E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Land management accounting inter-correlations among soil erosion risk, cropping suitability and environmental footprint"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Yung-Chieh Wang

Department of Soil and Water Conservation, National Chung-Hsing University, 145 Xinga Road, South District, Taichung City, Taichung 402, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: soil physics; soil erosion; watershed management; soil–water environment and ecosystem; land use
Guest Editor
Dr. Li-Chi Chiang

Department of Civil and Disaster Prevention Engineering, National United University, Miaoli 36003, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +886 37 382367
Interests: integrated watershed management; non-point source pollution; environmental modeling and analysis; field observations; land use change simulation; ecosystem service evaluation; ecohydrology; GIS application on environmental research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the world population on the rise, society demands more resources. As a result, natural resources are overused, environmental quality is degraded, soil physical property is damaged, and soil fertility has declined. We are facing the growing problem of food scarcity and security. Increased population has not only led to more food consumption, but also reducing agricultural production by clearing of agricultural or forest land for human settlement. Deforestation has changed climatic patterns, leading more natural disasters. Increased human activities have degraded the lands and negatively impacted on agricultural productions. The goal of this Special Issue is to decipher the inter-correlations among disaster risks under extreme weather events, cropping suitability of environment, and environmental footprints of crops, as well as the collective impacts on land and ecosystems, and to formulate land management guidelines for securing food production and promoting sustainable agriculture development. These inter-correlations can be highlighted with publications of new research findings on the following topics:

  1. Analytical advances in measurements of environmental footprint.
  2. Theoretical considerations examining effects and solutions to food scarcity and security.
  3. Identifying the inter-correlations among disasters, food production, land management, and environmental sustainability.
  4. Novel models in measuring the inter-correlations at different spatio-temporal scales.
  5. Systematic management for food security, production, and sustainable agriculture.

 

This Special Issue includes the above topics, but is not limited to, any research related to how we can understand the causes of food scarcity and develop solutions for reaching sustainable agriculture. Our goal is to identify the inter-correlations among the soil erosion and disaster risks, cropping suitability of environment, and environmental footprints of crops, and to provide essential clues for land use management securing food production and agriculture sustainability under the pressure of global population booming and climate change impacts.

Dr. Yung-Chieh Wang
Dr. Li-Chi Chiang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food security
  • food scarcity
  • environmental footprint
  • land use management
  • sustainable agriculture
  • disaster prevention
  • soil erosion
  • ecosystem services
  • cropping suitability

