Special Issue "Review in Environment and Applied Ecology"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Science and Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Elena Cristina Rada
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Leading Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Maria Cristina Collivignarelli
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering and Architecture, University of Pavia, 27100 Pavia, Italy
Interests: advanced biological wastewater treatments; treatments for sludge minimization; innovative management of wastewater and drinking water treatment plants; membrane processes; advanced oxidation processes; resource recovery; circular economy and interdisciplinary approaches
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will publish a thematic series of high-quality review articles on key topics in Environment and Applied Ecology. It will present historical and contemporary reviews to emphasize new opportunities for Environment and Applied Ecology, to translate research into recommendations for best practices in the real Environment and to promote discussion in the Environment and Applied Ecology. Reviews may concern bibliometric and content analysis methods, international and national research progress on ecological thresholds, eco-efficiency analysis as well as challenges and opportunities of the interaction between Environment and Applied Ecology. The methodology for assessing the ecological interaction of complex socio-technical systems at all stages of their life cycle with the environment can be the starting point for important review papers in this Special Issue. Principles of ecologically balanced and socially oriented development of mineral resources could also be considered. Economic implications, health impact and legislative aspects are important topics that may also be considered in the proposed papers. For a wider vision of the topics of this Special Issue please refer to the keywords list.

Prof. Maria Cristina Collivignarelli
Prof. Dr. Elena Cristina Rada
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • community, ecosystem and global ecology
  • biometrics, theoretical and quantitative ecology
  • applied microbiology, biotechnology and public health microbiology
  • aquatic resources, biomonitoring
  • water scarcity, water quality and water/wastewater management
  • multidisciplinary agricultural and environmental research (including waste and energy generation)
  • sustainable and organic agriculture, natural resource management
  • clean energy and sustainability
  • environmental protection, environmental management and sustainability
  • environmental analysis and measurements
  • health, environment and economy
  • ecological methodology, monitoring and modeling
  • biodiversity and ecosystem research
  • ecological economics, natural capital and ecosystem services
  • climatology, meteorology, climate-ecology, climate change and environment
  • public acceptance of environmental technologies
  • complex socio-technical systems
  • system life cycle stages

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Radon Gas in the City of Alicante. High Risk of Low Indoor Air Quality in Poorly Ventilated Buildings
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8762; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238762 - 25 Nov 2020
Abstract
In December 2019, Spain considered for the first time the presence of radon to the Technical Building Code (Basic Document HS 6: Radon Exposure Protection), although it only mentions minimum presences and the need for ventilation. This research shows that in buried structures [...] Read more.
In December 2019, Spain considered for the first time the presence of radon to the Technical Building Code (Basic Document HS 6: Radon Exposure Protection), although it only mentions minimum presences and the need for ventilation. This research shows that in buried structures or in places with little ventilation, even in soils with a low probability of granite, a high content of radon gas can be found. The city of Alicante has been used as a measurement location for different architectural sites; here, the level of 100 Bq/m3 is the first threshold where the gas must be monitored, and the level of 300 Bq/m3 is the maximum threshold above which corrective ventilation measures must be taken. The research conducted during the years 2015 and 2016 shows that it is necessary to account for also the areas considered to be “low presence of radon gas” to achieve healthy constructions. The renewal of air in the different places will be tested for the presence of radon, i.e., the greater the accumulation is, the less ventilation and the greater the risk of accumulation of radon gas. This study is located in the city of Alicante, where the seven civil constructions are located: two Civil War shelters, the Santa Barbara Castle, the Ereta Powder Keg, the Luceros-Marq and Serra Grossa railway tunnels and the Británica underground deposits. Radon gas is currently a concern for major health and medical agencies because it is considered to be a chemical element that is very harmful to people. The World Health Organization is one of the organisations that has the objective of studying and researching this element, to develop solutions. Radon gas is normally found in a gaseous state and is highly radioactive. It is present in many terrains and it is mostly found in those with granite; although the presence of this element is very low, there is always a minimum presence. In the past, in nongranite soils, the dose of radon was considered to be so low that it was insignificant. Therefore, in this research, the aim is to consider the high presence of radon gas in nongranite soils as long as the conditions for its accumulation are present. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review in Environment and Applied Ecology)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Disinfection of Wastewater by UV-Based Treatment for Reuse in a Circular Economy Perspective. Where Are We at?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010077 - 24 Dec 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Among the critical issues that prevent the reuse of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) effluents in a circular economy perspective, the microbiological component plays a key role causing infections and diseases. To date, the use of conventional chemical oxidants (e.g., chlorine) represent the main [...] Read more.
Among the critical issues that prevent the reuse of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) effluents in a circular economy perspective, the microbiological component plays a key role causing infections and diseases. To date, the use of conventional chemical oxidants (e.g., chlorine) represent the main applied process for wastewater (WW) disinfection following a series of operational advantages. However, toxicity linked to the production of highly dangerous disinfection by-products (DBPs) has been widely demonstrated. Therefore, in recent years, there is an increasing attention to implement sustainable processes, which can simultaneously guarantee the microbiological quality of the WWs treated and the protection of both humans and the environment. This review focuses on treatments based on ultraviolet radiation (UV) alone or in combination with other processes (sonophotolysis, photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis with both natural and artificial light) without the dosage of chemical oxidants. The strengths of these technologies and the most significant critical issues are reported. To date, the use of synthetic waters in laboratory tests despite real waters, the capital and operative costs and the limited, or absent, experience of full-scale plant management (especially for UV-based combined processes) represent the main limits to their application on a larger scale. Although further in-depth studies are required to ensure full applicability of UV-based combined processes in WWTPs for reuse of their purified effluents, excellent prospects are presented thanks to an absent environmental impact in terms of DBPs formation and excellent disinfection yields of microorganisms (in most cases higher than 3-log reduction). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review in Environment and Applied Ecology)
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Open AccessReview
Popularization of Carbon Capture and Storage Technology in Society: Principles and Methods
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(22), 8368; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17228368 - 12 Nov 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The problem of global warming is a key challenge. One means to prevent climate change is to reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This can be achieved using CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technology. Due to the relative novelty [...] Read more.
The problem of global warming is a key challenge. One means to prevent climate change is to reduce the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This can be achieved using CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technology. Due to the relative novelty of the technology, low level of experience, and high risk of implementation, in practice society often displays a negative attitude towards CCS projects. Thus, it is necessary to develop a targeted strategy to popularize CO2 capture and storage technology. Based on an extensive literature review and the experience of implementation of CCS projects in different countries, this study demonstrates the necessity of applying the deficit, contextual, lay expertise, and public participation models to promote CCS technology. As a result, the factors influencing the choice of promotion tools are identified, and the measures to popularize CCS technology, depending on the stage of its implementation, are determined. Recommendations for the improvement of CCS public databases are developed. The methodologies used this study include case studies, system-oriented analysis, and stakeholder management tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Review in Environment and Applied Ecology)
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