Special Issue "Genetic Relationships and Artificial Hybridization within the Forest Trees"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Genetics and Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 1776

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Andrej Kormuťák
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Guest Editor
SKInstitute of Plant Genetics and Biotechnology PSBC SAS Nitra, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Bratislava, Slovakia
Interests: genetic relationships; population genetics
Prof. Dr. Gary R. Hodge
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Guest Editor
Department of Forestry & Environmental Resources, College of Natural Resources, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA
Interests: quantitative genetics; tree breeding; hybrids; wood properties; NIR spectroscopy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Within context of the biological species' concept, the artificial hybridization of plants serves as a useful tool in estimating the genetic relationships between species. Genetically, the interspecific hybrids are thought to harbour greater variation than corresponding parental species what endows them a higher adaptability towards unusual habitats. Advanced generation hybrids are likely to have even a greater range of genetic variation due to segregation after the first generation. Genetic variation in genome size of the hybrids and in their parental species is believed to be positively related to the phylogenetic distance between the parental species. However, general combining abilities estimated from pure species combinations and from hybrid combinations do not always seem compatible. Therefore, further estimates of these parameters are necessary to help the breeders in making better long-term decisions. Of practical importance is also the value of hybrids in increasing wood production and in improving wood quality for the forest industry. The interspecific hybrid trees planted throughout the world on a commercial basis are most common in genera Acacia, Eucalyptus, Larix, Picea, Pinus and Populus. A reliable validation of the hybrids together with prediction of hybrid performance and fitness are important aspects in deciding on the optimal hybrid breeding strategy. They should be taken into account when preparing the manuscripts on the subject.

Dr. Andrej Kormuťák
Prof. Dr. Gary R. Hodge
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • forest trees
  • species
  • crossability
  • fertility
  • performance

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Geographic Cline and Genetic Introgression Effects on Seed Morphology Variation and Germination Fitness in Two Closely Related Pine Species in Southeast Asia
Forests 2022, 13(3), 374; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13030374 - 23 Feb 2022
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Abstract
There is still limited information on how genetic introgression impacts morphological variation and population fitness in long-lived conifer species. Two closely related pine species, Pinus kesiya Royle ex Gordon and Pinus yunnanensis Franch. are widely distributed over Southeast Asia and Yunnan province of [...] Read more.
There is still limited information on how genetic introgression impacts morphological variation and population fitness in long-lived conifer species. Two closely related pine species, Pinus kesiya Royle ex Gordon and Pinus yunnanensis Franch. are widely distributed over Southeast Asia and Yunnan province of China, with a large spatial scale of asymmetric genetic introgression and hybridization, and form a hybrid lineage, P. kesiya var. langbianensis, where their ranges overlap in southeast Yunnan. We compared seed trait variation and germination performance between hybrids and parental species and characterized environmental gradients to investigate the genetic and ecological evolutionary consequences of genetic introgression. We found that seed width (SW) differed significantly among the three pines, and all the seed traits were significantly negatively correlated with latitude and associated with the mean temperatures of the driest and wettest quarters. A higher germination fitness of hybrids was detected at a low temperature, indicating that they had better adaptability to temperature stress than their parental species during the germination process. Our results suggest that environmental factors shape seed phenotypic variation in the pine species and that genetic introgression significantly affects seed germination fitness. Therefore, assisting gene flow in natural forest populations might facilitate their adaptation to climate change. Full article
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Article
Molecular Insight into Genetic Structure and Diversity of Putative Hybrid Swarms of Pinus sylvestris × P. mugo in Slovakia
Forests 2022, 13(2), 205; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13020205 - 28 Jan 2022
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Abstract
The genetic structures of the four putative hybrid swarms of Pinus sylvestris × P. mugo in Slovakia were analyzed in terms of individual admixture proportions calculated via inter-primer binding site (iPBS) marker loci. This work aimed to reevaluate the hybrid swarms’ differentiation [...] Read more.
The genetic structures of the four putative hybrid swarms of Pinus sylvestris × P. mugo in Slovakia were analyzed in terms of individual admixture proportions calculated via inter-primer binding site (iPBS) marker loci. This work aimed to reevaluate the hybrid swarms’ differentiation status as postulated in the previous studies at both population and genomic levels. The study confirmed intermediate divergence of each of the swarms examined. Based on 80-loci hybrid index scores, we have revealed the presence of introgressive and intermediate hybrids with frequencies corresponding to differentiation estimates. Surprisingly, irrespective of individual phenotypes, the most frequent intermediates were found in Sucha Hora (29.5%) and Obsivanka (28.6%) populations, which resemble rather pure P. mugo and were previously considered as bimodal hybrid zones with a negligible amount of hybrids. The remaining hybrid zone population Zuberec seems to be highly introgressed to P. sylvestris, while Tisovnica is clearly inclined to P. mugo. The results and different methodologies are discussed. Full article
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