Published Papers (9 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-9
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Spatiotemporal Variation of Sediment Export from Multiple Taiwan Watersheds
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(9), 1610; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16091610
Received: 11 April 2019 / Revised: 30 April 2019 / Accepted: 3 May 2019 / Published: 8 May 2019
PDF Full-text (6056 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Soil erosion and landslide triggered by heavy rainfall are serious problems that have threatened water resources in Taiwan watersheds. This study investigated the relationship among streamflow, sediment load, sediment concentration and typhoon characteristics (path and rainfall amount) during 2000–2017 for nine gauging stations [...] Read more.
Soil erosion and landslide triggered by heavy rainfall are serious problems that have threatened water resources in Taiwan watersheds. This study investigated the relationship among streamflow, sediment load, sediment concentration and typhoon characteristics (path and rainfall amount) during 2000–2017 for nine gauging stations in five basins (Tamshui River basin, Zhuoshui River basin, Zengwen River basin, Gaoping River basin, and Hualien River basin) representing the diverse geomorphologic conditions in Taiwan. The results showed that streamflow and sediment load were positively correlated, and the correlation was improved when the sediment load data were grouped by sediment concentration. Among these basins, the Zhuoshui River basin has the highest unit-discharge sediment load and unit-area sediment load. The soil in the upstream was more erodible than the downstream soil during the normal discharge conditions, indicating its unique geological characteristics and how typhoons magnified sediment export. The spatiotemporal variation in sediment loads from different watersheds was further categorized by typhoons of different paths. Although typhoon path types matter, the Zhuoshui and Hualien River basin were usually impacted by typhoons of any path type. The results indicated that sediment concentration, the watershed soil characteristics, and typhoons paths were the key factors for sediment loads. This study can be useful for developing strategies of soil and water conservation implementation for sustainable watershed management. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
137Cs-Based Variation of Soil Erosion in Vertical Zones of a Small Catchment in Southwestern China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(8), 1371; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16081371
Received: 4 April 2019 / Revised: 12 April 2019 / Accepted: 13 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1807 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The study of the variability of soil erosion in mountainous areas provides the basis for soil and water conservation work and forest ecological construction in a targeted way. In this study, Liangshan Town catchment, a typical catchment in the Hengduan Mountains region, southwest [...] Read more.
The study of the variability of soil erosion in mountainous areas provides the basis for soil and water conservation work and forest ecological construction in a targeted way. In this study, Liangshan Town catchment, a typical catchment in the Hengduan Mountains region, southwest China, was selected to investigate the variation of soil erosion in different vertical zones using the 137Cs tracing technique. The mean 137Cs reference inventories varied between 573.51 and 705.54 Bq/m2, with the elevation increasing from 1600 to 2600 m. The rates of soil erosion exhibited a significant variation. Under the same land cover condition, the average annual soil erosion modulus of high-elevation forest (elevation > 2200 m) was 400.3 t/(km2·a). However, the average annual soil erosion modulus of a low-elevation sparse forest (elevation < 1600 m) was as high as 1756 t/(km2·a). The average annual soil erosion modulus of the sloping farmland, mainly distributed at elevations of 1600–2200 m, was estimated to be 2771 t/(km2·a). These results indicate that effective soil management measures need to be implemented on the cultivated sloping land in the future. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Maize Potential Yield and Yield Gaps in Northeast China from 1990 to 2015
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(7), 1211; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16071211
Received: 20 February 2019 / Revised: 25 March 2019 / Accepted: 1 April 2019 / Published: 4 April 2019
PDF Full-text (5757 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Maize yield has undergone obvious spatial and temporal changes in recent decades in Northeast China. Understanding how maize potential yield has changed over the past few decades and how large the gaps between potential and actual maize yields are is essential for increasing [...] Read more.
Maize yield has undergone obvious spatial and temporal changes in recent decades in Northeast China. Understanding how maize potential yield has changed over the past few decades and how large the gaps between potential and actual maize yields are is essential for increasing maize yield to meet increased food demand in Northeast China. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of maize potential yield in Northeast China from 1990 to 2015 were simulated using the Global Agro-ecological Zones (GAEZ) model at the pixel level firstly. Then, the yield gaps between actual and potential yields were analyzed at city scale. The results were the following. (1) The maize potential yield decreased by about 500 kg/ha and the potential production remained at around 260 million tonnes during 1990–2000. From 2000 to 2015, the maize potential yield and production increased by approximately 1000 kg/ha and 80 million tonnes, respectively. (2) The maize potential yield decreased in most regions of Northeast China in the first decade, such as the center area (CA), south area (SA), southwest area (SWA), and small regions in northeast area (NEA), due to lower temperature and insufficient rainfall. The maize potential yield increased elsewhere. (3) The maize potential yield increased by more than 1000 kg/ha in the center area (CA) in the latter 15 years, which may be because of the climate warming and sufficient precipitation. The maize potential yield decreased elsewhere and Harbin in the center area (CA). (4) In 40 cities of Northeast China, the rates of actual yield to potential yield in 17 cities were higher than 80%. The actual yields only attained 50–80% of the potential yields in 20 cities. The gaps between actual and potential yields in Hegang and Dandong were very large, which need to be shrunk urgently. The results highlight the importance of coping with climate change actively, arranging crop structure reasonably, improving farmland use efficiency and ensuring food security in Northeast China. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Ecosystem Spatial Changes and Driving Forces in the Bohai Coastal Zone
