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Special Issue "Rehabilitation and Physical Activity at Home in Subacute and Chronic Stroke"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2022 | Viewed by 1281

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stéphane Mandigout
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Limoges, 87000 Limoges, France
Interests: physical activity; exercise; aging; ecological activity; activity sensor; energy cost when walking; technological innovation; cardiovascular physiology; fatigue
Dr. Charles Sebiyo Batcho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Rehabilitation, Laval University, 1050, Avenue de la Médecine, Quebec, QC G1V0A6, Canada
Interests: cost-effective rehabilitation interventions; physical activity; active leisure; rehabilitation technologies; autonomy and social participation; psychometric properties; outcome measure development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stroke is the leading cause of acquired neurological disability and a major public health concern. Post stroke rehabilitation is essential for limiting the risk of recurrence, reducing impairments and allowing the patient to maintain a good level of autonomy. For several years, we have yielded reliable results demonstrating the beneficial effects of a post-stroke care program (sub-acute or chronic). However, following a stroke, not all patients benefit from in-patient rehabilitation. Moreover, the duration of this program, usually undergone before discharge, as well as post discharge care, varies greatly depending on the country. In this Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH), we would like to highlight the studies that explore home care. We  welcome manuscripts from different disciplines, including rehabilitation medicine, epidemiology, intervention studies, risk and health impact assessment. New research papers, reviews, case reports and brief papers that address any of the aforementioned topics are welcomed in this Special Issue, particularly those that combine a high academic standard with a practical approach to provide optimal solutions for home- or community-based stroke rehabilitation.

Dr. Stéphane Mandigout
Dr. Charles Sebiyo Batcho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • stroke
  • rehabilitation
  • home
  • epidemiology
  • health technology, health and well-being
  • acceptability
  • efficacity
  • physical activity
  • risk assessment
  • environment and care
  • health behavior

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Elastic Dynamic Sling on Subluxation of Hemiplegic Shoulder in Patients with Subacute Stroke: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(16), 9975; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19169975 (registering DOI) - 12 Aug 2022
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Abstract
Background: Shoulder subluxation occurs in 17–64% of hemiplegic patients after stroke and develops mostly during the first three weeks of hemiplegia. A range of shoulder orthoses has been used in rehabilitation to prevent subluxation. However, there is little evidence of their efficacy. AIM: [...] Read more.
Background: Shoulder subluxation occurs in 17–64% of hemiplegic patients after stroke and develops mostly during the first three weeks of hemiplegia. A range of shoulder orthoses has been used in rehabilitation to prevent subluxation. However, there is little evidence of their efficacy. AIM: This study aimed to investigate whether there is a difference in the subluxation distance, pain, and functional level of the hemiplegic upper extremity among patients with two different shoulder orthoses. Design: This is a prospective, randomized controlled trial with intention-to-treat analysis. SETTING: Multicenter, rehabilitation medicine department of two university hospitals in South Korea. Population: Forty-one patients with subacute stroke with shoulder subluxation with greater than 0.5 finger width within 4 weeks of stroke were recruited between January 2016 and October 2021. Methods: The experimental group used an elastic dynamic sling while sitting and standing to support the affected arm for eight weeks. The control group used a Bobath sling while sitting and standing. The primary outcome was to assess the distance of the shoulder subluxation on radiography. The secondary outcomes were upper-extremity function, muscle power, activities of daily living, pain and spasticity. Result: The horizontal distance showed significant improvement in the elastic dynamic sling group, but there were no significant differences in the vertical distance between the elastic dynamic and Bobath sling groups. Both groups showed improvements in upper-extremity movements and independence in daily living after 4 and 8 weeks of using shoulder orthoses, and the differences within the groups were significant (p < 0.05). However, there were no significant differences in upper-extremity movements and independence in daily living between the two groups. Conclusions: The subluxation distance showed better results in the elastic dynamic sling, which has both proximal and distal parts, than in the Bobath sling, which holds only the proximal part. Both shoulder orthoses showed improvements in the modified Barthel index, upper-extremity function, and manual muscle testing. Full article

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Case Report
A 6-Month Home-Based Functional Electrical Stimulation Program for Foot Drop in a Post-Stroke Patient: Considerations on a Time Course Analysis of Walking Performance
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9204; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159204 - 27 Jul 2022
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Abstract
Foot drop is a common disability in post-stroke patients and represents a challenge for the clinician. To date, ankle foot orthosis (AFO) combined with conventional rehabilitation is the gold standard of rehabilitation management. AFO has a palliative mechanical action without actively restoring the [...] Read more.
Foot drop is a common disability in post-stroke patients and represents a challenge for the clinician. To date, ankle foot orthosis (AFO) combined with conventional rehabilitation is the gold standard of rehabilitation management. AFO has a palliative mechanical action without actively restoring the associated neural function. Functional electrical stimulation (FES), consisting of stimulation of the peroneal nerve pathway, represents an alternative approach. By providing an FES device (Bioness L-300, BIONESS, Valencia, CA, USA) for 6 months to a post-stroke 22-year-old woman with a foot drop, our goal was to quantify its potential benefit on walking capacity. The gait parameters and the temporal evolution of the speed were collected with a specific connected sole device (Feet Me®) during the 10-m walking, the time up and go, and the 6-minute walking tests with AFO, FES, or without any device (NO). As a result, the walking speed changes on 10-m were clinically significant with an increase from the baseline to 6 months in AFO (+0.14 m.s−1), FES (+0.36 m.s−1) and NO (+0.32 m.s−1) conditions. In addition, the speed decreased at about 4-min in the 6-minute walking test in NO and AFO conditions, while the speed increased in the FES conditions at baseline and after 1, 3, and 6 months. In addition to the walking performance improvement, monitoring the gait speed in an endurance test after an ecological rehabilitation training program helps to examine the walking performance in post-stroke patients and to propose a specific rehabilitation program. Full article
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Systematic Review
Measured and Perceived Effects of Upper Limb Home-Based Exergaming Interventions on Activity after Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(15), 9112; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19159112 - 26 Jul 2022
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Abstract
After discharge from the hospital to home, stroke patients may experience weakness and reduced movement in their hemiparetic arms that limits their ability to perform daily activities. Therapists can use exercise games (exergames) to maintain functional abilities and daily use of the arm [...] Read more.
After discharge from the hospital to home, stroke patients may experience weakness and reduced movement in their hemiparetic arms that limits their ability to perform daily activities. Therapists can use exercise games (exergames) to maintain functional abilities and daily use of the arm at home. A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to determine the efficiency of upper limb home-based rehabilitation, using exergaming on activity abilities in stroke. Randomized controlled trials were reviewed in the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, and SCOPUS online databases. Clinical measures of observation and self-reporting were studied in post-intervention and follow-up. Nine studies were included in this systematic review (535 participants). The Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) score was 6.6/10 (SD 1.0, range 5–8), indicating good quality. This systematic review and meta-analysis showed that upper limb home-based exergaming interventions were no more effective in terms of activity than conventional therapy after stroke, according to the observational and subjective assessments in post-intervention and follow-up. Using this same approach, future studies should focus on evaluating home-based exergames through subgroup analysis to be able to propose recommendations. Full article
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