial, longitudinal approaches, alongside natural experiments, controlled trials and systematic reviews.

Studies involving the following topics are welcome for this Special issue in IJERPH:

  • The association between physical and mental health outcomes associated with physical activity and sedentary behaviour
  • Assessment of physical activity and sedentary behaviour specifically designed for older adults
  • The influence of individual, social and built environment factors on physical activity and sedentary behaviour in older adults
  • The (cost) effectiveness of interventions targeting behaviour change in older adults
  • Studies involving ‘younger’ and ‘older’ older adults
  • Studies from the Global South, including, but not limited to, aspects of intergenerational living, social networks, participatory planning and ageing-in-place

Prof. Dr. Mark Tully
Dr. Lee Smith
Dr. Nicole Blackburn
Dr. Deepti Adlakha
Prof. Dr. Paolo Caserotti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Physical activity
  • Sedentary behaviour
  • Older adults
  • Determinants
  • Interventions

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
The Effectiveness of Individual or Group Physiotherapy in the Management of Sub-Acromial Impingement: A Randomised Controlled Trial and Health Economic Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(15), 5565; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17155565 - 01 Aug 2020
Abstract
Background: Shoulder pain is common in primary care. The management of subacromial impingement (SAI) can include corticosteroid injections and physiotherapy. Physiotherapy can be on an individual or group basis. Aim: To examine the clinical effectiveness and make an economic analysis of [...] Read more.
Background: Shoulder pain is common in primary care. The management of subacromial impingement (SAI) can include corticosteroid injections and physiotherapy. Physiotherapy can be on an individual or group basis. Aim: To examine the clinical effectiveness and make an economic analysis of individual versus group physiotherapy, following corticosteroid injection for SAI. Design and Setting: A single-blind, open-label, randomised equivalence study comparing group and individual physiotherapy. Patients referred by local general practitioners and physiotherapists were considered for inclusion. Method: Patients were randomised to individual or group physiotherapy groups, and all received corticosteroid injection before physiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was shoulder pain and disability index (SPADI) at 26 weeks. An economic analysis was conducted. Results and Conclusion: 136 patients were recruited, 68 randomised to each group. Recruitment was 68% of the target 200 participants. SPADI (from baseline to 26 weeks) demonstrated a difference (SE) in mean change between groups of −0.43 (5.7) (p-value = 0.050001), and the TOST (two-one-sided test for equivalence) 90% CI for this difference was (−10.0 to 9.14). This was borderline. In a secondary analysis using inputted data, patients without SPADI at week 26 were analysed by carrying forward scores at week 12 (mean difference (95% CI) = −0.14 (−7.5 to 7.3), p-value = 0.014). There is little difference in outcome at 26 weeks. Group physiotherapy was cheaper to deliver per patient (£252 versus £84). Group physiotherapy for SAI produces similar clinical outcomes to individual physiotherapy with potential cost savings. Due to low recruitment to our study, firm conclusions are difficult and further research is required to give a definitive answer to this research question. (NCT Clinical Trial Registration Number NCT04058522). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges and Opportunities for Promoting Active Healthy Ageing)
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Open AccessArticle
The Association Between Sedentary Behavior and Sarcopenia Among Adults Aged ≥65 Years in Low- and Middle-Income Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(5), 1708; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17051708 - 05 Mar 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The present study aimed to assess the association between sedentary behavior and sarcopenia among adults aged ≥65 years. Cross-sectional data from the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as having low skeletal muscle mass and either a [...] Read more.
The present study aimed to assess the association between sedentary behavior and sarcopenia among adults aged ≥65 years. Cross-sectional data from the Study on Global Ageing and Adult Health were analyzed. Sarcopenia was defined as having low skeletal muscle mass and either a slow gait speed or a weak handgrip strength. Self-reported sedentary behavior was assessed as a continuous variable (hours per day) and also as a categorical variable (0–<4, 4–<8, 8–<11, ≥11 hours/day). Multivariable logistic regression was conducted to assess the association between sedentary behavior and sarcopenia. Analyses using the overall sample and country-wise samples were conducted. A total of 14,585 participants aged ≥65 years were included in the analysis. Their mean age was 72.6 (standard deviation, 11.5) years and 55% were females. Compared to sedentary behavior of 0–<4 hours/day, ≥11 hours/day was significantly associated with 2.14 (95% CI = 1.06–4.33) times higher odds for sarcopenia. The country-wise analysis showed that overall, a one-hour increase in sedentary behavior per day was associated with 1.06 (95% CI = 1.04–1.10) times higher odds for sarcopenia, while the level of between-country heterogeneity was low (I2 = 12.9%). Public health and healthcare practitioners may wish to target reductions in sedentary behavior to aid in the prevention of sarcopenia in older adults. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges and Opportunities for Promoting Active Healthy Ageing)
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Open AccessProtocol
Increasing Physical Activity in Empty Nest and Retired Populations Online: A Randomized Feasibility Trial Protocol
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(10), 3544; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17103544 - 19 May 2020
Abstract
Despite the extensive evidence on the benefits of physical activity (PA) in older adults, including reduced risk of disease, mortality, falls, and cognitive and functional decline, most do not attain sufficient PA levels. Theoretical work suggests that behavioral change interventions are most effective [...] Read more.
Despite the extensive evidence on the benefits of physical activity (PA) in older adults, including reduced risk of disease, mortality, falls, and cognitive and functional decline, most do not attain sufficient PA levels. Theoretical work suggests that behavioral change interventions are most effective during life transitions, and as such, a theory-based, online intervention tailored for recently retired and empty nest individuals could lend support for increasing levels of PA. The aim of this study is to examine the feasibility of the intervention and study procedures for a future controlled trial. This study has a randomized controlled trial design with an embedded qualitative and quantitative process evaluation. Participants are randomized at 1:1 between the intervention and waitlist controls. Potential participants are within six months of their final child leaving the familial home or within six months of retiring (self-defined), currently not meeting the Canadian PA guidelines, have no serious contraindications to exercise, and are residing in Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Participants are recruited by online and print flyers as well as in-person at community events. The study aims to recruit 40 empty nest and 40 retired participants; half of each group received the intervention during the study period. The internet-delivered intervention is delivered over a 10-week period, comprising 10 modules addressing behavior change techniques associated with PA. Primary outcomes relate to recruitment, attrition, data collection, intervention delivery, and acceptability. Secondary behavioral outcomes are measured at baseline and post-treatment (10 weeks). Intervention-selected participants are invited to an optional qualitative exit interview. The results of this feasibility study will inform the planning of a randomized effectiveness trial, that will examine the behavior change, health-related fitness, and well-being outcomes by exploring how reflexive processes of habit and identity may bridge adoption and maintenance in behavioral adherence. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Challenges and Opportunities for Promoting Active Healthy Ageing)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Natural, built and social environment influences on older adults' mobility and well-being in metropolitan India
Authors: Deepti Adlakha
Affiliation: School of Natural and Built Environment, Queen’s University Belfast, University Road, Belfast, Co Antrim, Northern Ireland

Title: Increasing Physical Activity in Empty Nest and Retired Populations Online: A Randomized Feasibility Trial Protocol
Authors: Amy Cox; Ryan Rhodes
Affiliation: The University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada

Title: Evaluation of the Strength 4 Life programme: A Strength and Conditioning programme aimed at older adults
Authors: Tom Maden-Wilkinson; Rob Copeland
Affiliation: National Centre for Sport and Exercise Medicine – Sheffield, Sheffield Hallam University, UK

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