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(4), 536; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16040536
Received: 17 December 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2019 / Accepted: 11 February 2019 / Published: 13 February 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (2794 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Landscape change is an important aspect of coastal ecological conservation and has an essential influence on the sustainable development of the coastal economy. With remoting-sensing (RS) images between 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015, using geographic information system (GIS) technologies, we examined ecosystem spatial [...] Read more.
Landscape change is an important aspect of coastal ecological conservation and has an essential influence on the sustainable development of the coastal economy. With remoting-sensing (RS) images between 2000, 2005, 2010, and 2015, using geographic information system (GIS) technologies, we examined ecosystem spatial changes in the Bohai coastal zone. Results showed that wetlands, mainly constituted by reservoirs/ponds, were the dominant landscape types. The urban ecosystem has the largest area increment and the fastest growth rate from 2000 to 2015. The quantification of landscape metrics revealed that spatial patterns have changed significantly, and the change direction of these ecosystems had moved toward increased heterogeneity and fragmentation. In addition, natural and socio-economic data were used to analyze the major driving forces triggering ecosystem spatial changes through redundancy analysis (RDA). The results revealed that the output of aquatic products (AQ) and population (Pop) were the main factors related to wetland ecosystem change. Pop and gross domestic product per capita (GDPpc) were closely related to the urban ecosystem change. Annual mean temperature (ATm), crop acreage (CA), and grain yield (GY) had positive correlations with the agriculture ecosystem changes. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Urban Metabolic Analysis of a Food-Water-Energy System for Sustainable Resources Management
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010090
Received: 9 December 2018 / Revised: 24 December 2018 / Accepted: 25 December 2018 / Published: 30 December 2018
PDF Full-text (2306 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Urban metabolism analyzes the supply and consumption of nutrition, material, energy, and other resources within cities. Food, water, and energy are critical resources for the human society and have complicated cooperative/competitive influences on each other. The management of interactive resources is essential for [...] Read more.
Urban metabolism analyzes the supply and consumption of nutrition, material, energy, and other resources within cities. Food, water, and energy are critical resources for the human society and have complicated cooperative/competitive influences on each other. The management of interactive resources is essential for supply chain analysis. This research analyzes the food-water-energy system of urban metabolism for sustainable resources management. A system dynamics model is established to investigate the urban metabolism of food, water, and energy resources. This study conducts a case study of Shihmen Reservoir system, hydropower generation, paddy rice irrigation of Taoyuan and Shihmen Irrigation Associations, and water consumption in Taoyuan, New Taipei, and Hsinchu cities. The interactive influence of the food-water-energy nexus is quantified in this study; the uncertainty analysis of food, water, and energy nexus is presented. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Comparative Analysis of the Spectral Response to Soil Salinity of Saline-Sodic Soils under Different Surface Conditions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2721; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122721
Received: 28 October 2018 / Revised: 20 November 2018 / Accepted: 27 November 2018 / Published: 3 December 2018
PDF Full-text (3328 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Desiccation cracking is a very common surface soil phenomenon of saline-sodic land. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of salt content on the spectral reflectance of soil with and without desiccation cracks. To achieve our objective, a cracking test [...] Read more.
Desiccation cracking is a very common surface soil phenomenon of saline-sodic land. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of salt content on the spectral reflectance of soil with and without desiccation cracks. To achieve our objective, a cracking test was performed using 17 soil samples. Following the tests, crack parameters were extracted, and correlation analysis was then performed between crack parameters and four soil properties: Na+, salinity (total concentration of ions), pH, and electric conductivity (EC). In order to select the optimum spectral measurement method and develop prediction models, spectral response to different soil properties were compared between the cracked soil samples and the comparative soil samples composed of the 2 mm particle size fraction processed by traditional methods. The results indicate that soil salinity dominated cracking propagation with a positive correlation. Since area and volume scattering are closer to what occurs in the field, a greater spectral response to soil properties was found for cracked soil samples relative to the comparative soil samples in the near-infrared and shortwave-infrared regions. The R2 of optimal linear prediction models based on the cracked soil samples were 0.74, 0.67, 0.58, and 0.67 for Na+, salinity, pH, and EC, respectively. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Urbanization, Land Use Behavior and Land Quality in Rural China: An Analysis Based on Pressure-Response-Impact Framework and SEM Approach
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2621; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15122621
Received: 7 September 2018 / Revised: 16 November 2018 / Accepted: 19 November 2018 / Published: 22 November 2018
PDF Full-text (1960 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
During the last 40 years, China has undergone rapid urbanization which has resulted in land degradation and a decrease in land. Cultivated land protection has thus become one of the most active and important aspects of land science. This study presents a pressure-response-impact [...] Read more.
