Special Issue "Genealogy and Immigration"

A special issue of Genealogy (ISSN 2313-5778).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Thomas Daniel Knight

Department of History, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Edinburg, TX 78539-2999 , USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: family history; family narrative; social history; migration and immigration; genealogy studies; Chesapeake history; the U.S. South

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue of Genealogy invites essays on the topic, “Genealogy and Immigration”. The goal of the issue is to examine the relationship between genealogy and immigration. Highlighting the connections between and among genealogy, immigration, migration, and family history is at the forefront of this issue. Contributors are asked to explain how and/or where genealogy and immigration intersect and the impact these connections might have upon the development of families over time. The editorial team hopes to provide a wide spectrum with regard to discipline or sub-discipline and invites contributions that strengthen and broaden the framework for genealogy studies. Some potential areas of focus may include the following, although all submissions are welcome and encouraged:

  • How immigration has changed the social and economic development of families over time;
  • How immigration has shaped, and continues to shape, family narratives, genealogical research, and the recording and preservation of family history;
  • How immigration has altered gender roles within families over time;
  • How immigration has contributed to the creation of fictive kinship systems and the redefinition of family roles and responsibilities;
  • How immigration has diversified the individual and collective past as new population groups have interacted, intermingled, and intermarried;
  • How immigration has created transnational families;
  • How immigration has led to new national and ethnic configurations and shaped family self-identification over time.

Throughout time, immigration has been fundamental to the human experience; this issue welcomes contributions that capture the complexity of that experience as they relate to genealogy, family history, and family narratives. Authors are encouraged to think broadly concerning the intersections of immigration and genealogy. Interdisciplinary contributions are especially encouraged (including, but not limited to, those incorporating methodologies from the disciplines of history, anthropology, literary studies, media studies, communication, psychology, and sociology) as well as those which are geographically diverse in subject matter, including transoceanic immigration (i.e., colonialism, 19th century immigration booms), immigration in borderlands regions (i.e., US/Mexico, England/Scotland, France/Germany, etc.) , immigration associated with short-term labor exchange (i.e., the bracero program, postwar immigration from India, Pakistan and the West Indies, immigration and migration following the creation of the European Union), forced immigration (i.e., slavery), the refugee experience (i.e., genealogies of Jewish refugees as well as refugees from Asia, Africa, the former USSR, and elsewhere), and immigration associated with conflict and warfare (i.e., the Norman Conquest, the Crusades, the French and Indian War, the Napoleonic wars, the first and second world war).  

Dr. Thomas Daniel Knight
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Genealogy is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Genealogy
  • immigration
  • migration
  • family history
  • kinship
  • gender
  • indentity
  • family narratives

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Italian Mothers and Italian-Canadian Daughters: Using Language to Negotiate the Politics of Gender
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 30 April 2019 / Accepted: 5 May 2019 / Published: 9 May 2019
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Abstract
This paper examines how migration redefines family narratives and dynamics. Through a parallel between the mother and the mother tongue, I unravel the emotional, linguistic, social, and ideological connotations of the mother–daughter relationship, which I define as a ‘condensed narrative about origin and [...] Read more.
This paper examines how migration redefines family narratives and dynamics. Through a parallel between the mother and the mother tongue, I unravel the emotional, linguistic, social, and ideological connotations of the mother–daughter relationship, which I define as a ‘condensed narrative about origin and identity’. This definition refers to the fact that the daughter’s biological, affective, linguistic, and socio-cultural identity grounds in the mother. The mother–daughter tie also has a gendered dimension, which opens up interesting gateways into the female condition. Taking this assumption as a starting point, I examine how migration, impacting on the mother–daughter relationship, can redefine gender roles and challenge models of femininity, which are culturally, socially, geographically, and linguistically embedded. I investigate this aspect from a linguistic perspective, through a reading of a corpus of narratives written by four Italian-Canadian writers. The movement from Italy to Canada enacts ‘the emergence of alternative family romances’ and draws new routes to femininity. This paper seeks to illustrate how, in the narratives I examine, these new routes are explored through linguistic means. The authors in my corpus use code-switching to highlight contrasting views of femininity and reposition themselves with respect to politics of gender. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genealogy and Immigration)
Open AccessArticle
Immigration, Identity, and Genealogy: A Case Study
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 15 December 2018 / Accepted: 18 December 2018 / Published: 2 January 2019
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Abstract
This paper examines the life and experiences of a 19th-century immigrant from the British Isles to the United States and his family. It examines his reasons for immigrating, as well as his experiences after arrival. In this case, the immigrant chose to create [...] Read more.
This paper examines the life and experiences of a 19th-century immigrant from the British Isles to the United States and his family. It examines his reasons for immigrating, as well as his experiences after arrival. In this case, the immigrant chose to create a new identity for himself after immigration. Doing so both severed his ties with his birth family and left his American progeny without a clear sense of identity and heritage. The essay uses a variety of sources, including oral history and folklore, to investigate the immigrant’s origins and examine how this uncertainty shaped the family’s history in the 19th and 20th centuries. New methodologies centering on DNA analysis have recently offered insights into the family’s past. The essay ends by positing a birth identity for the family’s immigrant ancestor. Importantly, the family’s post-immigration experiences reveal that the immigrant and his descendants made a deliberate effort to retain aspects of their pre-immigration past across both time and distance. These actions underscore a growing body of literature on the limits of post-immigration assimilation by immigrants and their families, and indicate the value of genealogical study for analyzing the immigrant experience. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genealogy and Immigration)

Other

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Open AccessProject Report
The Immigrant Ancestors Project: Gathering and Indexing 900,000 Names
Received: 12 October 2018 / Revised: 12 November 2018 / Accepted: 15 November 2018 / Published: 24 November 2018
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Abstract
The Immigrant Ancestors Project (IAP) is sponsored by the Center for Family History and Genealogy at Brigham Young University, which is located in Provo, Utah, United States. For eighteen years, students have served summer internships in Europe to acquire images of emigration records, [...] Read more.
The Immigrant Ancestors Project (IAP) is sponsored by the Center for Family History and Genealogy at Brigham Young University, which is located in Provo, Utah, United States. For eighteen years, students have served summer internships in Europe to acquire images of emigration records, focusing on those containing information about the emigrant’s hometown. In a mentored-learning environment, hundreds of students have worked on this index to help people all over the world discover their ancestors’ hometowns. The IAP database currently contains over 900,000 names, and it is available to the public free of charge. This paper discusses the history of IAP, as well as the benefits to those who use this significant online index. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Genealogy and Immigration)
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