Special Issue "Occupational Health Psychology"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Nicholas J. Beutell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Management, Business Administration & Health Care Management, LaPenta School of Business, Iona College, New Rochelle, NY, USA
Interests: wellbeing; self-rated health; mental health; work-family interaction; ageing; retirement; small business; entrepreneurship
Prof. Xinyuan (Roy) Zhao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Business School, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China
Interests: work-family conflict; family friendly organization culture; flexible employment; job crafting

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The fact that an individual’s boss has a greater impact on their health than their primary care physician is revealing. The psychological and health consequences of work permeate all levels of society, from individual employees, teams, families, communities, to entire countries. The pervasive influence of work and occupational engagement on adjustment, adaptation, health symptoms, family life, economic productivity, and wellbeing is more widely recognized and appreciated as new research emerges. This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health seeks to extend research in the exciting domain of occupational health psychology.

Organizations are changing in this volatile and uncertain world. So is the nature of work, the relationship between work and other life areas, and the consequences for worker and organizational psychological health. The erosion of top–down organizational structures that emerged from the Industrial Revolution has created new opportunities and threats. New forms of work such as job crafting, the impact of technology, automation, and emergence of the ‘robotic’ workforce have created new horizons but also valid concerns for employees regarding job security and economic wellbeing. The impact of such changes on occupational health psychology requires additional investigation.

Contributions from a variety of theoretical perspectives on occupational health psychology are encouraged, including empirical research, review articles, and studies of health-related interventions in organizations. This Special Issue takes a broad look at the field, including but not limited to job-related stress and burnout, health consequences of job loss, abusive supervision, economic and financial insecurity, substance abuse, bullying, job demands and resources, health impairment and promotion processes, and demographic factors (gender, aging workforce, immigrants, generational groups).

In addition, other areas of interest include job satisfaction, life satisfaction, happiness, wellbeing, thriving, withdrawal behaviors (absenteeism, turnover intentions), coping behavior, commuting time, performance and productivity, workplace violence and terrorism, work-family conflict and synergy, depression, mental health, and self-rated health.

Prof. Nicholas J. Beutell
Prof. Xinyuan (Roy) Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • health psychology
  • stress and burnout
  • job loss
  • health impairment
  • health promotion
  • mental health
  • wellbeing
  • job demands/resources
  • work-family interaction
  • self-rated health

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Workplace Violence in Asian Emergency Medical Services: A Pilot Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3936; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203936 (registering DOI) - 16 Oct 2019
Abstract
Workplace violence among Asian emergency medical services (EMS) has rarely been examined. A cross-sectional, mainly descriptive study using a standardized, paper-based, self-reported questionnaire survey was conducted between August and October 2018 among emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in the Tainan City Fire Bureau, Taiwan. [...] Read more.
Workplace violence among Asian emergency medical services (EMS) has rarely been examined. A cross-sectional, mainly descriptive study using a standardized, paper-based, self-reported questionnaire survey was conducted between August and October 2018 among emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in the Tainan City Fire Bureau, Taiwan. A total of 152 EMT-paramedics responded to the questionnaire survey, constituting an overall response rate of 96.2%. The participants were predominantly male (96.1%), college-educated (4-year bachelor’s degree) (49.3%), and middle-aged (35–44 years old) (63.8%). Among them, 113 (74.3%) and 75 (49.3%) participants had experienced verbal and physical assaults at work, respectively. Only 12 (7.9%) participants were familiar with relevant regulations or codes. The assaults predominantly occurred during evening shifts (16:00–24:00) and at the scene of the emergency. The most predominant violence perpetrators included patients, patients’ families, or patients’ friends. Nearly 10% of participants had experienced verbal assaults from hospital personnel. EMTs who encountered workplace violence rarely completed a paper report, filed for a lawsuit, or sought a psychiatric consultation. Fifty-eight (38.2%) and 16 (10.5%) participants were victims of frequent (at least once every 3 months) verbal and physical forms of violence, respectively; however, no statistically significant association was observed in terms of EMT gender, age, working years, education level, or the number of EMS deployments per month. The prevalence of workplace violence among Asian EMS is considerable and is comparable to that in Western countries. Strategies to prevent workplace violence should be tailored to local practice and effectively implemented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health Psychology)
Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Social Communication on Life Satisfaction among the Rural Elderly: A Moderated Mediation Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(20), 3791; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16203791 - 09 Oct 2019
Abstract
Life satisfaction of the rural elderly has increasingly become an important issue for society. Based on the social support theory and Cha Xu Ge Ju (pattern of difference sequence), this study investigates the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions that explain the relationship between [...] Read more.
Life satisfaction of the rural elderly has increasingly become an important issue for society. Based on the social support theory and Cha Xu Ge Ju (pattern of difference sequence), this study investigates the underlying mechanisms and boundary conditions that explain the relationship between social communication and life satisfaction among the rural elderly. Specifically, it explores the mediating role of psychological well-being in the relationship between social communication and life satisfaction. In addition, it examines whether emotional support moderates the effect of social communication on psychological well-being. Data from 658 rural elderly in China were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results show that psychological well-being mediates the relationship between social communication and life satisfaction. Additionally, the relationship between social communication on psychological well-being was negatively moderated by emotional support. Finally, implications for management theory and practice are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health Psychology)
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Open AccessArticle
Contextual Factors Associated with Burnout among Chinese Primary Care Providers: A Multilevel Analysis
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(19), 3555; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16193555 - 23 Sep 2019
Abstract
Burnout is a common and growing phenomenon in the health care setting. The objective of the present study is to examine contextual factors in the workplace associated with burnout among primary care providers (PCPs) in Shandong Province, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted [...] Read more.
Burnout is a common and growing phenomenon in the health care setting. The objective of the present study is to examine contextual factors in the workplace associated with burnout among primary care providers (PCPs) in Shandong Province, China. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 951 PCPs nested within 48 primary health institutions (PHIs). Burnout was measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory–Human Services Survey (MBI–HSS). We used two-level random intercept linear regression models to examine individual- versus workplace-level risk factors for burnout. The result revealed that 33.12%, 8.83% and 41.43% PCPs were experiencing a high degree of emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP) and low personal accomplishment (PA). In multilevel analysis, the most significant and common individual-level predictors of burnout were lack of perceived work support and autonomy. At the institutional level, workload was positively related to EE (odds ratio (OR): 6.59; 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.46–9.72), while work support was related to higher PA (OR: 3.49; 95% CI: 0.81–6.17). Greater attention should be paid to the influence of the work environment factors (workload and work support) to prevent burnout. Strategies such as increasing human resources allocated to PHIs and establishing a supportive work environment are encouraged to prevent and reduce burnout among PCPs in China. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Health Psychology)
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