Special Issue "Global Burden of Disease: Diversity of Socioeconomic Consequences Worldwide"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mihajlo (Michael) Jakovljevic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Global Health Economics and Policy, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Kragujevac, Kragujevac, Serbia
2. Division of Health Economics, Lund University, Lund, Sweden
Interests: global health; Global Burden of Disease Project; big data; health care financing & expenditures; evaluation of policy; programs and health system performance; organisation of health care markets; health economics; emerging markets

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue entitled: “Global Burden of Disease: Diversity of Socioeconomic Consequences Worldwide” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph.

The Global Burden of Disease Project developed in 1990 from WHO-supported efforts (https://www.who.int/healthinfo/global_burden_disease/about/en/) to provide in-depth epidemiological evidence with scale and depth unseen before that time in the professional literature. The core idea behind this multinational effort was that methodologically rigorous evidence on unmet medical needs in diverse world regions would create a solid, long-lasting, and evolving ground for informed policy making (http://www.healthdata.org/infographic/what-global-burden-disease-gbd). So far, it has become a strong success story, bringing value-based policy-making and evidence-driven health policies to diverse regions worldwide (http://www.healthdata.org/gbd/about).

Since the dawn of the first out of four consecutive industrial revolutions beginning in 18th century Europe, global morbidity and mortality patterns have changed tremendously. This means that most contemporary nations experienced a transition from dominant infectious diseases, traumatism, and acute maternal and early childhood morbidity towards chronic non-communicable diseases. This profound change was driven to some extent by urbanization, changing lifestyle, and sexual revolution, but to a large degree was also due to the widespread phenomenon of population ageing.

All these transformations in population health are reflected heavily in the human societies across the globe. At first, the historical establishments of national health systems, regardless of their kind (Bismarck, Beveridge or Semashko), were all based on a demographic growth model. Consequently, a variety of nations—rich and poor alike—in the decades following WWII and the Cold War Era faced serious threats to the long-term financial sustainability of their health, social support, and pension systems.

In this sense, we are launching this Special Issue to address some of the core research questions related to mankind’s epidemiological evolution, such as:

  • The consequences of the spread of NCDs for national health systems;
  • Health expenditure long-term trends driven by these changes in OECD and leading emerging markets alike (BRICs, EM7);
  • Health policy and economic estimates in relation to global morbidity and mortality transition;
  • Evolving burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs);
  • Rapid transformation of pharmaceutical markets led by Asia, attributable to GBD transition;
  • Transnational assessments of underlying health trends and forecasts for the future;
  • Comparisons of geopolitical groupings of countries sharing similar legacies of health care provision and financing;

We welcome the submission of Reviews, Original Research Articles, Short Communications, Editorial Letters, Systematic Reviews, Case Studies, and other kinds of articles targeting any of these core research questions and beyond. We would be delighted to attract as high diversity and heterogeneity of submissions across geographies and jurisdictions as possible.

Prof. Dr. Mihajlo (Michael) Jakovljevic
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • global burden of disease
  • health economics
  • health policy
  • population ageing
  • noncommunicable diseases (NCDs)
  • health spending (expenditure)
  • pharmaceuticals
  • emerging markets
  • trends
  • forecasts

