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Special Issue "The Next Frontier in Health Geography: Context and Implications for Interventions"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2018

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Andrew Curtis

GIS Health and Hazards Lab, Department of Geography, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242-0001, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: spatial video geonarratives; GIS and context; fine scale health interventions; challenging environment spatial data collection
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jacqueline Curtis

GIS Health and Hazards Lab, Department of Geography, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44242-0001, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: neighborhood ecology; environmental perception; local knowledge; maternal child health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A growing body of evidence points to the complexity of geographic contexts in shaping health outcomes, and their implications for interventions. Despite awareness of this complexity, it is challenging for spatial investigations to fully account for its presence. For example, there is a dearth of guidance on the identification and representation of the dynamic spatial and temporal scales that often interact to yield a particular outcome. In addition to scale, questions are emerging about the suitability of “official” data, the potential role for local knowledge or other “unofficial” data, and how these potentially disparate sources can be meaningfully integrated in a Geographic Information System. To address such challenges, a new frontier of health geography is emerging; one that is focusing on new forms of geospatial technologies, novel methods and analytical approaches including customized software development, and means to capture physical and social context. In this Special Issue we invite researchers who use spatial data to showcase their new methods and applications for any health problem, in any health setting. The only limitations are that the project must highlight approaches that advance understanding of geographic context in health and its implications for intervention.

Prof. Dr. Andrew Curtis
Prof. Dr. Jacqueline Curtis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • GIS and Health
  • Health Geography
  • Medical Geography
  • Context
  • Spatial Epidemiology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Neighborhood Violence Impacts Disease Control and Surveillance: Case Study of Cali, Colombia from 2014 to 2016
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2144; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102144
Received: 24 August 2018 / Revised: 26 September 2018 / Accepted: 26 September 2018 / Published: 29 September 2018
PDF Full-text (5299 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Arboviruses are responsible for a large burden of disease globally and are thus subject to intense epidemiological scrutiny. However, a variable notably absent from most epidemiological analyses has been the impact of violence on arboviral transmission and surveillance. Violence impedes surveillance and delivery
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Arboviruses are responsible for a large burden of disease globally and are thus subject to intense epidemiological scrutiny. However, a variable notably absent from most epidemiological analyses has been the impact of violence on arboviral transmission and surveillance. Violence impedes surveillance and delivery of health and preventative services and affects an individual’s health-related behaviors when survival takes priority. Moreover, low and middle-income countries bear a disproportionately high burden of violence and related health outcomes, including vector borne diseases. To better understand the epidemiology of arboviral outbreaks in Cali, Colombia, we georeferenced chikungunya (CHIKV), dengue (DENV), and Zika (ZIKV) viral cases from The National System of Surveillance in Public Health between October 2014 and April 2016. We extracted homicide data from the municipal monthly reports and kernel density of homicide distribution from IdeasPaz. Crucially, an overall higher risk of homicide is associated with increased risk of reported DENV, lower rates of acute testing, and higher rates of lab versus clinical discordance. In the context of high violence as a potential barrier to access to preventive health services, a community approach to improve health and peace should be considered. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Topographies of Workplace Injury: A Spatial Contribution to an Emerging Social Insurance Model
Authors: Hamish Robertson, Nick Nicholas, Caroline Howe, Deborah Debono and Joanne Travaglia
Affiliation: Centre for Health Services Management, University Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Title: Spatially Filtered Multilevel Analysis of Spatial Determinants for Malaria Occurrences in Korea
Authors: Sehyeong Kim and Youngho Kim
Affiliation: Department of Geography Education, Korea University, Seoul, Korea

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