Special Issue "Mental Health and Well-Being in Adolescence: Environment and Behavior"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Mental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Javier Ortuño Sierra
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Developmental and Educational Sciences, University of La Rioja, Spain
Interests: adolescence; mental health; well-being; development; psychometrics; epigenetics; neurocognitive

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Well-being and mental health in adolescence is a crucial aspect today. Adolescence is considered a crucial developmental stage with different transformations that affect at physical, psychological, and sociological levels. It is well known that mental disorders and psychological difficulties in adulthood start in a considerable percentage during adolescence. The impact of these difficulties affects not only the person but also the family, the school, and the whole community and environment surrounding the adolescent. Bearing in mind the high prevalence and the long-term negative consequences associated with mental health difficulties during adolescence, more attention and resources from public health systems are now being devoted to the evaluation, detection, and intervention of psychological difficulties and related phenomena. Moreover, and with the aim of further understanding those individuals at risk for psychological difficulties, the study of protective and risk factors, for instance, neurocognitive performance, is recommended. Further, identifying specific neurocognitive factors in high-risk youth may optimize the prognostic accuracy and the prediction strategies of clinical outcomes. Nonetheless, little is still known about well-being in adolescence and its relationships with psychological difficulties as well as neurocognitive aspects. In addition, the comprehension of these relevant factors in a crucial stage as adolescence is may help with implementing strategies for prevention before the transition to mental health issues and chronic disorders.

This Special Issue seeks research papers on various aspects of mental health development in adolescence. We especially encourage the submission of interdisciplinary work and multicountry collaborative research. We also encourage the submission of health systems and health policy-related manuscripts that focus on issues related to mental health in adolescence in the environment and the neurocognitive aspect related to it. We welcome original research papers using different study designs as well as systematic reviews and meta-analyses.

Dr. Javier Ortuño Sierra
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mental health
  • Adolescence
  • Youth
  • Neurocognitive performance
  • Well-Being
  • Protective factors
  • Emotional and behavioral difficulties

