Fungal Diversity in Forest Ecosystems

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2022) | Viewed by 12730

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Ecology and Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: diversity of wood-inhabiting fungi; phylogeny; taxonomy of macrofungi; forest pathology; medicinal and edible mushroom
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Microbiology, School of Ecology and Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, P.O. Box 61, Beijing 100083, China
Interests: fungal resources; fungal diversity; phylogeny and systematics of macrofungi; fungal ecology; fungal enzymes; edible and medicinal fungi
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Macrofungi, as an important component in forest ecosystems, consist of most members of Basidiomycota and some members of Ascomycota, having important economic values and ecological functions. The fungal diversity is very high in forest ecosystems, and many taxa are still unknown.

This Special Issue on the Fungal Diversity in Forest Ecosystems is focused on macrofungi in forests, especially on fungal diversity, fungal ecology, molecular phylogeny, systematics, and forest pathology. Reviews and research articles may focus on any group of wood-inhabiting or mycorrhizal fungi. Edible or medicinal fungi in forest are welcome, too.

Prof. Dr. Yucheng Dai
Prof. Dr. Baokai Cui
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • fungal diversity
  • macrofungi in forests
  • phylogeny
  • systematics
  • fungal ecology

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

13 pages, 2865 KiB  
Article
Taxonomy and an Updated Phylogeny of Anomoloma (Amylocorticiales, Basidiomycota)
by Meng Zhou, Josef Vlasák, Masoomeh Ghobad-Nejhad, Young Woon Lim and Yu-Cheng Dai
Forests 2022, 13(5), 713; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050713 - 2 May 2022
Viewed by 1804
Abstract
Anomoloma is a cosmopolitan poroid wood-decaying genus, belonging to the Amylocorticiales. During a study on polypores, two new species of Anomoloma were found in Eurasia, and they are described as A. denticulatum and A. eurasiaticum. To examine the phylogenetic relationships among species [...] Read more.
Anomoloma is a cosmopolitan poroid wood-decaying genus, belonging to the Amylocorticiales. During a study on polypores, two new species of Anomoloma were found in Eurasia, and they are described as A. denticulatum and A. eurasiaticum. To examine the phylogenetic relationships among species of Anomoloma, we analyzed nuclear ribosomal sequence data from the ITS regions and the LSU gene. The result demonstrates that A. denticulatum and A. eurasiaticum are independent species that belong to the Anomoloma genus. Both new species share the principal characteristics of the genus, but Anomoloma denticulatum is characterized by extensive white rhizomorphs spreading under the whole fruiting body, angular pores measuring 1–2 per mm, distinctly lacerate to dentate dissepiments and basidiospores of 3.5–4.3 × 2–2.5 μm. Anomoloma eurasiaticum is characterized by bearing plenty of large crystals on the mycelia and growth on Picea in high altitude areas. A key to the accepted species of Anomoloma worldwide is provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Diversity in Forest Ecosystems)
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15 pages, 3173 KiB  
Article
Fungal Community Composition and Enzyme Activity in Different Type Bark of Pinus koraiensis
by Yu-Lian Wei, Qiu-Shi Li, Zhen Bai and Qing-Xue Wu
Forests 2021, 12(12), 1781; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12121781 - 15 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1927
Abstract
Pinus koraiensis Sieb. et Zucc. is an endemic and dominant tree in temperate zone needle broad-leaf mixed forest and has great economic and ecological value. As the barrier, pine bark has many important functions. However, the ecological functions and forming mechanism of bark [...] Read more.
Pinus koraiensis Sieb. et Zucc. is an endemic and dominant tree in temperate zone needle broad-leaf mixed forest and has great economic and ecological value. As the barrier, pine bark has many important functions. However, the ecological functions and forming mechanism of bark fungal community are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to reveal the fungal community of Korean pine bark from Changbai Nature Reserve of Northeast China. Based on Illumina Hiseq2000 platform with five different types from three sites, the results showed that the bark types and collecting sites have strong influence on the fungal community structure. CCA demonstrates the physico-chemical properties of barks and sample collecting height are important factors. Spearman’s correlation coefficients between dominant ASVs and these factors showed the impact in detail. Dominant ASVs in living and dead tree bark are animal or plant pathogens mainly, and they are negative with the total N and P. Meanwhile, wood saprotroph and other undefined saprotroph fungi occur in the bark near the ground and they prefer the substrate with higher total N and P content. Furthermore, enzymes activities including lignin-related oxidoreductases, cellulose and hydrolytic enzyme are affected significantly by the bark’s physico-chemical properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Diversity in Forest Ecosystems)
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18 pages, 5871 KiB  
Article
New Species of Tomentella (Thelephorales, Basidiomycota) from Temperate Continental Mountain Climate of China (Xinjiang Region)
by Xu Lu and Hai-Sheng Yuan
Forests 2021, 12(11), 1531; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12111531 - 7 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2016
Abstract
Species in the genus Tomentella are distributed throughout the temperate and tropical regions worldwide, but few studies associated with the taxonomy and phylogeny of this genus had been reported from Northwest China. In this paper, molecular phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal ITS [...] Read more.
