Special Issue "Monitoring and Management of Inland Waters"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (13 July 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Silvia Quadroni
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Theoretical and Applied Sciences, University of Insubria, Varese, Italy
Interests: environmental monitoring; biomonitoring; benthic macroinvertebrates; Alpine streams; regulated rivers; hydromorphological alterations; controlled sediment flushing; ecological flows; eco-friendly management of water resources; lakes; contamination; persistent organic pollutants; organochlorine compounds; food webs; ecological risk assessment; human risk assessment; fish; geometric morphometrics; biological conservation; biological invasion

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Inland waters are important ecosystems for both their biodiversity and the services they provide to humans. Monitoring their components is essential to improve the knowledge of structure and functions of these ecosystems and to assess their health status. Monitoring is also fundamental to evaluate the impact of anthropic pressures, such as water use for hydropower, irrigation, or drinking purposes, pollution due to present and past production and use of chemicals, and the introduction of allochthonous species. Only through the information coming from monitoring data can the management of water resources be planned or improved in order to continue to exploit them for necessary services with a lower impact on the freshwater environment.

This Special Issue aims to: (i) provide information on tools currently applied for the monitoring of different (both abiotic and biotic) components of freshwater ecosystems, (ii) show results of monitoring carried out to improve the basic knowledge of these aquatic environments and their health status and/or to highlight the impact of different anthropic pressures, and (iii) collect new evidence about eco-friendly management strategies related to the use of water resources or to activities impacting on inland waters.

Dr. Silvia Quadroni
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • freshwaters
  • monitoring tools
  • monitoring data
  • ecosystem health
  • anthropic pressures
  • ecological impact
  • management strategies

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Communication
Monitoring of Neotropical Streams Using Macroinvertebrate Communities: Evidence from Honduras
Environments 2021, 8(4), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments8040027 - 31 Mar 2021
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Abstract
Assessing the water quality by using biological indicators is a reliable and economically feasible way to promote environmental conservation in developing tropical countries. Here, we report one of the few examples of river biomonitoring in Honduras. In June 2005, benthic macroinvertebrates were collected [...] Read more.
Assessing the water quality by using biological indicators is a reliable and economically feasible way to promote environmental conservation in developing tropical countries. Here, we report one of the few examples of river biomonitoring in Honduras. In June 2005, benthic macroinvertebrates were collected from six sites in the Río Cangrejal basin. An adapted version of the Biological Monitoring Working Party index (BMWP) was used to assess the water quality because it is simple, consolidated, relatively easy to use, and needs a family-level identification. Moreover, two other community metrics were calculated, namely the total taxon richness and local contribution to beta diversity (LCBD). Differences in the biomonitoring and diversity metrics among sites and their correlations were statistically tested. Thirty-nine macroinvertebrate taxa were collected and, despite significant differences in the BMWP score, all sampling sites were classified in the high environmental quality class. A very strong and positive correlation between the BMPW and taxon richness was found, while LCBD did not vary significantly and did not correlate with the other metrics. Our results suggest that taxon richness could be used as a surrogate indicator to assess the water quality when consolidate biomonitoring methods are not available. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring and Management of Inland Waters)
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Article
Genetic Investigation of Four Beluga Sturgeon (Huso huso, L.) Broodstocks for its Reintroduction in the Po River Basin
Environments 2021, 8(4), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments8040025 - 27 Mar 2021
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Abstract
The reintroduction of the extinct beluga sturgeon (Huso huso L.), an anadromous species with economic and traditional relevance, is a priority in next conservation strategies in Northern Italy. The EU-LIFE NATURA project aims to reintroduce the beluga sturgeon in the Po River [...] Read more.
The reintroduction of the extinct beluga sturgeon (Huso huso L.), an anadromous species with economic and traditional relevance, is a priority in next conservation strategies in Northern Italy. The EU-LIFE NATURA project aims to reintroduce the beluga sturgeon in the Po River basin through a captive breeding program. Critical requirements for the success of the program are river connectivity and knowledge of genetic diversity of the selected broodstocks to ensure self-sustainability of reintroduced populations. Here, the four broodstocks used for the reintroduction of beluga sturgeon have been genetically screened, genotyping 13 loci and sequencing mitochondrial DNA cytochrome b (Cyt b) gene and the entire mitochondrial DNA control region (D-Loop). The four broodstocks showed a medium-high level of nuclear genetic variability and the presence of two sub-populations, evidencing a total level of inbreeding coefficients able to sustain the good potential as future breeders. Mitochondrial analyses showed a genetic variability comparable to wild populations, further strengthening the positive potential of the investigated broodstock. Therefore, this study, showed how the degree of genetic diversity found within the four broodstocks used for H. huso reintroduction in the Po River basin could be suitable to ensure the success of the program, avoiding the inbreeding depression associated with founder effect and captive breeding. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring and Management of Inland Waters)
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Article
Multi-Year Monitoring of Ecosystem Metabolism in Two Branches of a Cold-Water Stream
Environments 2021, 8(3), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments8030019 - 28 Feb 2021
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Abstract
Climate change is likely to have large impacts on freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem function, especially in cold-water streams. Ecosystem metabolism is affected by water temperature and discharge, both of which are expected to be affected by climate change and, thus, require long-term monitoring [...] Read more.
Climate change is likely to have large impacts on freshwater biodiversity and ecosystem function, especially in cold-water streams. Ecosystem metabolism is affected by water temperature and discharge, both of which are expected to be affected by climate change and, thus, require long-term monitoring to assess alterations in stream function. This study examined ecosystem metabolism in two branches of a trout stream in Minnesota, USA over 3 years. One branch was warmer, allowing the examination of elevated temperature on metabolism. Dissolved oxygen levels were assessed every 10 min from spring through fall in 2017–2019. Gross primary production (GPP) was higher in the colder branch in all years. GPP in both branches was highest before leaf-out in the spring. Ecosystem respiration (ER) was greater in the warmer stream in two of three years. Both streams were heterotrophic in all years (net ecosystem production—NEP < 0). There were significant effects of temperature and light on GPP, ER, and NEP. Stream discharge had a significant impact on all GPP, ER, and NEP in the colder stream, but only on ER and NEP in the warmer stream. This study indicated that the impacts of temperature, light, and discharge differ among years, and, at least at the local scale, may not follow expected patterns. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring and Management of Inland Waters)
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Review

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Review
Assessing the Impacts of Hydropeaking on River Benthic Macroinvertebrates: A State-of-the-Art Methodological Overview
Environments 2021, 8(7), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments8070067 - 18 Jul 2021
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Abstract
As the global demand for renewable electricity grows, hydropower development of river basins increases across the world. Hydropeaking, i.e., streamflow alteration consisting of daily or subdaily rapid and marked discharge fluctuations, can affect river reaches below hydropower units. Environmental effects of hydropeaking include [...] Read more.
As the global demand for renewable electricity grows, hydropower development of river basins increases across the world. Hydropeaking, i.e., streamflow alteration consisting of daily or subdaily rapid and marked discharge fluctuations, can affect river reaches below hydropower units. Environmental effects of hydropeaking include geomorphological alterations and possible modifications of the freshwater biota. Among affected instream communities, benthic macroinvertebrates are receiving increasing attention and the related scientific research has experienced significant progress in the last decade. In this context, this paper aims to summarize state-of-the-art methods for the assessment of hydropeaking impacts on benthic macroinvertebrate communities. The present review could support the proper design of monitoring plans aimed at assessing the ecological impacts of hydropeaking and the effects of possible mitigation strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Monitoring and Management of Inland Waters)
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