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Special Issue "Climate Change, Health, and Equity"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2022 | Viewed by 3418

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Qingxiang Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Atmospheric Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Zhuhai 519082, China
Interests: climate data; climate change; urban climate
Dr. Steve Hung Lam Yim
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Asian School of the Environment, College of Secience, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Interests: air pollution; long-range transport of air pollutants (transboundary air pollution); ozone; fine particulate matter; regional climate change; human health impact assessment; radiative climate forcing
Prof. Dr. Yonghong Li
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute of Environmental Health, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100021, China
Interests: climate change; health risk assessment; health adaptation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Global warming directly affects the earth's ecosystem, bringing harm to the human living environment and human health. Worse still, extreme and abnormal weather phenomena brought about by global climate change, such as heatwaves, droughts, floods, freezes, hailstorms, sand and dust storms, etc., cause serious natural disasters, which are enough to cause serious blows to human society. Therefore, it is urgent to slow down global warming, to vigorously carry out research on the relationship between climate change and human health, and to establish a sound monitoring and early warning system for diseases affecting public health.

This Special Issue is open to the subject area of climate change and public health. The keywords listed below provide an outline of some of the possible areas of interest.

Prof. Dr. Qingxiang Li
Dr. Steve Hung Lam Yim
Prof. Dr. Yonghong Li
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • extreme weather events
  • climate change
  • urban climate
  • air pollution
  • ozone formation and removal particulate matter transport
  • health impact assessment
  • disease prevention and control
  • infectious disease processes and predictive modeling
  • interaction effects of climate and air pollution
  • other intersections studies

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Article
Global Warming’s Six MTurks: A Secondary Analysis of a US-Based Online Crowdsourcing Market
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(14), 8320; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19148320 - 07 Jul 2022
Viewed by 299
Abstract
Using a global warming audience segmentation tool (Six Americas Super Short Survey (SASSY)) as a case study, we consider how public health can use consumer panels and online crowdsourcing markets (OCMs) in research. Through a secondary analysis, we aim to understand how consumer [...] Read more.
Using a global warming audience segmentation tool (Six Americas Super Short Survey (SASSY)) as a case study, we consider how public health can use consumer panels and online crowdsourcing markets (OCMs) in research. Through a secondary analysis, we aim to understand how consumer panels and OCMs are similar to or different from each other on demographics and global warming beliefs through SASSY, and how they compare to US Census estimates. With this information, researchers will understand public opinion of global warming in their sample, which is useful for many climate change initiatives. Neither the consumer panel (Ipsos) or OCM sample (MTurk) matched US estimates of population demographics. Both panels achieved similar SASSY segments, showing that even with diverse sampling frames, SASSY is a useful tool for understanding global warming sentiment. Compared to Ipsos, MTurk was younger (more Millennials and Generation X), had higher educational attainment, and lower income. Both panels were majority White, but Ipsos was more diverse than the unweighted MTurk. Ipsos had more respondents from the South whereas MTurk had more respondents from the West. Across the MTurk SASSY segment, there were no significant differences for the majority of demographic characteristics except for age; younger generations were more Alarmed or Concerned, and older generations were more Doubtful and Dismissive. Researchers interested in understanding their sample’s opinions of global warming should use SASSY and consider oversampling in key demographic variables if they intend to achieve a nationally representative and diverse sample. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Health, and Equity)
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Article
Intercomparison of Local Warming Trends of Shanghai and Hong Kong Based on 120-Year Temperature Observational Data
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6494; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116494 - 26 May 2022
Viewed by 384
Abstract
Using surface air temperature observations from 1901 to 2020, this study compared the warming trends of Shanghai and Hong Kong over a period of 120 years. The statistical results reveal the following: (1) The average temperatures of the two cities underwent fluctuating increases [...] Read more.