During the last 40 years, China has undergone rapid urbanization which has resulted in land degradation and a decrease in land. Cultivated land protection has thus become one of the most active and important aspects of land science. This study presents a pressure-response-impact (PRI) framework which may reveal the inter-correlations among households’ land-use behavior and cultivated land quality change in the process of rapid urbanization in China. The structural equation model (SEM) has been applied using a household survey dataset collected in 2015 in Sujiatun district, Shenyang city, Liaoning province. The results show that: (1) there is a complex causal relationship between the latent variables urbanization, household land-use behavior and cultivated land quality (i.e., urbanization → land-use behavior → land quality), which supports our PRI conceptual framework; (2) the changes of external social-economic context stemming from urbanization are the major cause of land-use behavior variance; (3) land quality is mostly affected by farmers’ land-use behavior including land-use pattern, land-use degree and land-input intensity, in particular the growing of cash crops (GCC, associated with land use pattern) and capital input per unit of farmland (LII, associated with land input intensity). These findings are of some theoretical and practical significance. Theoretically, they add to the current literature by identifying the roles of sociological factors and farmers’ land-use behavior in the process of land quality protection using a PRI framework. Practically, measures should be taken to reasonably set the prices of agricultural products, promote the development of the land rental market and increase the comparative revenue of agricultural production, so as to stimulate incentives to farming and land quality protection. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Impact of Farmland Change on Soybean Production Potential in Recent 40 Years: A Case Study in Western Jilin, China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1522; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071522
Received: 13 June 2018 / Revised: 11 July 2018 / Accepted: 14 July 2018 / Published: 18 July 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (8268 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
During the last 40 years, the quantity and spatial patterns of farmland in Western Jilin have changed dramatically, which has had a great impact on soybean production potential. This study used one of the most advanced crop production potential models, the Global Agro-Ecological [...] Read more.
During the last 40 years, the quantity and spatial patterns of farmland in Western Jilin have changed dramatically, which has had a great impact on soybean production potential. This study used one of the most advanced crop production potential models, the Global Agro-Ecological Zones model, to calculate the soybean production potential in Western Jilin based on meteorological, topography, soil and land use data, and analyzed the impact of farmland change on soybean production potential during 1975–2013. The main conclusions were the following: first, the total soybean production potential in Western Jilin in 2013 was 8.92 million tonnes, and the average soybean production potential was 1612 kg/ha. The production potential of eastern area was higher than the other areas of Western Jilin. Second, farmland change led to a growth of 3.30 million tonnes in soybean production potential between 1975 and 2000, and a decrease of 1.03 million tonnes between 2000 and 2013. Third, taking account of two situations of farmland change, the conversion between dryland and other categories, and the change of irrigation percentage led to the total soybean production potential in Western Jilin increased by 2.31 and only 0.28 million tonnes respectively between 1975 and 2000, and increased by 0.12 and 0.29 million tonnes respectively between 2000 and 2013. In general, the increase of soybean potential production was mainly due to grassland and woodland reclamation. The results of this study would be a good guideline for protecting safe baseline of farmland, managing land resources, and ensuring continuity and stability of soybean supply and food security. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Distribution of Shrubland and Grassland Soil Erodibility on the Loess Plateau
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1193; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061193
Received: 1 May 2018 / Revised: 20 May 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 7 June 2018
PDF Full-text (2557 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Soil erosion is one of the most severe problems facing environments and has increased throughout the 20th century. Soil erodibility (K-factor) is one of the important indicators of land degradation, and many models have been used to estimate K values. Although [...] Read more.
Soil erosion is one of the most severe problems facing environments and has increased throughout the 20th century. Soil erodibility (K-factor) is one of the important indicators of land degradation, and many models have been used to estimate K values. Although soil erodibility has been estimated, the comparison of different models and their usage at a regional scale and, in particular, for different land use types, need more research. Four of the most widely distributed land use types were selected to analyze, including introduced and natural grassland, as well as introduced and natural shrubland. Soil particle size, soil organic matter and other relevant soil properties were measured to estimate soil erodibility in the Loess Plateau. The results show that: (1) the erosion productivity impact calculator (EPIC) model and SHIRAZI model are both suitable for the Loess Plateau, while the SHIRAZI model has the advantage of fewer parameters; (2) introduced grassland has better ability to protect both the 0–5 cm soils and 5–20 cm soils, while the differences between introduced and natural shrubland are not obvious at a catchment scale; (3) the K values of introduced grassland, natural grassland, introduced shrubland and natural shrubland in the 0–5 cm layer vary from 0.008 to 0.037, 0.031 to 0.046, 0.012 to 0.041 and 0.008 to 0.045 (t·hm2·h/(MJ·mm·hm2)), while the values vary from 0.009 to 0.039, 0.032 to 0.046, 0.012 to 0.042 and 0.008 to 0.048 (t·hm2·h/(MJ·mm·hm2)) in the 5–20 cm layer. The areas with a mean multiyear precipitation of 370–440 mm are the most important places for vegetation restoration construction management at a regional scale. A comprehensive balance between water conservation and soil conservation is needed and important when selecting the species used to vegetation restoration. This study provides suggestions for ecological restoration and provides a case study for the estimate of soil erodibility in arid and semiarid areas. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top