Special Issue "Toward Healthy Aging and Age-Friendly Communities: Advances in Methods, and Challenge for Implementation Research"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Aging".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Seungwon Jeong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Community Welfare, Faculty of Health Sciences, Niimi University, Okayama 718-0017, Japan
Interests: age-friendly cities; health disparity; healthy aging; public health; community welfare; medical and welfare management
Prof. Dr. Katsunori Kondo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Social Preventive Medical Sciences, Center for Preventive Medical Sciences, Chiba University, Chiba 260-0856, Japan
2. Department of Gerontological Evaluation, Center for Gerontology and Social Science, National Center for Geriatrics and Gerontology, Aichi 474-8511, Japan
Interests: longevity science; policy science; social epidemiology; health services research
Prof. Dr. Toshiyuki Ojima
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Community Health and Preventive Medicine, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Shizuoka 431-3192, Japan
Interests: age-friendly cities; dementia; epidemiology; health policy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world’s population is aging faster, which will undoubtedly impact all aspects of society. At present, the world is trying to improve the social environment to reduce health disparities, a risk factor of healthy aging. The WHO advocates for “Age-Friendly Cities” as a tool for the diagnosis and evaluation of the social environment and, in the last decade, has proposed eight interconnected domains of life (Community and Health Care, Transportation, Housing, Social Participation, Outdoor Spaces and Buildings, Respect and Social Inclusion, Civic Participation and Employment, Communication, and Information). In 2020, it proposed the “Decade of Healthy Aging”, which requires collaborative action among governments, civil society, international interventions, professionals, academia, the media, and the private sector.

We invite you to submit to this Special Issue an original research paper or review article that addresses one or more of the abovementioned topics and can help to improve the lives of older people, their families, their communities, and, hence, the world.

Dr. Seungwon Jeong
Prof. Dr. Katsunori Kondo
Prof. Dr. Toshiyuki Ojima
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • healthy aging
  • age-friendly community
  • community and health care
  • health inequalities
  • social environment
  • health behavior change
  • implementation research

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Psychometric Properties of the Meaning of Home and Housing-Related Control Beliefs Scales among 67–70 Year-Olds in Sweden
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4273; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084273 - 17 Apr 2021
Viewed by 307
Abstract
Background: The housing environment is important for health and well-being among older people, and it is important to consider both physical and perceived aspects of housing. Psychometrically sound scales are necessary to assess perceived housing. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of two [...] Read more.
Background: The housing environment is important for health and well-being among older people, and it is important to consider both physical and perceived aspects of housing. Psychometrically sound scales are necessary to assess perceived housing. This study evaluated the psychometric properties of two instruments that measure perceived aspects of housing among a younger cohort of older adults in Sweden. Methods: A random sample of 371 participants aged 67 to 70 years (mean 67.9 (SD = 0.98)) was used. Participants lived in ordinary housing in the south of Sweden. Data on perceived aspects of housing were collected with the Meaning of Home Questionnaire (MOH) and the Housing-Related Control Beliefs Questionnaire (HCQ). Internal consistency, corrected item–total correlations, floor and ceiling effects, and construct validity were analyzed. Results: Cronbach’s alphas for all four subscales of MOH and two of three subscales of HCQ had acceptable levels (α > 0.50). Some items from both scales had low item–total correlations. All subscales, except for one from HCQ, had good construct validity. Conclusion: While both instruments had some limitations, all subscales with one exception had adequate psychometric properties. When used in different national contexts, further development may be necessary to achieve conceptual equivalence. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Depressive Symptoms and Its Influencing Factors among the Elderly in Urban and Rural Areas: Evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS)
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 3886; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18083886 - 07 Apr 2021
Viewed by 355
Abstract
Depression amongst the elderly population is a worldwide public health problem, especially in China. Affected by the urban–rural dual structure, depressive symptoms of the elderly in urban and rural areas are significantly different. In order to compare depressive symptoms and its influencing factors [...] Read more.
Depression amongst the elderly population is a worldwide public health problem, especially in China. Affected by the urban–rural dual structure, depressive symptoms of the elderly in urban and rural areas are significantly different. In order to compare depressive symptoms and its influencing factors among the elderly in urban and rural areas, we used the data from the fourth wave of the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS). A total of 7690 participants at age 60 or older were included in this study. The results showed that there was a significant difference in the prevalence estimate of depression between urban and rural elderly (χ2 = 10.9.76, p < 0.001). The prevalence of depression among rural elderly was significantly higher than that of urban elderly (OR-unadjusted = 1.88, 95% CI: 1.67 to 2.12). After adjusting for gender, age, marital status, education level, minorities, religious belief, self-reported health, duration of sleep, life satisfaction, chronic disease, social activities and having income or not, the prevalence of depression in rural elderly is 1.52 times (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.32 to 1.76) than that of urban elderly. Gender, education level, self-reported health, duration of sleep, chronic diseases were associated with depression in both urban and rural areas. In addition, social activities were connected with depression in urban areas, while minorities, marital status and having income or not were influencing factors of depression among the rural elderly. The interaction analysis showed that the interaction between marital status, social activities and urban and rural sources was statistically significant (divorced: coefficient was 1.567, p < 0.05; social activities: coefficient was 0.340, p < 0.05), while gender, education level, minorities, self-reported health, duration of sleep, life satisfaction, chronic disease, social activities having income or not and urban and rural sources have no interaction (p > 0.05). Thus, it is necessary to propose targeted and precise intervention strategies to prevent depression after accurately identifying the factors’ effects. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
How to Improve the Public Trust of the Intelligent Aging Community: An Empirical Study Based on the ACSI Model
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 1971; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18041971 - 18 Feb 2021
Viewed by 427
Abstract
In order to enhance social trust in intelligent aging services, the formation mechanism of public trust in the intelligent aging community was studied. Based on the classic American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) model, this paper establishes the public trust formation model of the [...] Read more.
In order to enhance social trust in intelligent aging services, the formation mechanism of public trust in the intelligent aging community was studied. Based on the classic American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) model, this paper establishes the public trust formation model of the intelligent aging community by proposing relevant assumptions. Using 306 questionnaires from China’s intelligent aging care model community as the original data, the model is empirically tested through structural equation modeling. The empirical results show that: firstly, the public satisfaction with the intelligent aging community directly determines the formation of public trust, and the key to improving public trust in the intelligent aging community is to improve customer satisfaction. Secondly, perceived quality, perceived ease of use, perceived risk, and perceived cost economical directly affect public satisfaction and indirectly affect the formation process of public trust in the intelligent aging community. Public satisfaction serves as a complete intermediary in this process. Full article
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