Special Issue "Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering"

A special issue of Gels (ISSN 2310-2861).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2017)

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Esmaiel Jabbari

Biomimetic Materials and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208, USA
Website | E-Mail
Fax: +1 703 777 8265
Interests: bioinspired gels; gels for stem cell delivery; self-assembled micelles for growth factor immobilization; models gels to control cell microenvironment; composite materials with structure at multiple length scales; skeletal tissue engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Hydrogels form the foundation of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine as a supportive matrix for cell immobilization and growth factor delivery. Hydrogels, due to their wide range of properties, have been used as injectable, in situ gelling, patterned matrices, viscous gels, thin sheets, and three-dimensional scaffolds in regenerative medicine to guide and regulate cell fate. It has been widely established that the fate of implanted cells is mediated by cell–matrix and matrix–morphogen interactions at nano-, micro-, and macro-scales. Further, the fate of multi-cellular implants is dependent on in situ, timed-release of growth factors to guide the differentiation and maturation of cells to different lineages. As a result, recently there has been great interest in hydrogels with a hierarchical structure that mimic the complex interaction of cells with their microenvironment at multiple length scales, and hydrogels that can locally release growth factors to specific cells at different time scales. Related topics include: hydrogels with a hierarchical structure; self-assembled hydrogels; hybrid and degradable hydrogels; load-bearing and self-healing hydrogels; hydrogels for cell encapsulation and biofabrication; hydrogels for micro-patterning, microfluidic devices, and high-throughput screening; injectable and in situ hardening hydrogels for minimally-invasive applications; hydrogels that modulate the body’s immune response; and hydrogel-based delivery systems for spatiotemporal delivery of growth factors.

Prof. Dr. Esmaiel Jabbari
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Hydrogels with a hierarchical structure
  • Self-assembled hydrogels
  • Hybrid and degradable hydrogels
  • Load-bearing and self-healing hydrogels
  • Hydrogels for cell encapsulation and biofabrication
  • Hydrogels for micro-patterning, microfluidic devices
  • High-throughput screening, injectable
  • In situ hardening hydrogels for minimally-invasive applications
  • Hydrogels that modulate the body’s immune response
  • Hydrogel-based delivery systems for spatiotemporal delivery of growth factors

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (10 papers)

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Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Open AccessEditorial Hydrogels for Cell Delivery
Received: 15 June 2018 / Revised: 19 June 2018 / Accepted: 29 June 2018 / Published: 2 July 2018
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(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Open AccessArticle Physical Properties of the Extracellular Matrix of Decellularized Porcine Liver
Received: 7 March 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 26 April 2018 / Published: 1 May 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (6051 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The decellularization of organs has attracted attention as a new functional methodology for regenerative medicine based on tissue engineering. In previous work we developed an L-ECM (Extracellular Matrix) as a substrate-solubilized decellularized liver and demonstrated its effectiveness as a substrate for culturing and [...] Read more.
The decellularization of organs has attracted attention as a new functional methodology for regenerative medicine based on tissue engineering. In previous work we developed an L-ECM (Extracellular Matrix) as a substrate-solubilized decellularized liver and demonstrated its effectiveness as a substrate for culturing and transplantation. Importantly, the physical properties of the substrate constitute important factors that control cell behavior. In this study, we aimed to quantify the physical properties of L-ECM and L-ECM gels. L-ECM was prepared as a liver-specific matrix substrate from solubilized decellularized porcine liver. In comparison to type I collagen, L-ECM yielded a lower elasticity and exhibited an abrupt decrease in its elastic modulus at 37 °C. Its elastic modulus increased at increased temperatures, and the storage elastic modulus value never fell below the loss modulus value. An increase in the gel concentration of L-ECM resulted in a decrease in the biodegradation rate and in an increase in mechanical strength. The reported properties of L-ECM gel (10 mg/mL) were equivalent to those of collagen gel (3 mg/mL), which is commonly used in regenerative medicine and gel cultures. Based on reported findings, the physical properties of the novel functional substrate for culturing and regenerative medicine L-ECM were quantified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessArticle A Bioactive Hydrogel and 3D Printed Polycaprolactone System for Bone Tissue Engineering
Received: 27 May 2017 / Revised: 29 June 2017 / Accepted: 4 July 2017 / Published: 6 July 2017
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (4497 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
In this study, a hybrid system consisting of 3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL) filled with hydrogel was developed as an application for reconstruction of long bone defects, which are innately difficult to repair due to large missing segments of bone. A 3D printed gyroid [...] Read more.
In this study, a hybrid system consisting of 3D printed polycaprolactone (PCL) filled with hydrogel was developed as an application for reconstruction of long bone defects, which are innately difficult to repair due to large missing segments of bone. A 3D printed gyroid scaffold of PCL allowed a larger amount of hydrogel to be loaded within the scaffolds as compared to 3D printed mesh and honeycomb scaffolds of similar volumes and strut thicknesses. The hydrogel was a mixture of alginate, gelatin, and nano-hydroxyapatite, infiltrated with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to enhance the osteoconductivity and biocompatibility of the system. Adhesion and viability of hMSC in the PCL/hydrogel system confirmed its cytocompatibility. Biomineralization tests in simulated body fluid (SBF) showed the nucleation and growth of apatite crystals, which confirmed the bioactivity of the PCL/hydrogel system. Moreover, dissolution studies, in SBF revealed a sustained dissolution of the hydrogel with time. Overall, the present study provides a new approach in bone tissue engineering to repair bone defects with a bioactive hybrid system consisting of a polymeric scaffold, hydrogel, and hMSC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Review

