New Advances and Applications in Biosensors for Biomolecules and Biochemicals

A special issue of Eng (ISSN 2673-4117).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2023) | Viewed by 3436

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824, USA
Interests: nanomaterials; nanotechnology; smart polymers; polymer electrochemistry; nanoelectronics; biomolecular science; sensing devices and transducers; solid-state electronics
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Guest Editor
Institute for Micromanufacturing, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272, USA
Interests: diamond-based neuro sensors; diamond electrochemistry; enzymatic neuro sensors; polymer-based sensors; surface chemistry; material characterization; electrodeposition; energy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Logic Technology Development Group, Intel Corporation, Hillsboro, OR 97124, USA
Interests: electrochemical biosensors; enzymatic sensors; neurotransmitter continuous monitoring; biomaterials; water quality monitoring; biosensor fabrication; lab-on-a chip devices; bacteria detection

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors have garnered considerable attention in recent years, both in academia and industry. Biosensors usually work by inducing biological or chemical reactions and generating signals on a transducing device. Theoretically, the signals are proportional to the concentration of the biomolecules. Successful examples of commercial biosensors include lateral flow pregnancy tests, electrochemical enzymatic glucose sensors, and, more recently, rapid antigen testing for SARS-CoV-2. Researchers have found innovative ways to develop biosensors for various biomolecules by combining powerful nanotechnology, state-of-the-art electronic devices, and advanced surface modification techniques. One of the main applications for biosensors is the detection of biomolecules or biochemicals that are early indicators of diseases (e.g., cancer) or other biological hazards. Biosensors can also be used in diverse applications such as environmental monitoring, food safety, defense, drug discovery, and implantable devices, to name a few. Because of this wide range of applications, biosensing technologies have become ubiquitous and are not confined to a specific niche. Our Special Issue aims to showcase the latest research in biosensor techniques based on the principles of electrochemistry, optical, piezoelectric, thermal, chemical, etc. This Special Issue will also cover sensor modification techniques based on biomolecules such as enzymes, antibodies, nucleic acids, and other affinity molecules. Finally, this Special Issue will allow researchers in the community to share their work on biosensor fabrication, in vitro and in vivo application, and biosensor instrumentation (including signal processing and transduction techniques) that encompass the detection of a variety of target biomolecules and biochemicals.

Dr. Edward Song
Dr. Gaurab Dutta
Dr. Md Imran Hossain
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Eng is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • biosensors
  • chemical sensors
  • optical sensors
  • microbial sensors
  • biosensor techniques
  • biosensor surface modification and chemistry
  • multiplexed detection
  • lab-on-a-chip-based biosensors
  • biosensor fabrication
  • affinity biomaterials
  • microfluidic devices for sensor applications
  • point-of-care diagnostic devices

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 7198 KiB  
Article
Steady vs. Dynamic Contributions of Different Doped Conducting Polymers in the Principal Components of an Electronic Nose’s Response
by Wiem Haj Ammar, Aicha Boujnah, Aimen Boubaker, Adel Kalboussi, Kamal Lmimouni and Sébastien Pecqueur
Eng 2023, 4(4), 2483-2496; https://doi.org/10.3390/eng4040141 - 22 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 936
Abstract
Multivariate data analysis and machine learning classification have become popular tools to extract features without physical models for complex environments recognition. For electronic noses, time sampling over multiple sensing elements must be a fair compromise between a period sufficiently long to output a [...] Read more.
Multivariate data analysis and machine learning classification have become popular tools to extract features without physical models for complex environments recognition. For electronic noses, time sampling over multiple sensing elements must be a fair compromise between a period sufficiently long to output a meaningful information pattern and sufficiently short to minimize training time for practical applications. Particularly when a reactivity’s kinetics differ from the thermodynamics in sensitive materials, finding the best compromise to get the most from the data is not obvious. Here, we investigate the influence of data acquisition to improve or alter data clustering for molecular recognition on a conducting polymer electronic nose. We found out that waiting for sensing elements to reach their steady state is not required for classification, and that reducing data acquisition down to the first dynamical information suffices to recognize molecular gases by principal component analysis with the same materials. Especially for online inference, this study shows that a good sensing array is not an array of good sensors, and that new figures of merit should be defined for sensing hardware using machine learning pattern recognition rather than metrology. Full article
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13 pages, 3536 KiB  
Article
Enhanced Performance Electrochemical Biosensor for Detection of Prostate Cancer Biomarker PCA3 Using Specific Aptamer
by Sarra Takita, Alexei Nabok, Anna Lishchuk, Magdi H. Mussa and David Smith
Eng 2023, 4(1), 367-379; https://doi.org/10.3390/eng4010022 - 29 Jan 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1908
Abstract
In the quest for the development of accurate, reliable, and cost-effective biosensing technology for early diagnostics of prostate cancer, we describe here an electrochemical biosensor combining a simple transducing method of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with an RNA-based aptamer labelled with a methylene [...] Read more.
In the quest for the development of accurate, reliable, and cost-effective biosensing technology for early diagnostics of prostate cancer, we describe here an electrochemical biosensor combining a simple transducing method of differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) with an RNA-based aptamer labelled with a methylene blue redox group acting as a highly specific bioreceptor to the prostate cancer biomarker PCA3. A series of DPV measurements on screen-printed gold electrodes is functionalised with a redox-labelled aptamer in solutions (either buffer or synthetic urine) containing PCA3 in a wide range of concentrations from 0.1 picomolar (pM) to 10 nanomolar (nM). In these measurements, the current peak values correlate with the concentration of PCA3 and yield a low detection limit (LDL) of 0.1 pM. Furthermore, the binding kinetics study revealed the high affinity of the aptamer to the target PCA3 with the affinity constants KD of about 3.0 × 10−8 molar. In addition, the AFM study showed the increase in the molecular layer roughness caused by the binding of PCA3, which is a large RNA molecular fragment. Full article
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