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Analysis of the Financing of Russian Health Care over the Past 100 Years
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1848; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101848 - 24 May 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The evolution of epidemiological burden in Imperial Russia and, consecutively, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), took place mostly over the duration of the past century [...] Full article
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Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
Burden of Disease in Coastal Areas of South Korea: An Assessment Using Health Insurance Claim Data
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3044; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173044 - 22 Aug 2019
Abstract
Background: While measuring and monitoring disease morbidity, it is essential to focus on regions experiencing inequitable health outcomes, especially coastal populations. However, no research investigating population health outcomes in coastal areas has been conducted. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the burden of disease [...] Read more.
Background: While measuring and monitoring disease morbidity, it is essential to focus on regions experiencing inequitable health outcomes, especially coastal populations. However, no research investigating population health outcomes in coastal areas has been conducted. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the burden of disease morbidity in coastal areas of South Korea. Methods: Using an administrative division map and the ArcGIS, we identified and included 496 coastal districts. In this observational study, years lived with disability (YLDs) were estimated using incidence-based approaches to calculate the burden of disease in 2015. Incidence and prevalence cases were collected using National Health Insurance Service (NHIS) medical claim data using a specialized algorithm. Results: Age-standardized years lived with disability (ASYLDs) in the coastal areas were 24,398 per 100,000 population, which is greater than the 22,613 YLDs observed nationwide. In coastal areas, the burden of disease morbidity was higher in females than in males. Diabetes mellitus was the leading specific disease of total YLDs per 100,000 population, followed by low back pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, osteoarthritis, and ischemic stroke. Conclusion: In this study, the coastal areas of South Korea carry a higher burden than the national population. Additionally, chronic diseases compose the majority of the health burden in coastal areas. Despite the limitation of data, YLD was the best tool available for evaluating the health outcomes in specific areas, and has the advantage of simplicity and timely analysis. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Underlying Differences in Health Spending Within the World Health Organisation Europe Region—Comparing EU15, EU Post-2004, CIS, EU Candidate, and CARINFONET Countries
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(17), 3043; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16173043 - 22 Aug 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This study examined the differences in health spending within the World Health Organization (WHO) Europe region by comparing the EU15, the EU post-2004, CIS, EU Candidate and CARINFONET countries. The WHO European Region (53 countries) has been divided into the following sub-groups: EU15, [...] Read more.
This study examined the differences in health spending within the World Health Organization (WHO) Europe region by comparing the EU15, the EU post-2004, CIS, EU Candidate and CARINFONET countries. The WHO European Region (53 countries) has been divided into the following sub-groups: EU15, EU post-2004, CIS, EU Candidate countries and CARINFONET countries. The study period, based on the availability of WHO Global Health expenditure data, was 1995 to 2014. EU15 countries have exhibited the strongest growth in total health spending both in nominal and purchasing power parity terms. The dynamics of CIS members’ private sector expenditure growth as a percentage of GDP change has exceeded that of other groups. Private sector expenditure on health as a percentage of total government expenditure, has steadily the highest percentage point share among CARINFONET countries. Furthermore, private households’ out-of-pocket payments on health as a percentage of total health expenditure, has been dominated by Central Asian republics for most of the period, although, for the period 2010 to 2014, the latter have tended to converge with those of CIS countries. Western EU15 nations have shown a serious growth of health expenditure far exceeding their pace of real economic growth in the long run. There is concerning growth of private health spending among the CIS and CARINFONET nations. It reflects growing citizen vulnerability in terms of questionable affordability of healthcare. Health care investment capability has grown most substantially in the Russian Federation, Turkey and Poland being the classical examples of emerging markets. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Geodemographic Area Classification and Association with Mortality: An Ecological Study of Small Areas of Cyprus
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(16), 2927; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16162927 - 15 Aug 2019
Abstract
Geographical investigations are a core function of public health monitoring, providing the foundation for resource allocation and policies for reducing health inequalities. The aim of this study was to develop geodemographic area classification based on several area-level indicators and to explore the extent [...] Read more.
Geographical investigations are a core function of public health monitoring, providing the foundation for resource allocation and policies for reducing health inequalities. The aim of this study was to develop geodemographic area classification based on several area-level indicators and to explore the extent of geographical inequalities in mortality. A series of 19 area-level socioeconomic indicators were used from the 2011 national population census. After normalization and standardization of the geographically smoothed indicators, the k-means cluster algorithm was implemented to classify communities into groups based on similar characteristics. The association between geodemographic area classification and the spatial distribution of mortality was estimated in Poisson log-linear spatial models. The k-means algorithm resulted in four distinct clusters of areas. The most characteristic distinction was between the ageing, socially isolated, and resource-scarce rural communities versus metropolitan areas with younger population, higher educational attainment, and professional occupations. By comparison to metropolitan areas, premature mortality appeared to be 44% (95% Credible Intervals [CrI] of Rate Ratio (RR): 1.06–1.91) higher in traditional rural areas and 36% (95% CrI of RR: 1.13–1.62) higher in young semi-rural areas. These findings warrant future epidemiological studies investigating various causes of the urban-rural differences in premature mortality and implementation policies to reduce the mortality gap between urban and rural areas. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
A Population Dynamic Model to Assess the Diabetes Screening and Reporting Programs and Project the Burden of Undiagnosed Diabetes in Thailand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(12), 2207; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16122207 - 21 Jun 2019
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is rising worldwide, exacerbated by aging populations. We estimated and predicted the diabetes burden and mortality due to undiagnosed diabetes together with screening program efficacy and reporting completeness in Thailand, in the context of demographic changes. An age and sex [...] Read more.
Diabetes mellitus (DM) is rising worldwide, exacerbated by aging populations. We estimated and predicted the diabetes burden and mortality due to undiagnosed diabetes together with screening program efficacy and reporting completeness in Thailand, in the context of demographic changes. An age and sex structured dynamic model including demographic and diagnostic processes was constructed. The model was validated using a Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. The prevalence of DM was predicted to increase from 6.5% (95% credible interval: 6.3–6.7%) in 2015 to 10.69% (10.4–11.0%) in 2035, with the largest increase (72%) among 60 years or older. Out of the total DM cases in 2015, the percentage of undiagnosed DM cases was 18.2% (17.4–18.9%), with males higher than females (p-value < 0.01). The highest group with undiagnosed DM was those aged less than 39 years old, 74.2% (73.7–74.7%). The mortality of undiagnosed DM was ten-fold greater than the mortality of those with diagnosed DM. The estimated coverage of diabetes positive screening programs was ten-fold greater for elderly compared to young. The positive screening rate among females was estimated to be significantly higher than those in males. Of the diagnoses, 87.4% (87.0–87.8%) were reported. Targeting screening programs and good reporting systems will be essential to reduce the burden of disease. Full article
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