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Open AccessReview Microfluidic Spun Alginate Hydrogel Microfibers and Their Application in Tissue Engineering
Received: 9 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 24 March 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
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Abstract
Tissue engineering is focusing on processing tissue micro-structures for a variety of applications in cell biology and the “bottom-up” construction of artificial tissue. Over the last decade, microfluidic devices have provided novel tools for producing alginate hydrogel microfibers with various morphologies, structures, and [...] Read more.
Tissue engineering is focusing on processing tissue micro-structures for a variety of applications in cell biology and the “bottom-up” construction of artificial tissue. Over the last decade, microfluidic devices have provided novel tools for producing alginate hydrogel microfibers with various morphologies, structures, and compositions for cell cultivation. Moreover, microfluidic spun alginate microfibers are long, thin, and flexible, and these features facilitate higher-order assemblies for fabricating macroscopic cellular structures. In this paper, we present an overview of the microfluidic spinning principle of alginate hydrogel microfibers and their application as micro-scaffolds or scaffolding elements for 3D assembly in tissue engineering. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Polyampholyte Hydrogels in Biomedical Applications
Received: 21 September 2017 / Revised: 2 November 2017 / Accepted: 3 November 2017 / Published: 4 November 2017
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (1562 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Polyampholytes are a class of polymers made up of positively and negatively charged monomer subunits. Polyampholytes offer a unique tunable set of properties driven by the interactions between the charged monomer subunits. Some tunable properties of polyampholytes include mechanical properties, nonfouling characteristics, swelling [...] Read more.
Polyampholytes are a class of polymers made up of positively and negatively charged monomer subunits. Polyampholytes offer a unique tunable set of properties driven by the interactions between the charged monomer subunits. Some tunable properties of polyampholytes include mechanical properties, nonfouling characteristics, swelling due to changes in pH or salt concentration, and drug delivery capability. These characteristics lend themselves to multiple biomedical applications, and this review paper will summarize applications of polyampholyte polymers demonstrated over the last five years in tissue engineering, cryopreservation and drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications: Their Characteristics and the Mechanisms behind Them
Received: 16 August 2016 / Revised: 11 November 2016 / Accepted: 11 January 2017 / Published: 24 January 2017
Cited by 35 | PDF Full-text (1223 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Hydrogels are hydrophilic, three-dimensional networks that are able to absorb large quantities of water or biological fluids, and thus have the potential to be used as prime candidates for biosensors, drug delivery vectors, and carriers or matrices for cells in tissue engineering. In [...] Read more.
Hydrogels are hydrophilic, three-dimensional networks that are able to absorb large quantities of water or biological fluids, and thus have the potential to be used as prime candidates for biosensors, drug delivery vectors, and carriers or matrices for cells in tissue engineering. In this critical review article, advantages of the hydrogels that overcome the limitations from other types of biomaterials will be discussed. Hydrogels, depending on their chemical composition, are responsive to various stimuli including heating, pH, light, and chemicals. Two swelling mechanisms will be discussed to give a detailed understanding of how the structure parameters affect swelling properties, followed by the gelation mechanism and mesh size calculation. Hydrogels prepared from natural materials such as polysaccharides and polypeptides, along with different types of synthetic hydrogels from the recent reported literature, will be discussed in detail. Finally, attention will be given to biomedical applications of different kinds of hydrogels including cell culture, self-healing, and drug delivery. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessFeature PaperReview Bioresponsive Hydrogels: Chemical Strategies and Perspectives in Tissue Engineering
Received: 4 August 2016 / Revised: 28 September 2016 / Accepted: 8 October 2016 / Published: 14 October 2016
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (3372 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Disease, trauma, and aging account for a significant number of clinical disorders. Regenerative medicine is emerging as a very promising therapeutic option. The design and development of new cell-customised biomaterials able to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM) functionalities represents one of the major strategies [...] Read more.
Disease, trauma, and aging account for a significant number of clinical disorders. Regenerative medicine is emerging as a very promising therapeutic option. The design and development of new cell-customised biomaterials able to mimic extracellular matrix (ECM) functionalities represents one of the major strategies to control the cell fate and stimulate tissue regeneration. Recently, hydrogels have received a considerable interest for their use in the modulation and control of cell fate during the regeneration processes. Several synthetic bioresponsive hydrogels are being developed in order to facilitate cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions. In this review, new strategies and future perspectives of such synthetic cell microenvironments will be highlighted. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview Hydrogels as Extracellular Matrix Analogs
