ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Second Edition: Effects of Plant-Based Diets on Human Health and the Environment

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Environmental Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 4049

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A large body of scientific literature has shown that adherence to plant-based dietary patterns is correlated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.

Plant-based diets are dietary patterns that include high consumption of plant-based foods such as vegetables, whole grains, fruits, legumes, seeds, and nuts and strongly reduce the consumption of most animal products. Meat and dairy products are fueling the climate crisis, while plant-based diets help protect the environment.

The different types of plant-based diets are:

  • Mediterranean;
  • Flexitarian;
  • Vegetarian and vegan;
  • Whole food plant-based.

This Special Issue of IJERPH will evaluate possible correlations between health and plant-based diets. The Special Issue will also study the effects of plant-based diets on the intake of certain nutrients (e.g., iron, zinc, PUFA, vitamin D) and their correlation with metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. 

Best regards,
Dr. Mauro Lombardo
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • diet
  • plant-based
  • environment
  • Mediterranean
  • flexitarian
  • vegetarian
  • obesity
  • vegan
  • cancer
  • diabetes
  • health
  • PUFA
  • iron
  • zinc

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Review

34 pages, 1403 KiB  
Review
Promising Sources of Plant-Derived Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids: A Narrative Review
by Gianluca Rizzo, Luciana Baroni and Mauro Lombardo
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(3), 1683; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20031683 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3785
Abstract
(1) Background: Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are known for their ability to protect against numerous metabolic disorders. The consumption of oily fish is the main source of PUFAs in human nutrition and is commonly used for supplement production. However, seafood is an overexploited [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are known for their ability to protect against numerous metabolic disorders. The consumption of oily fish is the main source of PUFAs in human nutrition and is commonly used for supplement production. However, seafood is an overexploited source that cannot be guaranteed to cover the global demands. Furthermore, it is not consumed by everyone for ecological, economic, ethical, geographical and taste reasons. The growing demand for natural dietary sources of PUFAs suggests that current nutritional sources are insufficient to meet global needs, and less and less will be. Therefore, it is crucial to find sustainable sources that are acceptable to all, meeting the world population’s needs. (2) Scope: This review aims to evaluate the recent evidence about alternative plant sources of essential fatty acids, focusing on long-chain omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs. (3) Method: A structured search was performed on the PubMed search engine to select available human data from interventional studies using omega-3 fatty acids of non-animal origin. (4) Results: Several promising sources have emerged from the literature, such as algae, microorganisms, plants rich in stearidonic acid and GM plants. However, the costs, acceptance and adequate formulation deserve further investigation. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop