Special Issue "MNF 2016 Special Issue—Micro/Nanofluids"

A special issue of Fluids (ISSN 2311-5521).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 May 2017) | Viewed by 4778

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Fabio Inzoli
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambuschini, 4a, 20156 Milano, Italy
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; multiphase flows; heat transfer
Dr. Riccardo Mereu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Energy, Politecnico di Milano, Via Lambuschini, 4a, 20156 Milano, Italy
Interests: computational fluid dynamics; turbulence; multiphase flows

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue will publish selected papers from the 5th International Conference on Micro and Nano Flows, MNF2016 http://mnf2016.com/, hosted by the Politecnico di Milano, Italy, from 11–14 September, 2016. Manuscripts submitted to the journal Fluids should be extended by at least 30%–50% compared with the conference.

Micro and Nanofluid investigation is commonly used for heat transfer enhancement, increasing the thermal conductivity of heat transfer fluids in different fields, such as refrigeration, electronics, biomedical, heating and cooling of buildings, and energy power applications.
The Special Issue aims to collect contributions of the state-of-the-art of nanofluids investigation. The main focus of the volume is on single and multiphase flows without and with mass transfer by using theoretical, experimental, and numerical modeling approaches, included Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Contributions regarding the energy (refrigeration, energy power, etc.) and biomedical application are strongly encouraged.

Prof. Dr. Fabio Inzoli
Dr. Riccardo Mereu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fluids is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • single phase flows
  • multiphase flows
  • experimental
  • numerical modeling
  • computational fluid dynamics

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Flow Configurations in a Y Splitting-Junction Microchannel
Fluids 2017, 2(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids2020018 - 22 Apr 2017
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2412
Abstract
In the present work, the flow field in a splitting-junction micro channel with a Y shape, which is the simplest geometry to be employed for heat and mass transfer in micro-devices such as micro-heat-exchangers and micro-mixers, is investigated experimentally using micro Particle Image [...] Read more.
In the present work, the flow field in a splitting-junction micro channel with a Y shape, which is the simplest geometry to be employed for heat and mass transfer in micro-devices such as micro-heat-exchangers and micro-mixers, is investigated experimentally using micro Particle Image Velocimetry (μPIV). The angular divergence in the Y splitting is changed, as well as the Reynolds number, in order to investigate the instantaneous and mean flow fields to determine which configurations are more suitable for practical applications. The results show that the flow configuration is strongly dependent on the Y shape angle, especially in the junction part, and that there is also a significant dependence on the Reynolds number. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MNF 2016 Special Issue—Micro/Nanofluids)
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Article
Uncertainty Quantification at the Molecular–Continuum Model Interface
Fluids 2017, 2(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/fluids2010012 - 21 Mar 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2134
Abstract
Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are widely employed to study transport fluid properties. Observables measured at the atomistic level can serve as inputs for continuum calculations, allowing for improved analysis of phenomena involving multiple scales. In hybrid modelling, uncertainties present in the information transferred [...] Read more.
Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are widely employed to study transport fluid properties. Observables measured at the atomistic level can serve as inputs for continuum calculations, allowing for improved analysis of phenomena involving multiple scales. In hybrid modelling, uncertainties present in the information transferred across scales can have a significant impact on the final predictions. This work shows the influence of force-field variability on molecular measurements of the shear viscosity of water. In addition, the uncertainty propagation is demonstrated by quantifying the sensitivity of continuum velocity distribution to the particle-based calculations. The uncertainty is modelled with polynomial chaos expansion using a non-intrusive spectral projection strategy. The analysis confirms that low-order polynomial basis are sufficient to calculate the dispersion of observables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue MNF 2016 Special Issue—Micro/Nanofluids)
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