Special Issue "Dynamic of Vegetation and Climate Change"

A special issue of Environments (ISSN 2076-3298).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Carlos Pinto-Gomes
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of landscape, environment and planning (DPAO), University of Évora, Rua Romão Ramalho, nº 59, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
Interests: flora; geobotany; management of natural plant heritage; natural and seminatural habitats; vegetation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mauro Raposo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of landscape, environment and planning (DPAO), University of Évora, Rua Romão Ramalho, nº 59, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
Interests: biogeography; flora, geobotany, landscape architecture; sustainability, vegetation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A set of climatic events that have occurred across the paleolitic ages all the way to today have caused profound changes in the biosphere, such as the periods of glaciation and global warming. In response to these changes, natural systems change: Some species increase their area of distribution, while others’ decreases, or they end up disappearing. These strong changes are responsible for environmental quality; they influence and are influenced by human communities. In this context, knowledge of the potential natural vegetation is key, to understand global changes and identify possible treats. The value of bioindicator plants is clear, used as a predictive tool to interpret the landscape and therefore analyze the evolution of vegetation cover, as well as the types of land use more suitable to each portion of territory.

This Special Issue looks for new material not yet published, which relates the natural plant communities and their dynamic evolution (in a short or a long term) to bioclimatic changes and anthropic actions in the landscape, through analyses of the floristic composition, the edaphoclimatic conditions, and integration management methods. We particularly welcome paperwork obtained from empirical research, modeling, remote sensing, landscape planning, decision support tools, fundamental plant or vegetation science, and specific case-studies which span a range of spatial and temporal scales. These studies should contribute to an improvement in the quality of the environment, based on the importance of vegetation and throughout its rational management, concerning the long-term survival of the planet. We invite each author to contribute, sending one or more articles that embrace this general purpose and respond to one or more of the indicated keywords.

