Special Issue "Repetitive DNA Sequences"

A special issue of Genes (ISSN 2073-4425). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Genetics and Genomics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 January 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Andrew G. Clark

Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Drosophila; genetic variation; natural populations; quantitative modeling of phenotypes; genomics;
Guest Editor
Prof. Daniel A. Barbash

Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: heterochromatic DNA; non-coding regulatory DNA; Drosophila; transposable elements; satellite DNA
Guest Editor
Dr. Sarah E. Lower

Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: repetitive DNA evolution; Drosophila; Fireflies; satellite DNA; genome sequencing;
Guest Editor
Dr. Anne-Marie Dion-Côté

Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, USA and Department of Ecology and Genetics Evolutionsbiologiskt Centrum, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Website | E-Mail
Interests: satellite DNA; genomics; mutation; transcriptomics; epigenetics; next generation sequencing;

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Repetitive DNAs are ubiquitous in eukaryotic genomes, and, in many species, comprise the bulk of the genome. Repeats include transposable elements that can self-mobilize and disperse around the genome and tandemly-repeated satellite DNAs that increase in copy number due to replication slippage and unequal crossing over. Despite their abundance, repetitive DNAs are often ignored in genomic studies, due to technical challenges in identifying, assembling and quantifying them. New technologies and methods are now allowing unprecedented power to analyze repetitive DNAs across diverse taxa. Repetitive DNAs are of particular interest because they can represent distinct modes of genome evolution. Some repetitive DNAs form essential genome structures, such as telomeres and centromeres, that are required for proper chromosome maintenance and segregation, while others form piRNA clusters that regulate transposable elements; thus, these elements are expected to evolve under purifying selection. In contrast, other repeats evolve selfishly and cause genetic conflicts with their host species that drive adaptive evolution of host defense systems. However, the majority of repeats likely accumulate in eukaryotes in the absence of selection due to mechanisms of transposition and unequal crossing over. Yet even these “neutral” repeats may indirectly influence genome evolution as they reach high abundance. In this Special Issue, the contributing authors explore these questions from a range of perspectives.

Prof. Andrew G. Clark
Prof. Daniel A. Barbash
Dr. Sarah E. Lower
Dr. Anne-Marie Dion-Côté
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • repetitive DNA
  • transposable element
  • heterochromatin
  • genome evolution
  • genomic conflict

Published Papers

This special issue is now open for submission.
Back to Top