Special Issue "Innovation, Policy, and Regulation in Electricity Markets"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy Economics and Policy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Michael Pollitt
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Judge Business School, University of Cambridge, UK
Interests: electricity market design and regulation
Prof. Leonardo Meeus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Vlerick Business School, Brussels, Belgium;
Florence School of Regulation, European University Institute, Italy
Interests: electricity market design and regulation
Prof. Lynne Kiesling
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Regulatory Law & Economics, Carnegie Mellon University, USA
Interests: electricity market design and regulation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The rise of intermittent renewable generation, the coming mass penetration of electric vehicles and moves to decarbonise the gas grid are leading to widespread innovation experiments within electricity systems and their associated markets. These innovative experiments give rise to policy and regulatory questions which must be addressed if innovations are to become business as usual within the electricity grid. 

This special issue will explore lessons from electricity innovation experiments across the world and what implications they have for policy and regulation. We invite papers on experimental evidence on, inter alia: 

  • Local electricity markets run by distribution system operators (DSOs) 
  • DSO-TSO (transmission system operator) market co-ordination 
  • New system operator (SO) product markets 
  • Transactive energy pilots
  • Smart pricing experiments to manage renewable generation 
  • Smart EV charging 
  • Use of big data, AI and machine learning within electricity systems 
  • Power to hydrogen projects 

Authors are invited to use their papers to describe the nature of the experiments they discuss, the results of the experiments and what implications they have in the need to change existing policies and regulatory arrangements. Papers which discuss the results of completed innovation projects and/or compare multiple innovation projects are particularly encouraged.

Prof. Michael Pollitt
Prof. Leonardo Meeus
Prof. Lynne Kiesling
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Distribution system operator
  • Local electricity markets
  • Smart pricing
  • Transactive energy
  • Smart charging
  • Big data in electricity
  • Power to hydrogen

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Integration of Flexibility from Distributed Energy Resources: Mapping the Innovative Italian Pilot Project UVAM
Energies 2021, 14(7), 1910; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14071910 - 30 Mar 2021
Viewed by 399
Abstract
In light of the advancing energy transition and an increasing amount of intermittent renewable energy to be integrated, flexibility from distributed energy resources will be key. In this paper, the Italian UVAM (Unità Virtuali Abilitate Miste, i.e., virtually aggregated mixed units) project, one [...] Read more.
In light of the advancing energy transition and an increasing amount of intermittent renewable energy to be integrated, flexibility from distributed energy resources will be key. In this paper, the Italian UVAM (Unità Virtuali Abilitate Miste, i.e., virtually aggregated mixed units) project, one of the biggest pilots in Europe to serve this purpose, is critically reviewed and mapped after two years of operation. The pilot is analyzed on a global level as well as the individual participant level. Based on the extensive analysis of actual market data, different strategies of participating companies to obtain capacity in accordance with the pilot project’s design are identified. Furthermore, the specific bidding strategies of individual participating units on the balancing market are outlined. Alongside this, the overall pilot project’s market integration, in terms of offered and accepted bids, is depicted. The thorough data analysis, therefore, serves as an input and fundamental building block for future electricity market modeling. Comprehending specific data from the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, provides insights for future high renewable-energy scenarios. Based on the analysis findings, valuable deliverables are devised for both policy-makers and decision-makers who aim to leverage the flexibility potential of distributed resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation, Policy, and Regulation in Electricity Markets)
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Open AccessArticle
The Impact of Smart Prepaid Metering on Non-Technical Losses in Ghana
Energies 2021, 14(7), 1852; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14071852 - 26 Mar 2021
Viewed by 408
Abstract
The high incidence of electricity theft, meter tampering, meter bypassing, reading errors, and defective and aged meters, among others, increases utility losses, especially non-technical losses (NTL). A utility in Ghana piloted a non-technical loss reduction program in 2019 to replace postpaid meters with [...] Read more.
The high incidence of electricity theft, meter tampering, meter bypassing, reading errors, and defective and aged meters, among others, increases utility losses, especially non-technical losses (NTL). A utility in Ghana piloted a non-technical loss reduction program in 2019 to replace postpaid meters with anti-tamper, anti-fraud, and anti-theft smart prepaid meters. By using customer-level residential billing panel data from 2018 to 2019 obtained from the utility, we assess the effectiveness of this program using the difference-in-differences fixed-effect approach. On average, the results indicated that the reported amount of customers’ monthly electricity consumption increases by 13.2% when any tampered postpaid meter is replaced with a smart prepaid meter, indicating the NTLs by customers. We further employed quantile difference-in-differences regression and observed that reported energy consumption has increased for all households except those at the lower quantile (25th quantile). We conclude that smart prepaid metering could be a remedy to reduce NTLs for the electricity distribution sector in areas where electricity theft is rampant. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation, Policy, and Regulation in Electricity Markets)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Assessment of Demand Side Flexibility in European Electricity Markets: A Country Level Review
Energies 2021, 14(8), 2324; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14082324 - 20 Apr 2021
Viewed by 321
Abstract
Power systems in many countries have recently undergone a significant transition towards renewable and carbon-free generation sources. Those sources pose new challenges to the grid operation due to their intermittency and uncertainty. Consequently, advanced policy strategies and technologies offering new flexibility solutions on [...] Read more.
Power systems in many countries have recently undergone a significant transition towards renewable and carbon-free generation sources. Those sources pose new challenges to the grid operation due to their intermittency and uncertainty. Consequently, advanced policy strategies and technologies offering new flexibility solutions on the inelastic demand side are required to maintain the reliability of power systems. Given the diversity of situations, legislation and needs across European countries and the varying nature of distribution system operators, this article reviews the deployment of demand side flexibility at national level to identify best practices and main barriers. The analysis concerns European countries of different progress in solutions that leverage flexibility towards offering electricity grid services. The scope is to explore the operation principles of European electricity markets, to assess the participation of emerging flexible resources, and to propose new approaches that facilitate the integration of flexible assets in the distribution grid. The countries reviewed are the United Kingdom, Belgium, Italy and Greece. These countries were selected owing to their diversity in terms of generation mix and market design. Barriers for market access of flexibility resources are also identified in order to form relevant country-specific recommendations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation, Policy, and Regulation in Electricity Markets)
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