Using surface air temperature observations from 1901 to 2020, this study compared the warming trends of Shanghai and Hong Kong over a period of 120 years. The statistical results reveal the following: (1) The average temperatures of the two cities underwent fluctuating increases during the past 120 years, with linear warming rates of 0.23 °C/decade in Shanghai and 0.13 °C/decade in Hong Kong. (2) The fluctuation ranges of maximum temperature in the two cities were considerably higher than those of mean temperature. Moreover, in both cities, the annual mean maximum temperature decreased during a phase of more than a decade. The fluctuation ranges of minimum temperature were smaller, whereas the linear increases were higher than those for the mean temperature. (3) The diurnal temperature ranges (DTRs) of the two cities decreased; a certain phase of the decreases in DTR in the two cities was caused by decreases in the maximum temperature. (4) At a certain stage of urban development, owing to the shading effect of new high-rise buildings, the solar shortwave radiation reaching the Earth’s surface decreased, and anthropogenic heat generated by the energy consumption of buildings and urban human activities at that time was not sufficient to make up for the reduced shortwave radiation. This result may have led to the declines in the maximum temperature experienced by both cities. (5) Currently, the number of hot days and extremely hot days in the two cities has increased significantly compared with that a century ago, indicating that climate warming has an adverse impact on human settlements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Health, and Equity)
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Article
Modeling and Preliminary Analysis of the Impact of Meteorological Conditions on the COVID-19 Epidemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(10), 6125; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19106125 - 18 May 2022
Viewed by 404
Abstract
Since the COVID-19 epidemic outbreak at the end of 2019, many studies regarding the impact of meteorological factors on the attack have been carried out, and inconsistent conclusions have been reached, indicating the issue’s complexity. To more accurately identify the effects and patterns [...] Read more.
Since the COVID-19 epidemic outbreak at the end of 2019, many studies regarding the impact of meteorological factors on the attack have been carried out, and inconsistent conclusions have been reached, indicating the issue’s complexity. To more accurately identify the effects and patterns of meteorological factors on the epidemic, we used a combination of logistic regression (LgR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR) modeling to investigate the possible effects of common meteorological factors, including air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, and surface pressure, on the transmission of the COVID-19 epidemic. Our analysis shows that: (1) Different countries and regions show spatial heterogeneity in the number of diagnosed patients of the epidemic, but this can be roughly classified into three types: “continuous growth”, “staged shock”, and “finished”; (2) Air temperature is the most significant meteorological factor influencing the transmission of the COVID-19 epidemic. Except for a few areas, regional air temperature changes and the transmission of the epidemic show a significant positive correlation, i.e., an increase in air temperature is conducive to the spread of the epidemic; (3) In different countries and regions studied, wind speed, relative humidity, and surface pressure show inconsistent correlation (and significance) with the number of diagnosed cases but show some regularity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Health, and Equity)
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Article
Impacts of Extreme Climate Events on Future Rice Yields in Global Major Rice-Producing Regions
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4437; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084437 - 07 Apr 2022
Viewed by 534
Abstract
Under the dual impacts of climate change and COVID-19, there are great risks to the world’s food security. Rice is one of the three major food crops of the world. Assessing the impact of climate change on future rice production is very important [...] Read more.
Under the dual impacts of climate change and COVID-19, there are great risks to the world’s food security. Rice is one of the three major food crops of the world. Assessing the impact of climate change on future rice production is very important for ensuring global food security. This article divides the world’s main rice-producing regions into four regions and uses a multivariate nonlinear model based on historical economic and climatic data to explore the impacts of historical extreme climatic events and economic factors on rice yield. Based on these historical models, future climatic data, and economic data under different shared socioeconomic pathways (SSPs), the yields of four major rice-producing regions of the world under different climate change scenarios (SSP126, SSP245, and SSP585) are predicted. The research results reveal that under different climate change scenarios, extreme high-temperature events (Tx90p) and extreme precipitation events (Rx5day, R99pTOT) in the four major rice-producing regions have an upward trend in the future. Extreme low-temperature events (Tn10p) have a downward trend. In the rice-producing regions of Southeast Asia and South America, extreme precipitation events will increase significantly in the future. The prediction results of this model indicate that the rice output of these four major rice-producing regions will show an upward trend in the future. Although extreme precipitation events will have a negative impact on rice production, future increases in rice planting areas, economic development, and population growth will all contribute to an increase in rice production. The increase in food demand caused by population growth also brings uncertainty to global food security. This research is helpful for further understanding climate change trends and risks to global rice-production areas in the future and provides an important reference for global rice-production planning and risk management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Health, and Equity)
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Article
Can a Greenhouse Gas Emissions Tax on Food also Be Healthy and Equitable? A Systemised Review and Modelling Study from Aotearoa New Zealand
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(8), 4421; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19084421 - 07 Apr 2022
Viewed by 653
Abstract
Policies to mitigate climate change are essential. The objective of this paper was to estimate the impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) food taxes and assess whether such a tax could also have health benefits in Aotearoa NZ. We undertook a systemised review on [...] Read more.
