Researching Families: The Challenges of Evidence, Documentation, and Methodology in Family History and Genealogical Studies

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778). This special issue belongs to the section "Family History".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2024) | Viewed by 8083

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of History, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX 78539-2999, USA
Interests: family history; family narrative; social history; migration and immigration; genealogy studies; Chesapeake history; the U.S. South
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Genealogy will focus on the theme as captured in the title, “Researching Families: The Challenges of Evidence, Documentation, and Methodology in Family History and Genealogical Studies”. It will examine the ways in which different types of evidence have been used to approach family history and genealogy. Articles are welcome from any time period or geographical region.

In recent years, technological innovation, particularly the introduction of the field of genetic genealogy, has brought about important changes in the methods used for genealogical research. Moreover, the digitization of many types of documents used in traditional research has opened many new paths for documenting relationships as well as examining the qualitative meanings of those relationships and how they have changed over time.

Articles are particularly welcome which focus on innovative uses of documentary evidence and/or DNA analysis to research family history and genealogy. This can include documenting family relationships as well examining historiographical issues, such as how the concept of childhood has developed and changed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, or how contemporary thought about gender has shaped the roles of parents in different cultures and historical settings. Case studies are particularly welcome, as are articles that look at new sets of evidence, such as digitization of record collections or the creation of research databases and indices. Thematically, articles may cover any time period, geographical region, or culture, although articles that deal with documenting the identities and roles of women and people of color are encouraged.

We request that prior to submitting a manuscript, interested authors initially submit a proposed title and an abstract of 400–600 words summarizing their intended contribution. Please send this to the Guest Editor, Dr. Thomas Daniel Knight ([email protected]) or the Genealogy Editorial Office ([email protected]). Abstracts will be reviewed by the Guest Editors for the purposes of ensuring proper fit within the scope of the Special Issue. Full manuscripts will undergo double-blind peer review.

Dr. Thomas Daniel Knight
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • genealogy
  • family history
  • methodology
  • evidence
  • research

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

10 pages, 1720 KiB  
Article
King Béla III of the Árpád Dynasty and Byzantium—Genealogical Approach
by Klára Berzeviczy and Gyula Pályi
Genealogy 2022, 6(4), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6040093 - 15 Dec 2022
Viewed by 2199
Abstract
Béla III from the Árpád dynasty, who later became the King of Hungary and Croatia, was previously the heir to the Byzantine Imperial Throne. Some genealogical aspects of this unusual individual are collected in the present study. Possible archaeogenetic relevance is also discussed. [...] Read more.
Béla III from the Árpád dynasty, who later became the King of Hungary and Croatia, was previously the heir to the Byzantine Imperial Throne. Some genealogical aspects of this unusual individual are collected in the present study. Possible archaeogenetic relevance is also discussed. Full article
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32 pages, 2241 KiB  
Article
Documenting Difficult Cases: A Mixed Method Analysis
by Thomas Daniel Knight
Genealogy 2022, 6(3), 69; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy6030069 - 12 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2361
Abstract
This Special Issue of Genealogy examines the use of evidence, documentation, and methodology in family history and genealogical studies, and welcomes case studies that examine how to document individuals and relationships. A critical component of scholarly research focusing on the study of particular [...] Read more.
This Special Issue of Genealogy examines the use of evidence, documentation, and methodology in family history and genealogical studies, and welcomes case studies that examine how to document individuals and relationships. A critical component of scholarly research focusing on the study of particular individuals or groups entails correctly identifying those individuals Historians, genealogists, historical demographers, and scholars in other disciplines sometimes undertake this sort of analysis. Often, research is uncomplicated if the research subject remained in a particular geographical area, or left a clear evidentiary trail, but what happens when historical documents do not clearly identify the research subject? Utilizing a case study approach, this essay employs four different research methods—the chronological study, family reconstitution, community study techniques, and the one-name study—to identify an individual whose correct historical identification was problematic. As such, it establishes a research strategy that can be employed in similar situations. Full article
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19 pages, 1674 KiB  
Article
Female Connectors in Social Networks: Catharine Minnich (Died 1843, Pennsylvania)
by Stephen B. Hatton
Genealogy 2021, 5(4), 104; https://doi.org/10.3390/genealogy5040104 - 7 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2397
Abstract
The thesis of the article is that taking a social network approach to genealogical problems of origin and parentage can, where applicable, result in two noteworthy benefits. The first benefit is that it may more quickly and effectively lead to matrilateral kin by [...] Read more.
The thesis of the article is that taking a social network approach to genealogical problems of origin and parentage can, where applicable, result in two noteworthy benefits. The first benefit is that it may more quickly and effectively lead to matrilateral kin by helping to reconstruct a kinship network. The second benefit is that it will lead to a deeper understanding of social circles in which a husband and/or wife participate. This approach turns the usual genealogical practice of unravelling a female’s position in a cluster in relation to her husband on its head—the male’s position in a social network is reconstructed by backtracking one of his significant females (wife, mother, or sister). As background, the article briefly discusses networks, the importance of women as connectors in kinship networks, and cultural practices of kinship, in this case, eighteenth-century Germany/United States. It then presents a case study of Catharine Minnich, a Pennsylvania woman of German descent. In addition to analyzing relations by blood and marriage, it recognizes the important role of baptismal sponsors in aligning a multi-family network. Full article
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