Special Issue "New Challenges in Energy and Environment"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Energy and Environment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Toshiyuki Sueyoshi
Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Management, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801, USA
2. School of Environment and Society, Tokyo Tech World Research Hub Initiative, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 3-3-6 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0023, Japan
Interests: management science, risk and policy analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Mika Goto
Website
Guest Editor
Tokyo Institute of Technology, School of Environment and Society, 3-3-6 Shibaura, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0023, Japan
Interests: energy economics; energy policy; technolgy development
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This journal Energies, listed in SCI and Q1/Q2 in SCImago Journal Rank, is publishing a Special Issue on “New Changes in Energy and Environment”. We are now facing different types of industrial pollution (e.g., air, water, soil, and others) and serious environmental problems (e.g., global warming and climate change), along with their industrial development and economic growth in the world. It is easily envisioned that energy markets will be drastically changed in near future. This special issue looks forward to embracing business and policy efforts for energy and environmental protection along with recent deregulation on energy outputs (e.g., electricity). Deregulation is a global trend in energy sectors and important for sustainable development. In contrast, environmental regulation is important in preventing various pollutions. We would like to see applications that measure how new technology assessment and development (e.g., smart city design/development, clean coal technology and shale oil/gas) can enhance energy efficiency, resource utilization, energy policy and other concerns on sustainable development (e.g., global warming and climate change). We also welcome new methodological developments in computer science (e.g., AI: artificial intelligence) and management science (e.g., DEA: data envelopment analysis) that discuss the energy and environmental challenges.

Prof. Dr. Toshiyuki Sueyoshi
Prof. Dr. Mika Goto
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • energy
  • environment
  • sustainability

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Environmental Assessment and Sustainable Development in the United States
Energies 2021, 14(4), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14041180 - 23 Feb 2021
Viewed by 185
Abstract
This study aims to overview the U.S. sustainable development by measuring the environmental performance of 50 states over the period of 2009–2018. To attain the objective, we employ data envelopment analysis for environmental assessment where we prioritize the minimization of CO2 emissions [...] Read more.
This study aims to overview the U.S. sustainable development by measuring the environmental performance of 50 states over the period of 2009–2018. To attain the objective, we employ data envelopment analysis for environmental assessment where we prioritize the minimization of CO2 emissions first and the maximization of gross state product later under the concept of managerial disposability (i.e., an environment-based performance measure). Then, we examine how the state-level environmental performance measures are associated with their political and spatial contexts. For the purpose, we conduct the Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test across groups of states characterized by their political transitions in the presidential and gubernatorial elections and defined by the regions of the U.S. Economic Development Administration and Environmental Protection Agency. Based on our empirical results, we find that (a) overall environmental performance has gradually enhanced over time, (b) there are statistically significant differences in the environmental performance measures along with the political transitions, and (c) states on both coasts have outperformed those of the middle in the measurement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Energy and Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
COVID-19 Response and Prospects of Clean/Sustainable Energy Transition in Industrial Nations: New Environmental Assessment
Energies 2021, 14(4), 1174; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14041174 - 22 Feb 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 216
Abstract
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) became a pandemic around the world and has huge impacts on our economic and social systems, particularly on the healthcare system and the transportation and energy sectors. To examine a relationship between healthcare and energy sectors in the COVID-19 [...] Read more.
Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) became a pandemic around the world and has huge impacts on our economic and social systems, particularly on the healthcare system and the transportation and energy sectors. To examine a relationship between healthcare and energy sectors in the COVID-19 era, we propose a holistic application of Data Envelopment Analysis for Environmental Assessment (DEA-EA) to assess the COVID-19 response performance of 33 OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development) nations and investigate whether health insurance systems contribute to the performance. We also associate the performance with mobility, which is an energy consumption measure, to test the relationship through statistical analyses. In the DEA-EA, particularly, this study incorporates undesirable outputs (i.e., the number of confirmed cases and that of deaths) as well as desirable outputs (i.e., the number of total recovered people and that of total tested people) during April 2020 as the initial stage of COVID-19. While the former outputs need to be maximized, the latter ones need to be minimized in the assessment of healthcare system performance. This study finds that (a) the COVID-19 response performance of countries is varying and those with higher public health coverage have outperformed others with lower public coverage in terms of combating the COVID-19 outbreak, and (b) the healthcare system performance is significantly associated with mobility. Particularly, the second finding indicates that outperforming nations in the healthcare system are returning to the normal (with less volatility) while underperforming ones are still stagnating in terms of mobility. It implies that outperforming countries need to prepare for continuous commitment to clean/sustainable energy transition. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Energy and Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Coupling Solar Thermal System and Geothermal Heat Pump Systems in Areas with Unbalanced Heating and Cooling Demand
Energies 2021, 14(1), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14010031 - 23 Dec 2020
Viewed by 321
Abstract
Geothermal source heat pump (GSHP) systems as renewable energy systems are being more frequently installed as part of the zero-energy building drive. However, in South Korea, where a large amount of heating load can be required, maintaining high system performance by using only [...] Read more.