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Online Learning Communities and Mental Health Literacy for Preschool Teachers: The Moderating Role of Enthusiasm for Engagement
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4448; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224448 - 13 Nov 2019
Abstract
Background: Most of the existing literature analyzes preschool teachers’ perceptions of information seeking and measures their satisfaction with online support for mental health issues. Seldom has this literature considered the influence of enthusiasm for or preference towards online engagement and social media [...] Read more.
Background: Most of the existing literature analyzes preschool teachers’ perceptions of information seeking and measures their satisfaction with online support for mental health issues. Seldom has this literature considered the influence of enthusiasm for or preference towards online engagement and social media in the development of preschool teachers’ mental health literacy. Methods: This study focused on preschool teachers’ attitudes towards the impact of an online learning community on mental health literacy and explored the moderation of enthusiasm for engagement on this relationship. A survey was conducted in Taiwan, and the researchers employed partial least squares to test the moderating effect. Results: The results indicate that enthusiasm for engagement has a negative moderating effect on the relationship between an online learning community and mental health literacy for preschool teachers. Conclusions: The moderating effect of enthusiasm for engagement in this relationship reminds us to consider the advantages and disadvantages of the employment of online learning communities for the improvement of mental health literacy and well-being. This study recommends cautiously integrating online learning communities and real-world communication into an appropriate and user-friendly interactive model to help preschool teachers promote their mental health literacy and well-being. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Well-Being in Adolescence: Environment and Behavior)
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Open AccessArticle
Assessing the Impact of School-Based Greenness on Mental Health Among Adolescent Students in Ontario, Canada
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(22), 4364; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16224364 - 08 Nov 2019
Abstract
Neighbourhood greenness has been frequently associated with improved mental health in adulthood, yet its impact among youth is less clear. Additionally, though youth spend large portions of time at school, no study has investigated associations between school-based measures of greenness and students’ mental [...] Read more.
Neighbourhood greenness has been frequently associated with improved mental health in adulthood, yet its impact among youth is less clear. Additionally, though youth spend large portions of time at school, no study has investigated associations between school-based measures of greenness and students’ mental health in Canada. We addressed this gap by linking participant responses from the 2016–2017 Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey to school-based features of the built environment. Our analyses included 6313 students, ages 11–20. Measures of greenness were the mean and max of the annual mean Normalized Difference Vegetation Index within 500 m and 1000 m from the centroid of the school postal code. Measures of mental health included: serious psychological distress (Kessler 6-item Psychological Distress Scale), self-rated mental health (using a five-point Likert scale), suicide ideation, and suicide attempt. In our study population, the prevalence of serious psychological distress and low self-rated mental health was 16.7% and 20.3%, respectively. Suicide ideation was reported by 13.5% of participants, while 3.7% reported a suicide attempt. Quantity of greenness was similar between schools in the lower and upper quartiles. In logistic regressions, we found no association between objective school-based greenness and mental health, as assessed by multiple measures, both before and after adjustment. Null findings held true after stratification by season, as well. Whether other characteristics of school greenness (such as type, quality, or access and use) are more impactful to students’ mental health should be a focus of future analyses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Well-Being in Adolescence: Environment and Behavior)
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Open AccessArticle
Post-Traumatic Stress and School Adaptation in Adolescent Survivors Five Years after the 2010 Yushu Earthquake in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4167; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214167 - 29 Oct 2019
Abstract
(1) Background: The devastating Ms 7.1 earthquake struck Yushu city, China, in 2010, leading to serious consequences and damage in the central Tibetan Plateau. This study aimed to assess school adaptation and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms of adolescent survivors five years after [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The devastating Ms 7.1 earthquake struck Yushu city, China, in 2010, leading to serious consequences and damage in the central Tibetan Plateau. This study aimed to assess school adaptation and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms of adolescent survivors five years after the Yushu earthquake. (2) Methods: A large-scale, school-based mental health survey was conducted 5 years after the earthquake among Tibetan students in the city of Yushu using the Adolescent’s School Adaptation Scale (ASAS) and the PTSD Checklist. (3) Results: A total of 1976 questionnaires were collected. A total of 30.7% of Tibetan adolescents had poor school adaptation and 19.5% were estimated as having probable PTSD. Logistic regression showed that females (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.60–0.89), senior students (OR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.39–0.59), and those who participated in post-disaster reconstruction (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.54–0.85) were less likely to have poor school adaptation, while a positive association was observed among those buried under a collapsed building (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.04–2.09) and those who experienced bereavement (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.27–2.45). Students who had experienced bereavement were also more likely to have PTSD (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.12–2.28). (4) Conclusions: The post-traumatic effects of the Yushu earthquake on Tibetan adolescents were severe and long-lasting. Sustainable long-term mental health services to help adolescents to restructure their mental health are necessary. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Well-Being in Adolescence: Environment and Behavior)
Open AccessArticle
Gender Difference in the Effect of Short Sleep Time on Suicide among Korean Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(18), 3285; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16183285 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
A close association between the duration of sleep and suicide has been reported in previous studies. This study was designed to investigate whether there is a difference in the effects of sleep duration on suicide by gender. This study was conducted based on [...] Read more.
A close association between the duration of sleep and suicide has been reported in previous studies. This study was designed to investigate whether there is a difference in the effects of sleep duration on suicide by gender. This study was conducted based on the results of a volunteer online survey for adolescents in middle and high school in the Republic of Korea. The results showed that the effect of a depressive mood on short sleep time and on suicide was not different between male and female adolescents. It has been reported that the direct effect of short sleep time on increasing suicidal ideation is 2.50 times higher in female than in male adolescents. Differences in the metabolism of sex hormones and sleep-associated neurotransmitters might have affected this result, but further studies are needed to clarify more obvious mechanisms. In addition, this result should be considered when establishing sleep education for adolescents. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Well-Being in Adolescence: Environment and Behavior)
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