E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Heavy Metal Pollution and Health Risk Assessment"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Tetsuro Agusa

Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto 862-8502, Japan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: heavy metals; trace elements; arsenic; environmental pollution; human health effect; genetic susceptibility of chemicals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Heavy metal pollution of the environment and biota, including humans, is a serious problem in the world, especially in low- and middle-income countries with a rapid economic growth and increasing population. In these countries, severe pollution is frequently observed due to a lack of legal implementations and removal techniques, causing similar human health disasters to those that occurred in high-income countries in the past, such as the Minamata Disease and Itai Itai Disease. Groundwater pollution by arsenic or fluoride, which are naturally derived from aquifer, is also a critical issue, because groundwater is one of the most significant drinking water sources in some countries where clean sanitized water is not available in the required quantities. It is necessary to evaluate the spatiotemporal situation of metal pollution, estimate the future trends, assess the effects on human and wild animals, and mitigate such pollution. Furthermore, the development and usage of rare metals for industrial and medical use has recently increased. However, there is little information on the environmental behavior and toxicity of such rare metals up to now. Here, this Special Issue titled “Heavy Metal Pollution and Health Risk Assessment” of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health invites the submission of papers on the above areas to share recent knowledge on the environmental health issues of metals and to improve the quality of our ambient environment and, ultimately, to save our earth.

Prof. Dr. Tetsuro Agusa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Metal pollution in air
  • Metal pollution in soil
  • Metal pollution in water
  • Metal pollution in wild animals
  • Metal pollution in humans
  • Metal pollution in low- and middle-income countries
  • Health risk assessment of metal exposure in wild animals
  • Health risk assessment of metal exposure in humans

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Determinants of Erythrocyte Lead Levels in 454 Adults in Florence, Italy
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 425; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030425
Received: 6 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 31 January 2019 / Published: 1 February 2019
PDF Full-text (524 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Lead exposure, even at low levels, is associated with adverse health effects in humans. We investigated the determinants of individual lead levels in a general population-based sample of adults from Florence, Italy. Methods: Erythrocyte lead levels were measured (using inductively [...] Read more.
Background: Lead exposure, even at low levels, is associated with adverse health effects in humans. We investigated the determinants of individual lead levels in a general population-based sample of adults from Florence, Italy. Methods: Erythrocyte lead levels were measured (using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry) in 454 subjects enrolled in the Florence cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study in 1992–1998. Multiple linear regression models were used to study the association between demographics, education and working history, lifestyle, dietary habits, anthropometry, residential history, and (among women) menstrual and reproductive history and use of exogenous sex hormones, and erythrocyte lead levels. Results: Median lead levels were 86.1 μg/L (inter-quartile range 65.5–111.9 μg/L). Male gender, older age, cigarette smoking and number of pack-years, alcohol intake, and residing in urban areas were positively associated with higher erythrocyte lead levels, while performing professional/managerial or administrative work or being retired was inversely associated with lead levels. Among women, lead levels were higher for those already in menopause, and lower among those who ever used hormone replacement therapy. Conclusions: Avoidable risk factors contribute to the lead body burden among adults, which could therefore be lowered through targeted public health measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heavy Metal Pollution and Health Risk Assessment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle A Framework for Rice Heavy Metal Stress Monitoring Based on Phenological Phase Space and Temporal Profile Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(3), 350; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16030350
Received: 27 November 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 22 January 2019 / Published: 26 January 2019
PDF Full-text (2866 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Previous studies make it possible to use remote sensing techniques to monitor heavy metal stress of rice synchronously and continuously. However, most studies mainly focus on the analysis of rice’s visual symptoms and physiological functions rather than temporal information during the growth period, [...] Read more.
Previous studies make it possible to use remote sensing techniques to monitor heavy metal stress of rice synchronously and continuously. However, most studies mainly focus on the analysis of rice’s visual symptoms and physiological functions rather than temporal information during the growth period, which may reflect significant changes of rice under heavy metal stress. In this paper, an enhanced spatial and temporal adaptive reflectance fusion model was used to generate synthetic Landsat time series. A normalized difference water index and an enhanced vegetation index were employed to build phenological phase space. Then, the ratio of the rice growth rate fluctuation (GRFI Ratio) was constructed for discriminating the different heavy metal stress levels on rice. Results suggested that the trajectories of rice growth in phenological phase space can depict the similarities and differences of rice growth under different heavy metal stress levels. The most common phenological parameters in the phase space cannot accurately discriminate the heavy metal stress level. However, the GRFI Ratio that we proposed outperformed in discriminating different levels of heavy metal stress. This study suggests that this framework of detecting the heavy metal pollution in paddy filed based on phenological phase space and temporal profile analysis is promising. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heavy Metal Pollution and Health Risk Assessment)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle PM2.5-Bound Toxic Elements in an Urban City in East China: Concentrations, Sources, and Health Risks
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 164; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010164
Received: 10 December 2018 / Revised: 26 December 2018 / Accepted: 1 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
PDF Full-text (7192 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Concentrations of PM2.5-bound trace elements have increased in China, with increasing anthropogenic emissions. In this study, long-term measurements of PM2.5-bound trace elements were conducted from January 2014 to January 2015 in the urban city of Jinan, east China. A [...] Read more.
Concentrations of PM2.5-bound trace elements have increased in China, with increasing anthropogenic emissions. In this study, long-term measurements of PM2.5-bound trace elements were conducted from January 2014 to January 2015 in the urban city of Jinan, east China. A positive matrix factorization model (PMF) and health risk assessment were used to evaluate the sources and health risks of these elements, respectively. Compared with most Chinese megacities, there were higher levels of arsenic, manganese, lead, chromium, and zinc in this city. Coal combustion, the smelting industry, vehicle emission, and soil dust were identified as the primary sources of all the measured elements. Heating activities during the heating period led to a factor of 1.3–2.8 higher concentrations for PM2.5 and all measured elements than those during the non-heating period. Cumulative non-carcinogenic and carcinogenic risks of the toxic elements exceeded the safety levels by 8–15 and 10–18 times, respectively. Arsenic was the critical element having the greatest health risk. Coal combustion caused the highest risk among the four sources. This work provides scientific data for making targeted policies to control air pollutants and protect human health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Heavy Metal Pollution and Health Risk Assessment)
Figures

Figure 1

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top