Prof. Dr. Carlos Pinto-Gomes
Dr. Mauro Raposo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Environments is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Bioclimatology
  • Biogeography
  • Climate change
  • Ecological resilience
  • Ecosystem management
  • Geobotany
  • Invasive plants
  • Nature conservation
  • Public policies
  • Vegetation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Article
Short Term Elevated CO2 Interacts with Iron Deficiency, Further Repressing Growth, Photosynthesis and Mineral Accumulation in Soybean (Glycine max L.) and Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)
Environments 2021, 8(11), 122; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments8110122 - 08 Nov 2021
Viewed by 339
Abstract
Elevated CO2 (eCO2) has been reported to cause mineral losses in several important food crops such as soybean (Glycine max L.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). In addition, more than 30% of the world’s arable land is [...] Read more.
Elevated CO2 (eCO2) has been reported to cause mineral losses in several important food crops such as soybean (Glycine max L.) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). In addition, more than 30% of the world’s arable land is calcareous, leading to iron (Fe) deficiency chlorosis and lower Fe levels in plant tissues. We hypothesize that there will be combinatorial effects of eCO2 and Fe deficiency on the mineral dynamics of these crops at a morphological, biochemical and physiological level. To test this hypothesis, plants were grown hydroponically under Fe sufficiency (20 μM Fe-EDDHA) or deficiency (0 μM Fe-EDDHA) at ambient CO2 (aCO2, 400 ppm) or eCO2 (800 ppm). Plants of both species exposed to eCO2 and Fe deficiency showed the lowest biomass accumulation and the lowest root: shoot ratio. Soybean at eCO2 had significantly higher chlorophyll levels (81%, p < 0.0001) and common bean had significantly higher photosynthetic rates (60%, p < 0.05) but only under Fe sufficiency. In addition, eCO2 increased ferric chelate reductase acivity (FCR) in Fe-sufficient soybean by 4-fold (p < 0.1) and in Fe-deficient common bean plants by 10-fold (p < 0.0001). In common bean, an interactive effect of both environmental factors was observed, resulting in the lowest root Fe levels. The lowering of Fe accumulation in both crops under eCO2 may be linked to the low root citrate accumulation in these plants when grown with unrestricted Fe supply. No changes were observed for malate in soybean, but in common bean, shoot levels were significantly lower under Fe deficiency (77%, p < 0.05) and Fe sufficiency (98%, p < 0.001). These results suggest that the mechanisms involved in reduced Fe accumulation caused by eCO2 and Fe deficiency may not be independent, and an interaction of these factors may lead to further reduced Fe levels. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic of Vegetation and Climate Change)
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Article
Accounting for DEM Error in Sea Level Rise Assessment within Riverine Regions; Case Study from the Shatt Al-Arab River Region
Environments 2021, 8(5), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments8050046 - 18 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1015
Abstract
Global elevation datasets such as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) are the best available terrain data in many parts of the world. Consequently, SRTM is widely used for understanding the risk of coastal inundation due to climate change-induced [...] Read more.
Global elevation datasets such as the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) digital elevation model (DEM) are the best available terrain data in many parts of the world. Consequently, SRTM is widely used for understanding the risk of coastal inundation due to climate change-induced sea level rise. However, SRTM elevations are prone to error, giving rise to uncertainty in the quality of the inundation projections. This study investigated the error propagation model for the Shatt al-Arab River region (SARR) to understand the impact of DEM error on an inundation model in this sensitive, low-lying coastal region. The analysis involved three stages. First, a multiple regression model, parameterized from the Mississippi River delta region, was used to generate an expected DEM error surface for the SARR. This surface was subtracted from the SRTM DEM for the SARR to adjust it. Second, residuals from this model were simulated for the SARR. Modelled residuals were subtracted from the adjusted SRTM to produce 50 DEM realizations capturing potential elevation variation. Third, the DEM realizations were each used in a geospatial “bathtub” inundation model to estimate flooding area in the region given 1 m of sea level rise. Across all realizations, the area predicted to flood covered about 50% of the entire region, while predicted flooding using the raw SRTM covered only about 28%, indicating substantial underprediction of the affected area when error was not accounted for. This study can be an applicable approach within such environments worldwide. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic of Vegetation and Climate Change)
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Article
Germination and Seedling Growth Responses of Zygophyllum fabago, Salsola kali L. and Atriplex canescens to PEG-Induced Drought Stress
Environments 2020, 7(12), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7120107 - 10 Dec 2020
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 1618
Abstract
In arid and semi-arid regions, planting drought-tolerant species is the most useful strategy in the reclamation of degraded soils. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of simulated drought by polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000) on seed germination and seedling growth of three desert [...] Read more.
In arid and semi-arid regions, planting drought-tolerant species is the most useful strategy in the reclamation of degraded soils. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of simulated drought by polyethylene glycol (PEG-6000) on seed germination and seedling growth of three desert plants such as Atriplex canescens, Salsola kali and Zygophyllum fabago. Seeds were subjected to water stress to drought stress by PEG at five stress levels (0, −1, −4, −8, −12, −14 bars). Germination of Z. fabago was completely inhibited at an osmotic potential of −8, −10 and −12 bars and the germination of A. canescens was inhibited only at −14 bar. In contrast, S. kali responded positively to high levels of stress and our results showed the highest final germination percent (71.75, 54 and 18.25%) under three-drought stress −8, −12 and −14 bars, respectively. In addition, increasing PEG concentration adversely affected the germination rate and seedling vigor index as well as the root and shoot length of species. Under high stress levels, S. kali achieved a higher germination rate and seedling vigor index compared to Z. fabago and A. canescens. Among species, S. kali was the only one able to develop roots and shoots at −14 bar. Therefore, S. kali could be considered as a promising plant for the rehabilitation of degraded soils at risk of desertification. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic of Vegetation and Climate Change)
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Article
The Impact of Tourism Activity on Coastal Biodiversity: A Case Study at Praia da Cova Redonda (Algarve—Portugal)
Environments 2020, 7(10), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7100088 - 12 Oct 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1615
Abstract
Tourism activity has a very significant weight in the world economy, even being the main activity responsible for the export of many countries, in the form of providing services to foreign citizens. In mainland Portugal, the main tourist region is the Algarve, where [...] Read more.
Tourism activity has a very significant weight in the world economy, even being the main activity responsible for the export of many countries, in the form of providing services to foreign citizens. In mainland Portugal, the main tourist region is the Algarve, where beach tourism, known as sun and sea tourism, plays a decisive role. However, this activity also has its negative impacts. In the present work, a case study was analyzed, at Praia da Cova Redonda, located in the parish of Porches, in the municipality of Lagoa. Negative impacts on land use and occupation were identified, caused by the excessive presence of people, the introduction of invasive species and the artificial filling of beaches. At the end, a set of mitigating measures are presented that aim to ensure that the exploitation of natural resources can be maintained, but in a perspective of preservation and recovery of natural resources and biodiversity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic of Vegetation and Climate Change)
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Article
Potential Impacts of Climate Change on Areas Suitable to Grow Some Key Crops in New Jersey, USA
Environments 2020, 7(10), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/environments7100076 - 26 Sep 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1462
Abstract
We used the Climate Change and Adaptation Modeler (CCAM), a Terrset software toolset, to project the effects of global climate change on crops in New Jersey. We selected two scenarios—A1FI-MI and B1TME. We found that temperatures will increase by the end of this [...] Read more.
We used the Climate Change and Adaptation Modeler (CCAM), a Terrset software toolset, to project the effects of global climate change on crops in New Jersey. We selected two scenarios—A1FI-MI and B1TME. We found that temperatures will increase by the end of this century compared to 1981–2010 normal temperatures baseline downloaded from PRISM. The temperature increase will vary from 3 to 6 °C depending upon the scenario while the precipitation remains relatively the same. These changes will negatively affect the suitability of many economically valuable crops in New Jersey including blueberry, cranberry, squash, sweet corn and tomato. Many crops that are highly or very suitable will move into marginal or very marginal categories. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dynamic of Vegetation and Climate Change)
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