Received: 13 May 2016 / Revised: 29 June 2016 / Accepted: 25 July 2016 / Published: 3 August 2016
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (6920 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissue that provides physical scaffolding to cells. Emerging studies have shown that beyond structural support, the ECM provides tissue-specific biochemical and biophysical cues that are required for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. Hydrogel-based platforms have [...] Read more.
The extracellular matrix (ECM) is the non-cellular component of tissue that provides physical scaffolding to cells. Emerging studies have shown that beyond structural support, the ECM provides tissue-specific biochemical and biophysical cues that are required for tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis. Hydrogel-based platforms have played a key role in advancing our knowledge of the role of ECM in regulating various cellular functions. Synthetic hydrogels allow for tunable biofunctionality, as their material properties can be tailored to mimic those of native tissues. This review discusses current advances in the design of hydrogels with defined physical and chemical properties. We also highlight research findings that demonstrate the impact of matrix properties on directing stem cell fate, such as self-renewal and differentiation. Recent and future efforts towards understanding cell-material interactions will not only advance our basic understanding, but will also help design tissue-specific matrices and delivery systems to transplant stem cells and control their response in vivo. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview Combinatorial Method/High Throughput Strategies for Hydrogel Optimization in Tissue Engineering Applications
Received: 25 March 2016 / Revised: 1 June 2016 / Accepted: 3 June 2016 / Published: 8 June 2016
Cited by 7 | PDF Full-text (1567 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Combinatorial method/high throughput strategies, which have long been used in the pharmaceutical industry, have recently been applied to hydrogel optimization for tissue engineering applications. Although many combinatorial methods have been developed, few are suitable for use in tissue engineering hydrogel optimization. Currently, only [...] Read more.
Combinatorial method/high throughput strategies, which have long been used in the pharmaceutical industry, have recently been applied to hydrogel optimization for tissue engineering applications. Although many combinatorial methods have been developed, few are suitable for use in tissue engineering hydrogel optimization. Currently, only three approaches (design of experiment, arrays and continuous gradients) have been utilized. This review highlights recent work with each approach. The benefits and disadvantages of design of experiment, array and continuous gradient approaches depending on study objectives and the general advantages of using combinatorial methods for hydrogel optimization over traditional optimization strategies will be discussed. Fabrication considerations for combinatorial method/high throughput samples will additionally be addressed to provide an assessment of the current state of the field, and potential future contributions to expedited material optimization and design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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Open AccessReview Controlling Cell Functions and Fate with Surfaces and Hydrogels: The Role of Material Features in Cell Adhesion and Signal Transduction
Received: 22 January 2016 / Revised: 23 February 2016 / Accepted: 1 March 2016 / Published: 14 March 2016
Cited by 8 | PDF Full-text (4250 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In their natural environment, cells are constantly exposed to a cohort of biochemical and biophysical signals that govern their functions and fate. Therefore, materials for biomedical applications, either in vivo or in vitro, should provide a replica of the complex patterns of [...] Read more.
In their natural environment, cells are constantly exposed to a cohort of biochemical and biophysical signals that govern their functions and fate. Therefore, materials for biomedical applications, either in vivo or in vitro, should provide a replica of the complex patterns of biological signals. Thus, the development of a novel class of biomaterials requires, on the one side, the understanding of the dynamic interactions occurring at the interface of cells and materials; on the other, it requires the development of technologies able to integrate multiple signals precisely organized in time and space. A large body of studies aimed at investigating the mechanisms underpinning cell-material interactions is mostly based on 2D systems. While these have been instrumental in shaping our understanding of the recognition of and reaction to material stimuli, they lack the ability to capture central features of the natural cellular environment, such as dimensionality, remodelling and degradability. In this work, we review the fundamental traits of material signal sensing and cell response. We then present relevant technologies and materials that enable fabricating systems able to control various aspects of cell behavior, and we highlight potential differences that arise from 2D and 3D settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hydrogels in Tissue Engineering) Printed Edition available
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