Geothermal source heat pump (GSHP) systems as renewable energy systems are being more frequently installed as part of the zero-energy building drive. However, in South Korea, where a large amount of heating load can be required, maintaining high system performance by using only a GSHP is difficult owing to the gradual degradation of its thermal performance. The performance of a solar-assisted GSHP system was therefore experimentally analyzed and compared with a GSHP-only system. The results showed that the heating coefficient of performance of the GSHP-only operation was 5.4, while that of the solar-assisted GSHP operation was 7.0. In the case of the GSHP-only system, the maximum temperature of the heat pump water supply on the heat source side was initially 13.1 °C, but this rapidly decreased to 11.4 °C during operation. For the solar-assisted GSHP system, the temperature of the water supply to the heat source side of the heat pump was controlled at 15–20.9 °C, and the power consumption for system operation was reduced by about 20% compared with that for the GSHP-only system. Much higher temperatures could be supplied when solar heat is used instead of ground heat, as solar heat contributes to the performance improvement of the heat pump system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Energy and Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Suitability Pre-Assessment of in-Sewer Heat Recovery Sites Combining Energy and Wastewater Perspectives
Energies 2020, 13(24), 6680; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13246680 - 17 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 352
Abstract
In many countries around the world heating (and cooling) has been and will remain the biggest energy sector, but it is still widely dominated by fossil energy sources today. Wastewater as a source of renewable energy contains large amounts of heat and due [...] Read more.
In many countries around the world heating (and cooling) has been and will remain the biggest energy sector, but it is still widely dominated by fossil energy sources today. Wastewater as a source of renewable energy contains large amounts of heat and due to its place-bound localization in urban sewer systems it is usually also situated in very close distance to potential heat consumers. However, one has to keep in mind that heat extraction from wastewater might have undesired impacts on temperature-sensitive treatment processes in the related wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). To assess the potential impact of in-sewer heat recovery on inflow temperature, two different approaches are available today: a simple (but less significant) alligation alternate, or very accurate (but less practical) mathematical models. To close the gap between practicability and significance this article introduces a novel approach to pre-assess the suitability of in-sewer heat recovery sites based on little and easily available data considering energy- and wastewater-related perspectives. A case study application demonstrates the informative value and general usability of the approach. Consequently, the proposed procedure can provide guidance and a template for related investigations at any place in a conventional (combined or separated) sewer system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Energy and Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Performance Assessment of the Semiconductor Industry: Measured by DEA Environmental Assessment
Energies 2020, 13(22), 5998; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13225998 - 17 Nov 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 373
Abstract
This study measures the unified (i.e., operational and environmental) performance of semiconductor firms in the world by using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) environmental assessment. With its promising and expanding electronic applications, many industrial nations have supported the semiconductor industry under their strategic plans, [...] Read more.
This study measures the unified (i.e., operational and environmental) performance of semiconductor firms in the world by using Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) environmental assessment. With its promising and expanding electronic applications, many industrial nations have supported the semiconductor industry under their strategic plans, and numerous firms are involved in the global value chain. Drawing on the proposed DEA-based environmental (sustainability) assessment, which uses two disposability criteria (i.e., natural and managerial), this study first compute the unified efficiency scores of semiconductor firms. Then, this study explores how corporate age, business model, and location influence the efficiency scores by employing Tobit regressions and t-tests. The empirical implications obtained from this research indicate that overall, the semiconductor firms look for their economic achievements but are not paying enough attention to environmental sustainability. Corporate age and business model are statistically related with their operational performance measures whereas corporate location is related with their environmental ones. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Energy and Environment)
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Open AccessArticle
Operational Performance of Electric Power Firms: Comparison between Japan and South Korea by Non-Radial Measures
Energies 2020, 13(15), 3968; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13153968 - 02 Aug 2020
Viewed by 851
Abstract
This study compares the electric power sectors between Japan and South (S) Korea. Both nations have been under a global trend of deregulation. To assess their progress due to industrial change and technology development, we use Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) as an assessment [...] Read more.
This study compares the electric power sectors between Japan and South (S) Korea. Both nations have been under a global trend of deregulation. To assess their progress due to industrial change and technology development, we use Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) as an assessment tool that enables us to evaluate the level of simultaneous achievements on economic and technological measures, so assessing the degree of holistic development. DEA has been widely applied for performance assessment in the past decades. In this study, the method compares electric power firms by their operational efficiencies. To compare their achievements, it is necessary to develop a new type of DEA application for performance measurement. The proposed approach adds two analytical capabilities. First, the approach needs to handle “zero” in a data set and then restrict multipliers (i.e., weights among inputs and outputs) without any prior information to increase our empirical reliability. No study has simultaneously explored the two capabilities in DEA. Using the proposed method, our empirical study identifies two findings. One of the two is that the electric power industry of S. Korea outperformed that of the Japanese industry in the observed periods (2014–2018) because the Japanese power sector still suffered from an occurrence of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant disaster which occurred on 1 March 2011. However, the difference has been gradually diminishing because the Japanese electricity industry has been gradually recovering from the huge disaster. The other is that the S. Korean power industry has been in a descending trend because the nation has shown technical regress as a result of inconsistent technology development (e.g., shifting its R&D: Research and Development) focus from electrical engineering to chemistry). The former R&D area is essential in maintaining the technical level of S. Korea′s electric power industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Challenges in Energy and Environment)
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