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Open AccessArticle

Sociocultural Influences, Drive for Thinness, Drive for Muscularity, and Body Dissatisfaction among Korean Undergraduates

by 1 and 2,*
1
College of Education, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Seoul 130-791, Korea
2
Department of Sports Sciences, Seoul National University of Science & Technology, Seoul 01811, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5260; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145260
Received: 25 June 2020 / Revised: 16 July 2020 / Accepted: 16 July 2020 / Published: 21 July 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mental Health and Well-Being in Adolescence: Environment and Behavior)
For many years, body dissatisfaction was considered a western phenomenon, and was studied mostly in Caucasian women. Recent studies, however, suggest that these issues are also present in men and in other ethnic groups. This research investigated the differential effects of various sociocultural pressures transmitted from the media, one’s parents, and one’s peers on the drives for thinness and muscularity, and body dissatisfaction among 1125 Korean college students (56% male) using structural equation modeling. The results indicate that, after controlling for body mass index and exercise, media pressures exerted the largest effects on participants’ body ideals and, in turn, body dissatisfaction across both genders (β = 0.44, and 0.30, p < 0.05, for females and males, respectively). This study’s results also indicate that there are considerable gender differences in this relationship. Specifically, the results show that parental and media pressure had significant indirect relationships with body dissatisfaction via the drive for thinness among females, while peer and media pressures had significant indirect relationships with body dissatisfaction via the drive for muscularity among males. As body dissatisfaction is known to significantly affect an individual’s mental and physical health, future research needs to identify relevant influential factors in this area, as well as the paths they have leading to increased body dissatisfaction. View Full-Text
Keywords: sociocultural influences; drive for thinness; drive for muscularity; body dissatisfaction; exercise sociocultural influences; drive for thinness; drive for muscularity; body dissatisfaction; exercise
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MDPI and ACS Style

You, S.; Shin, K. Sociocultural Influences, Drive for Thinness, Drive for Muscularity, and Body Dissatisfaction among Korean Undergraduates. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17, 5260. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145260

AMA Style

You S, Shin K. Sociocultural Influences, Drive for Thinness, Drive for Muscularity, and Body Dissatisfaction among Korean Undergraduates. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2020; 17(14):5260. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145260

Chicago/Turabian Style

You, Sukkyung; Shin, Kyulee. 2020. "Sociocultural Influences, Drive for Thinness, Drive for Muscularity, and Body Dissatisfaction among Korean Undergraduates" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 17, no. 14: 5260. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145260

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