Special Issue "Threatened Vegetation and Environmental Management"

A special issue of Plants (ISSN 2223-7747). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Genetics, Genomics and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Mauro Raposo
Website
Guest Editor
Department of landscape, environment and planning (DPAO), University of Évora, Rua Romão Ramalho, nº 59, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
Interests: biogeography; flora, geobotany, landscape architecture; sustainability, vegetation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Carlos Pinto-Gomes
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
Department of landscape, environment and planning (DPAO), University of Évora, Rua Romão Ramalho, nº 59, 7000-671 Évora, Portugal
Interests: flora; geobotany; management of natural plant heritage; natural and seminatural habitats; vegetation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several natural and anthropic factors threaten plant communities globally, contributing to the decrease of intraspecific and interspecific diversity of natural systems. The impact of pressures on ecosystems is revealed mainly in the decrease in the area of occurrence of species, some of which present serious problems of survival and dispersion. Relic, threatened, rare, endemic or endangered plants should be the subject of in-depth studies in order to identify threats and pressures to their survival. Thus, taking into account the growing concerns about global climate-related changes and the assessment of ecosystem services, new approaches based on modern methods in field studies and computational approaches that promote rational management of natural systems are needed. With this Special Edition, we seek to generate new ideas about nature conservation, analyze concrete problems related to plant communities, discuss applied management methods and techniques, and find solutions that promote the good conservation status of species. Of particular interest are studies that integrate multiple approaches, especially when it is possible to replicate them in other biogeographic areas, and how public policies should contribute to safeguarding genetic diversity.

Dr. Mauro Raposo
Prof. Dr. Carlos Pinto-Gomes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Plants is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plant chorology
  • Genetical diversity
  • Geobotany
  • Management methods
  • Public policies
  • Relict vegetation
  • Threatened vegetation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Three New Alien Taxa for Europe and a Chorological Update on the Alien Vascular Flora of Calabria (Southern Italy)
Plants 2020, 9(9), 1181; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants9091181 - 11 Sep 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Knowledge on alien species is needed nowadays to protect natural habitats and prevent ecological damage. The presence of new alien plant species in Italy is increasing every day. Calabria, its southernmost region, is not yet well known with regard to this aspect. Thanks [...] Read more.
Knowledge on alien species is needed nowadays to protect natural habitats and prevent ecological damage. The presence of new alien plant species in Italy is increasing every day. Calabria, its southernmost region, is not yet well known with regard to this aspect. Thanks to fieldwork, sampling, and observing many exotic plants in Calabria, here, we report new data on 34 alien taxa. In particular, we found three new taxa for Europe (Cascabela thevetia, Ipomoea setosa subsp. pavonii, and Tecoma stans), three new for Italy (Brugmansia aurea, NarcissusCotinga’, and NarcissusErlicheer’), one new one for the Italian Peninsula (Luffa aegyptiaca), and 21 new taxa for Calabria (Allium cepa, Asparagus setaceus, Bassia scoparia, Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris, Bidens formosa, Casuarina equisetifolia, Cedrus atlantica, Chlorophytum comosum, Cucurbita maxima subsp. maxima, Dolichandra unguis-cati, Fagopyrum esculentum, Freesia alba, Juglans regia, Kalanchoë delagoënsis, Passiflora caerulea, Portulaca grandiflora, Prunus armeniaca, Prunus dulcis, Solanum tuberosum, Tradescantia sillamontana, and Washingtonia filifera). Furthermore, we provide the first geolocalized record of Araujia sericifera, the confirmation of Oxalis stricta, and propose a change of status for four taxa (Cenchrus setaceus, Salpichroa origanifolia, Sesbania punicea, and Nothoscordum gracile) for Calabria. The updated knowledge on the presence of new alien species in Calabria, in Italy and in Europe could allow for the prevention of other new entries and to eliminate this potential ecological threat to natural habitats. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Threatened Vegetation and Environmental Management)
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