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Article

Welcoming New Entrants into European Electricity Markets

1
Florence School of Regulation, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, European University Institute, Via Boccaccio 121, 50133 Florence, Italy
2
Vlerick Energy Centre, Vlerick Business School, Bolwerklaan 21, 1210 Brussels, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Michael Pollitt, François Vallée and Peter V. Schaeffer
Energies 2021, 14(13), 4051; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14134051
Received: 4 May 2021 / Revised: 23 June 2021 / Accepted: 30 June 2021 / Published: 5 July 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Innovation, Policy, and Regulation in Electricity Markets)
In this review paper, we select four important waves of new entrants that knocked on the door of European electricity markets to illustrate how market rules need to be continuously adapted to allow new entrants to come in and push innovation forward. The new entrants that we selected are utilities venturing into neighbouring markets after establishing a strong position in their home market, utility-scale renewables project developers, asset-light software companies aggregating smaller consumers and producers, and different types of communities. We show that well-intentioned rules designed for certain types of market participants can (unintentionally) become obstacles for new entrants. We conclude that the evolution of market rules illustrates the importance of dynamic regulation. At the start of the liberalisation process the view was that we would deregulate or re-regulate the sector after which the role of regulators could be reduced. However, their role has only increased. New players tend to improve the sustainability of the electricity sector in environmental, social, or economic terms but might also present new risks that require intervention by regulators. View Full-Text
Keywords: electricity markets; integration; demand response; innovation; regulation electricity markets; integration; demand response; innovation; regulation
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MDPI and ACS Style

Schittekatte, T.; Reif, V.; Meeus, L. Welcoming New Entrants into European Electricity Markets. Energies 2021, 14, 4051. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14134051

AMA Style

Schittekatte T, Reif V, Meeus L. Welcoming New Entrants into European Electricity Markets. Energies. 2021; 14(13):4051. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14134051

Chicago/Turabian Style

Schittekatte, Tim, Valerie Reif, and Leonardo Meeus. 2021. "Welcoming New Entrants into European Electricity Markets" Energies 14, no. 13: 4051. https://doi.org/10.3390/en14134051

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