Policies to mitigate climate change are essential. The objective of this paper was to estimate the impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) food taxes and assess whether such a tax could also have health benefits in Aotearoa NZ. We undertook a systemised review on GHG food taxes to inform four tax scenarios, including one combined with a subsidy. These scenarios were modelled to estimate lifetime impacts on quality-adjusted health years (QALY), health inequities by ethnicity, GHG emissions, health system costs and food costs to the individual. Twenty-eight modelling studies on food tax policies were identified. Taxes resulted in decreased consumption of the targeted foods (e.g., −15.4% in beef/ruminant consumption, N = 12 studies) and an average decrease of 8.3% in GHG emissions (N = 19 studies). The “GHG weighted tax on all foods” scenario had the largest health gains and costs savings (455,800 QALYs and NZD 8.8 billion), followed by the tax—fruit and vegetable subsidy scenario (410,400 QALYs and NZD 6.4 billion). All scenarios were associated with reduced GHG emissions and higher age standardised per capita QALYs for Māori. Applying taxes that target foods with high GHG emissions has the potential to be effective for reducing GHG emissions and to result in co-benefits for population health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Health, and Equity)
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Article
Urbanization Effects on Surface Wind in the Guangdong–Hong Kong–Macao Greater Bay Area Using a Fan-Sector Method
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3194; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063194 - 08 Mar 2022
Viewed by 546
Abstract
Surface wind directly affects human life, wind energy utilization, the atmospheric environment, and many other aspects. The Guangdong–Hong Kong–Macau Greater Bay Area (GBA) megalopolis is experiencing an accelerated progress of urbanization, which may result in the change in surface roughness and atmospheric characteristics. [...] Read more.
Surface wind directly affects human life, wind energy utilization, the atmospheric environment, and many other aspects. The Guangdong–Hong Kong–Macau Greater Bay Area (GBA) megalopolis is experiencing an accelerated progress of urbanization, which may result in the change in surface roughness and atmospheric characteristics. In this study, urbanization effects on surface wind speed (SWS) in the GBA megalopolis, particularly Zhuhai, is investigated by using long-term automatic meteorological measurements, ERA5 reanalysis, and nighttime light data. Results of the analysis show that the averaged SWS has decreased significantly at a rate of −0.53 m s−1 per decade over the past decades. With the help of observation-minus-reanalysis (OMR) method, which excludes the atmospheric circulation effects, we found that the decrease in SWS is mainly contributed by the increase in surface roughness, which may account for as much as 75.5% of the decrease. In other words, it is the rapid development of urbanization, rather than the change in large-scale circulation, that could be mainly responsible for the decrease over the GBA in the context of the increasing global SWS since 2010. In addition, a fan-sector method is established to quantitatively analyze the correspondences between urbanization and roughness changes. It is shown that the decrease in wind speed due to surface roughness change is significantly related to the increase in the nighttime light index (NLI) averaged over the 3 km upstream fan-sectors. Moreover, their correlation reaches to 0.36 (negative) when only accounting for the samples of NLI greater than 10. In general, the fan-sector method offers an additional option for assessing the urbanization effects on SWS. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change, Health, and Equity)
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