Species in the genus Tomentella are distributed throughout the temperate and tropical regions worldwide, but few studies associated with the taxonomy and phylogeny of this genus had been reported from Northwest China. In this paper, molecular phylogenetic analyses of the nuclear ribosomal ITS (internal transcribed spacer: ITS1-5.8S-ITS2) and LSU (large subunit: 28S) sequences combined with morphological characteristics identified three new species from Xinjiang Autonomous Region in Northwest China, which were named T. aurantispora, T. kanasensis, and T. schrenkiana. Similar macromorphological and anatomical characteristics are shared by these new species: arachnoid basidiocarps; byssoid sterile margins; utriform basidia with a clamp connection at the base; the absence of rhizomorphs and cystidia; and slightly thick-walled, subglobose to globose basidiospores. Among these new species, the color of the hymenophoral surface, the size of the basidiospores, and some other features can be used for species delimitation. The new species and closely related species in the phylogenetic tree were discussed, and a key to the identified species of Tomentella from China was provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Diversity in Forest Ecosystems)
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19 pages, 9227 KiB  
Article
Taxonomy and Phylogeny of the Favolaschia calocera Complex (Mycenaceae) with Descriptions of Four New Species
by Qiu-Yue Zhang and Yu-Cheng Dai
Forests 2021, 12(10), 1397; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12101397 - 14 Oct 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3381
Abstract
Favolaschia calocera was originally described from Madagascar, and reported to have a worldwide distribution. In the current study, samples of the Favolaschia calocera from Central America, Australia, China, Kenya, Italy, New Zealand, and Thailand were analyzed by using both morphological and molecular methods. [...] Read more.
Favolaschia calocera was originally described from Madagascar, and reported to have a worldwide distribution. In the current study, samples of the Favolaschia calocera from Central America, Australia, China, Kenya, Italy, New Zealand, and Thailand were analyzed by using both morphological and molecular methods. Phylogenetic analyses were based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) dataset, and the combined five-locus dataset of ITS, large subunit nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (nLSU), the small subunit mitochondrial rRNA gene (mt-SSU), the small subunit of nuclear ribosomal RNA gene (nu-SSU), and the translation elongation factor 1α (TEF1). Our study proves that Favolaschia calocera is a species complex, and six species are recognized in the complex including four new species. Three new species F. brevibasidiata, F. brevistipitata, and F. longistipitata from China; and one new species F. minutissima from Asia. In addition, Favolaschia claudopus (Singer) Q.Y. Zhang & C. Dai, earlier treated as a variety of Favolaschia calocera R. Heim, were raised to species rank. Illustrated descriptions of these five new taxa are given. An identification key and a comparison of the characteristics of species in the Favolaschia calocera complex are provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Diversity in Forest Ecosystems)
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17 pages, 5543 KiB  
Article
Taxonomy and Molecular Phylogeny of Phellodon (Thelephorales) with Descriptions of Four New Species from Southwest China
by Chang-Ge Song, Xing Ji, Shun Liu, Xiao-Lan He and Bao-Kai Cui
Forests 2021, 12(7), 932; https://doi.org/10.3390/f12070932 - 16 Jul 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2329
Abstract
Phellodon is a genus of ectomycorrhizal fungi belonging to the group known as the stipitate hydnoids. It is associated with coniferous trees in forest ecosystems and is widely distributed in the northern hemisphere. Phellodon, together with Hydnellum, and Sarcodon, is classified in [...] Read more.
Phellodon is a genus of ectomycorrhizal fungi belonging to the group known as the stipitate hydnoids. It is associated with coniferous trees in forest ecosystems and is widely distributed in the northern hemisphere. Phellodon, together with Hydnellum, and Sarcodon, is classified in the Bankeraceae, members of which are generally considered as symbiotic fungi. Ectomycorrhizal fungi can help plant roots fix nitrogen and improve the absorption capacity of soil nutrients by trees, so they play an important role in ecosystem protection. Taxonomic and phylogenetic studies of Chinese Phellodon collections were carried out. Four new Phellodon species were discovered from southwestern China based on a combination of morphological characters and molecular data. Phellodon atroardesiacus is characterized by the blackish blue to dark grey pileus, dark grey to ash grey spines, and presence of clamp connections in spines. Phellodon cinereofuscus is distinguished by a cottony tomentose pileal margin, long spines which become clay-buff when dry, and echinulate basidiospores. Phellodon stramineus is characterized by a depressed and tomentose pileus, straw buff-colored pileal surface, and dark grey to ash grey spines. Phellodon yunnanensis is distinguished by a clay-pink to brown pileus, pale brown to white spines, and the presence of clamp connections in the outer layer of stipe. Detailed descriptions, illustrations, and ecological traits for the new taxa are provided. Phylogenetic analyses inferred from the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions confirmed that the four new species are distinct within Phellodon. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Diversity in Forest Ecosystems)
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