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Open AccessArticle

Post-Traumatic Stress and School Adaptation in Adolescent Survivors Five Years after the 2010 Yushu Earthquake in China

1
Department of Public Health, Medical College, Qinghai University, Qinghai 810001, China
2
Department of Statistics, University of California, Riverside, 337 Olmsted Hall, UCR, Riverside, CA 92521, USA
3
Team IETO, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, UMR U1219, INSERM, Université de Bordeaux, 33076 Bordeaux, France
4
School of Public Administration, Inner Mongolia University, Inner Mongolia 010021, China
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(21), 4167; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16214167
Received: 20 September 2019 / Revised: 22 October 2019 / Accepted: 27 October 2019 / Published: 29 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Well-Being in Adolescence: Environment and Behavior)
(1) Background: The devastating Ms 7.1 earthquake struck Yushu city, China, in 2010, leading to serious consequences and damage in the central Tibetan Plateau. This study aimed to assess school adaptation and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms of adolescent survivors five years after the Yushu earthquake. (2) Methods: A large-scale, school-based mental health survey was conducted 5 years after the earthquake among Tibetan students in the city of Yushu using the Adolescent’s School Adaptation Scale (ASAS) and the PTSD Checklist. (3) Results: A total of 1976 questionnaires were collected. A total of 30.7% of Tibetan adolescents had poor school adaptation and 19.5% were estimated as having probable PTSD. Logistic regression showed that females (OR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.60–0.89), senior students (OR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.39–0.59), and those who participated in post-disaster reconstruction (OR = 0.68, 95% CI: 0.54–0.85) were less likely to have poor school adaptation, while a positive association was observed among those buried under a collapsed building (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.04–2.09) and those who experienced bereavement (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.27–2.45). Students who had experienced bereavement were also more likely to have PTSD (OR = 1.60, 95% CI: 1.12–2.28). (4) Conclusions: The post-traumatic effects of the Yushu earthquake on Tibetan adolescents were severe and long-lasting. Sustainable long-term mental health services to help adolescents to restructure their mental health are necessary. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescent; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); school adaptation; Tibetan; Yushu earthquake adolescent; post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); school adaptation; Tibetan; Yushu earthquake
MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, S.; Lu, L.; Bai, Z.-Z.; Su, M.; Qi, Z.-Q.; Zhang, S.-Y.; Chen, Y.; Ao, B.-Y.; Cui, F.-Z.; Lagarde, E.; Lii, K. Post-Traumatic Stress and School Adaptation in Adolescent Survivors Five Years after the 2010 Yushu Earthquake in China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4167.

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